60 mm macro - is it really macro?
  • I have two macro lenses with my Nikon camera, the 60 and the 40, and I love taking macro pictures of flowers and stuff. I love how close I can get with the Nikkor macro lenses. Now I am very interested in getting the Fujinon 60 mm, but I am reading it's not a 1:1, but a mere 1:2 magnification. Plus, it doesn't let me get close (26 cm). I am hesitant to buy it now, because I am worried it's not letting me produce the same quality of pictures.
    Do you own this lens? Will it be a good macro lens?
    Thanks for any info!
  • veejayceeveejaycee
    Posts: 2,042
    Your figures are correct but as we're talking macro and ultra careful manual focus - how about using your Nikons via an adapter? The 40mm becomes your 60mm and you get a 90mm from the 60.
    Nikon D700/D300, 17-35mm, 24-70mm, 28-300mm, 50-500mm, 35, 50, 85, 135 and 180mm primes. Fuji XPro 1, Fujinon XF lenses - 14mm f2.8, 35mm f1.4, Fuji XF 60mm f1.4, 18-55mm f2.8-4 OIS, 55-200mm f3.5-f4.8 OIS.
  • WestmillWestmill
    Posts: 151
    A true Macro is 1 to 1 but..... half lifesize is dam close :) The question is... have you ever used or use often at full one to one ? It could be that half life size is more than enough. If you get desperate you can always crop too. Just a thought :)
  • I have two macro lenses with my Nikon camera, the 60 and the 40, and I love taking macro pictures of flowers and stuff. I love how close I can get with the Nikkor macro lenses. Now I am very interested in getting the Fujinon 60 mm, but I am reading it's not a 1:1, but a mere 1:2 magnification. Plus, it doesn't let me get close (26 cm). I am hesitant to buy it now, because I am worried it's not letting me produce the same quality of pictures.
    Do you own this lens? Will it be a good macro lens?
    Thanks for any info!



    26 cm??? Wow, that is not very close at all. If that is as close as it will focus, it's not a real macro lens in my book. I have several regular lenses that focus down to 0.3 m and that is nowhere near macro shooting.
    Fujifilm Gear: F10, F20, F70EXR, XF1, X10, X100 (w/ Fujinon WCL-X100), S5 Pro, (w/Nikkor 24mm f/1.4, 35mm f/1.8, and 50mm f/1.2 lenses), Fujifilm GA645

    And a freezer full of Fuji Neopan Acros and 400H film.

    Clearly someone who hates Fujifilm and their products.

    MacBook Pro 2.53 GHz, 8 gigs RAM
  • I have two macro lenses with my Nikon camera, the 60 and the 40, and I love taking macro pictures of flowers and stuff. I love how close I can get with the Nikkor macro lenses. Now I am very interested in getting the Fujinon 60 mm, but I am reading it's not a 1:1, but a mere 1:2 magnification. Plus, it doesn't let me get close (26 cm). I am hesitant to buy it now, because I am worried it's not letting me produce the same quality of pictures.
    Do you own this lens? Will it be a good macro lens?
    Thanks for any info!



    I shoot lots of macro and you'd be better off buying an adapter to use your nikon 60mm if you are really concerned about 1:1. I have the Fuji 60mm for general purpose macro and I enjoy the nice working distance. In fact it's considered a good trait of a macro lens if there is some useful Front Working Distance (FWD) which is the space between front element of lens and subject. This is desireable for the sake of lighting the subject and not frightening off flying insects and spiders. The Nikon 60mm (and the 40mm is even worse) has such a short FWD that the shadow cast by the lens barrel can creep into the image area. It is also very difficult with those lenses to use flash when focusing in the 1:1 range.
    Right now I'm using the Fuji 60mm for general purpose and it's a wonderfully sharp and capable lens though unfortunately very susceptible to flare when shooting in strong light even with the hood in place.
    When I need more magnification than 1:2 I break out my B+W +10 diopter close up filter. This doesn't degrade the quality of the lens too much as I have a 58mm and I use a stepping ring to get it to 39mm and so I'm using the middle (best part) of the close up filter. This gets me in the neighbourhood of 1:1 with still decent working distance.
    If I need 1:1 with higher quality I'll use my Nikon adapter and a BR-2A reversing ring to reverse my Nikon MF 50mm 1.8 AIS lens.
    If I need 2:1-4:1 (double to four times life size) I'll use extension tubes with the reversed 50mm which cuts down the FWD but gives good magnification.
    If I need 9:1 or greater I reverse my Zeiss 25mm f/2.0 lens (picking up a used Nikkor MF 28mm f/2.8 E series for this won't set you back much and is surprisingly good when reversed) and extension tubes for massive magnification but you'll need a super rigid tripod and a macro focusing rail to attempt such high magnifications. Plus FWD disappears pretty quick as you increase the magnification of the reversed wide angle using extension tubes, to the point you have to watch out for your point of focus drifting into the inside of your lens (becoming virtual focus) and rendering your setup useless forcing you back a step in magnification.
    Here is a 1:2 shot of part of a Canadian $10 bill from the 60mm for you to have a peek at:
    20120405-_DSF0577

    X-Pro 1 (Vis/IR), 8mm f/2.8, 14mm f/2.8, 23mm f/1.7, 35mm f/1.4, 60mm f/2.4, 55-200 f/3.5-4.8 OIS
    Legacy F-Mount glass: 25mm f/2, 35mm f/1.4, 50mm f/1.8&1.2, 100mm f/2
    X100S
    RX100
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/markdphotoguy/
    http://www.alamy.com/stock-photography/FBCFA052-6648-4E30-8563-6AE2C8D45292/Mark Dalpe.html
  • Westmill said:

    A true Macro is 1 to 1 but..... half lifesize is dam close :) The question is... have you ever used or use often at full one to one ? It could be that half life size is more than enough. If you get desperate you can always crop too. Just a thought :)



    I'm not that serious about macro, but sometimes I want to get real close.


    Thank you for your feedback, everyone!

  • I think 1:1 in FF isn't the same as in APS-C, right? In FF it means, that you can take a sensor-size photo from a 36mm long subject (ca. 24mm in APS-C). So 1:2 in APS-C means 48mm, that's a 1:1.3 ratio in terms of FF. Not that bad... Or am I wrong??
    Nice arachnaphobia-therapie-shot by the way!
  • veejayceeveejaycee
    Posts: 2,042
    Surely 1:1 is 1:1 regardless of sensor size - all the effective lens focal length does is increase/decrease the working distance to get that 1:1.
    1:1 is the reproduction ratio of the subject at the native resolution of the camera in use.
    Nikon D700/D300, 17-35mm, 24-70mm, 28-300mm, 50-500mm, 35, 50, 85, 135 and 180mm primes. Fuji XPro 1, Fujinon XF lenses - 14mm f2.8, 35mm f1.4, Fuji XF 60mm f1.4, 18-55mm f2.8-4 OIS, 55-200mm f3.5-f4.8 OIS.
  • ollipro1 said:

    I think 1:1 in FF isn't the same as in APS-C, right? In FF it means, that you can take a sensor-size photo from a 36mm long subject (ca. 24mm in APS-C). So 1:2 in APS-C means 48mm, that's a 1:1.3 ratio in terms of FF. Not that bad... Or am I wrong??
    Nice arachnaphobia-therapie-shot by the way!


    The lens' ability to project a 1:1 image is unaffected by the sensor size. Imagine you had a projector (lens) set up to project an image onto a screen (sensor) where an image of a person was a full length life size projection. Now if you reduced the size of the projector screen (crop sensor) to only display the head and shoulders of the person the screen would display less of the projected image but the image would still be life size. Only if we move the projector (lens) can we affect magnification. For instance moving the projector (lens) further away from the screen (sensor) will make the image grow in size and is how extension tubes work, they move the optical centre of the lens further from the imaging plane thus causing an enlarged imaging circle.

    X-Pro 1 (Vis/IR), 8mm f/2.8, 14mm f/2.8, 23mm f/1.7, 35mm f/1.4, 60mm f/2.4, 55-200 f/3.5-4.8 OIS
    Legacy F-Mount glass: 25mm f/2, 35mm f/1.4, 50mm f/1.8&1.2, 100mm f/2
    X100S
    RX100
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/markdphotoguy/
    http://www.alamy.com/stock-photography/FBCFA052-6648-4E30-8563-6AE2C8D45292/Mark Dalpe.html
  • 26 cm??? Wow, that is not very close at all. If that is as close as it will focus, it's not a real macro lens in my book. I have several regular lenses that focus down to 0.3 m and that is nowhere near macro shooting.



    I don't think you can judge the qualities of a genuine macro lens on how close it can focus - the min focussing distance of my Canon EF100 Macro lens is 31cm, while the Canon EF 180L macro lens (in my dreams) has a min focusing distance of 43cm! In fact, it's generally regarded that - particularly with wildlife close-ups - the greater the minimum working distance of a true macro lens, the better.

  • WilzWorkz7WilzWorkz7
    Posts: 1,761
    veejaycee said:

    Your figures are correct but as we're talking macro and ultra careful manual focus - how about using your Nikons via an adapter? The 40mm becomes your 60mm and you get a 90mm from the 60.



    Second this.

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  • i use the raynox dcr 250 on my 18-55, works very well upto a point but better suited with the 60mm lens allowing you to get much higher magnification without loss of quality and at around £40-50 well worth it.
    sample shots her with the 60mm lens. alternative cheap choice get an m42 adapter and you can pick up 135mm prime m42 lens for under £30
  • can you send me an image including the raynox mounted on your cam with the 60mm?

    would be curious..

    thanks
    currently no fuji..
    M9 - Summicron-M 50
    www.flickr.com/photos/trustkill24

  • Hi Karinatwork - thanks for asking this question. I am considering selling all my Canon gear because I love the Fuji X lenses but I need a decent macro for shooting jewellery and the reviews of the 60mm for macro work have not been flattering. Markdphotoguy's answer is really useful and makes me feel more comfortable about using this lens with a diopter.
  • I use a set with +1, +2, +3 dioptric lenses (alone or together)
    This is the result Your text to link...
  • veejayceeveejaycee
    Posts: 2,042

    I use a set with +1, +2, +3 dioptric lenses (alone or tighter)
    This is the result Your text to link...



    That is hellish good Peter - may I inquire as to your method of focusing?
    Vic
    Nikon D700/D300, 17-35mm, 24-70mm, 28-300mm, 50-500mm, 35, 50, 85, 135 and 180mm primes. Fuji XPro 1, Fujinon XF lenses - 14mm f2.8, 35mm f1.4, Fuji XF 60mm f1.4, 18-55mm f2.8-4 OIS, 55-200mm f3.5-f4.8 OIS.
  • I move my body front and rear :-)
  • Deanmessenger- how do you mount the DCR 250 to the 60mm lens? According to their site Raynox do not make a 39mm adapter ring
  • veejayceeveejaycee
    Posts: 2,042

    I move my body front and rear :-)



    What about the camera though? :)
    Nikon D700/D300, 17-35mm, 24-70mm, 28-300mm, 50-500mm, 35, 50, 85, 135 and 180mm primes. Fuji XPro 1, Fujinon XF lenses - 14mm f2.8, 35mm f1.4, Fuji XF 60mm f1.4, 18-55mm f2.8-4 OIS, 55-200mm f3.5-f4.8 OIS.
  • Anyone use this lens for portraits as well as macro?
  • dannyblighdannybligh
    Posts: 121
    For what it's worth - I bought the 60mm macro for my X-Pro1 and ended up being surprised at how close it "didn't" focus. I was expecting to be able to get a LOT closer. I came from a Sigma 50mm macro that would focus INSANELY close to anything I put it in front of - where the 60mm Fuji macro was just nowhere near that in my honest opinion. I ended up returning it after just not using it enough at all to justify the cost.

    For the first half hour with it I thought something was seriously wrong with it, because it refused to focus close up, then I realized I had to back up quite a way to get it to focus. It just wasn't for me in the long run. But again this was coming from a pretty extreme close up lens on my Nikon D700.
    Fuji X-Pro1
    www.DannyBligh.com
  • Anyone use this lens for portraits as well as macro?



    Me!
    you can see here some portraits. Your text to link...
  • veejayceeveejaycee
    Posts: 2,042
    The 60mm f2.4 is a great portrait lens from the results I've seen. The sharpness is that non-edgy sharpness which is needed in a portrait lens and the bokeh is superb. However, many are unhappy with it's max aperture (they shouldn't be IMO) and it is a bit slow in AF so there are used examples around and very likely there will be many more at even lower prices once the 56mm f1.4 comes on line and 60mm users sell them off.
    Nikon D700/D300, 17-35mm, 24-70mm, 28-300mm, 50-500mm, 35, 50, 85, 135 and 180mm primes. Fuji XPro 1, Fujinon XF lenses - 14mm f2.8, 35mm f1.4, Fuji XF 60mm f1.4, 18-55mm f2.8-4 OIS, 55-200mm f3.5-f4.8 OIS.
  • EternalHopeEternalHope
    Posts: 559
    img src="Untitled" alt="" />
    img src="DSCF9790" alt="" />

    More casual macro, but still good enough to get some fun shots of flowers and stuff in. I haven't done any serious bugs or anything yet, but I was satisfied with what I got from this as a macro lens, and the portrait is superb in good light.
  • TylerTyler
    Posts: 1
    Nice portrait Eternal. Is that OOC?
  • EternalHopeEternalHope
    Posts: 559
    Hey Tyler, no not OOC. I used aperture and vsco film 02 with some tweaks to tinting and highlights and contrast curves, sharpening of the eyes etc. Also the first shot was using vsco film as well. I honestly don't like the processing of the first one, and just didn't get around to changing it back. I was just messing around with the new presets when I took it. But honestly the portrait wasn't too terribly far off. It wasn't a drastic change, just a lot of subtleties. The camera and lens really did nail it pretty much right off the bat. The lens isn't for everyone, but any time I'm doing any outdoor portrait work where I have some room to move, this lens comes with me.

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