Fujifilm X Mount Lens Road Map 2012-2013
  • ChristopherChristopher
    Posts: 2,550
    Update! Fujifilm officially announces the 2012-2013 lens roadmap in the image below:

    Fujifilm X-Mount lens road map 2013

    Fujifilm has announced their X Mount lens roadmap for 2012 and 2013 at CES, but didn't share any specific details. It is believed there will be at least six more lenses coming, and all zoom lenses will feature a built-in image stabilization system.

    Fuji X-Pro1 lenses

    X Mount Lenses at launch:
    - 18mm f/2.0 pancake
    - 35mm f/1.4
    - 60mm f/2.4 Macro

    These are the lenses coming in fall of 2012:
    - 14mm f/2.8
    - 18-72mm f/4.0 with IS

    These are the lenses coming in 2013:
    - 28mm f/2.8 pancake
    - 23mm f/2.0
    - 72-200mm f/4.0 IS
    - 12-24mm f/4.0 IS

    Via Focus Numérique
    Fuji X Series Administrator · ChrisMarks.com · Space Cadet Photo Blog · Flickr
  • gregvdsgregvds
    Posts: 531
    So, no 23mm, 35mm equivalent before 2013. This let some space for an X200, renewed, Trans-X CMOS, oldstyle, better back, better firmware...
  • kiwikiwi
    Posts: 460
    gregvds said:

    So, no 23mm, 35mm equivalent before 2013. This let some space for an X200, renewed, Trans-X CMOS, oldstyle, better back, better firmware...




    My thoughts as well. The X100 will have to be updated somehow simply from a marketing point of view and they have left the opening in the lens range for that to happen.
  • LarryLarry
    Posts: 307
    I will certainly continue shooting with the X100. Nothing on the planet does fill-flash better. I expect the X-Pro1 focal plane shutter to be fairly quiet, but nothing can match the X100 for quiet. For traveling light, the 23mm lens is a superb compromise. It is a camera with which I greatly enjoy working, and the results have been outstanding.

    I greatly like the fact that the cameras are so similar in controls and concept. During film days, I commonly shot with two bodies and a X100/X-Pro1 combination would be ideal. Love the idea of a 23mm/60mm combination for street and a 23mm/18mm or 14mm combination for indoor people-photography. It would be nice to have access to the 14mm from the beginning. I would probably skip the 18mm. I will stick to the D700 for zooms and manual focus lenses.
  • cosinaphilecosinaphile
    Posts: 1,063
    fuji has said that the roadmap is more or less accurate .... 9 lenses but the speeds may change
    i think that at least one of the zooms will be a 2.8 -4, i also think users of the pro will clamor for a 23mm 1.4 or 2 and fuji will respond sooner than they let on . this for the revenue as well as enhancing their image as a camera company who listens.
    i think by 2013 we will see several cameras with this new lens mount perhaps even a lower priced version than the 1800 dollar version of this pro body perhaps a pseudo slr form factor too with a huge battery and more studio features

    im very happy fuji has decided to be supportive of adapted glass users i hope they support the use of fujinon manual lenses in addition to the m mount they have already committed to
    i shoot with the ricoh gxr and m mount module with adapted glass
    i shoot with the samsung ex1 and the ricoh gx 200
    i shoot with the ep1 and gf1 with adapted slr and rf glass
    i shoot with the x100 and the x10
  • SergioSergio
    Posts: 362
    Am I the only one thats hesitant to adopt a system that will only be relevant while this body of camera exists?

    The thing I love about my Nikons and one of the main reasons I chose Nikon over cannon is because every Nikon DSLR lens can be mounted on any Nikon DSLR, even lenses from the 80s. Nikon lenses are never truly obsolete same as leica lenses, but these new fuji lenses look great except that when this body is replaced and a hot new camera comes along with a different focusing mechanism then these lenses will be obsolete.... I dont know about you guys but I think of glass as an investment that supposed to outlive camera bodies not the other way around.
    Nikon D800 - X100 - Nikon D7000
    14 - 24 f2.8, 50 f1.4, 70-200 f2.8 VRII
  • kiwikiwi
    Posts: 460
    I guess people were saying exactly the same thing In 1969 when the Nikon F mount was introduced. The difference then of course is that there was no Internet for them to express their views to a world wide audience.
  • SergioSergio
    Posts: 362
    I dont think you see the point... even if Nikon changed their mount in ten years and a new one replaced it people could easily get an adapter and use their glass manually (focus and aperture control on most lenses and in the worst case scenario just focus at wide open). These lenses are focus by wire which means they will only focus connected to the camera that supports this system...
    Nikon D800 - X100 - Nikon D7000
    14 - 24 f2.8, 50 f1.4, 70-200 f2.8 VRII
  • TenisdTenisd
    Posts: 17
    I realy dont care about the current Canon and Nikon systems anymore. The lenses are just too big and too expensive for what they offer.
    None of them even have tryed to make a small 35mm F1.4 lens under 600$...

    They are just chasing marketing clouds or something.

    I think the time for little smaller cameras have come and this is one beautiful way to get in there.

    With the current Fujifilm lineup of lenses listed here, its almost perfect, only they miss some kind of 90mm(135mm equivalent) fixed lens.

    Right now I think, if the AF is great and everything else is as good as the X100 or even better, then the X-Pro1 with the 14mm F2.8 and 60mm F2.4(better the 90mm fixed lens) + X100 is all I need for all my work.
  • mattmabermattmaber
    Posts: 3,971
    Yes Im not too bothered thats its a new system, that has to be a good thing surely? And Fuji appear to have built in some future proofing with those data connectors.

    They may well license it to other manufacturers too I guess. Could get Tamron & Sigma lenses
     Mac · Blog · Flickr · g+ · Facebook · Twitter
    Fuji X100 & EF-X20 Flash · Leica M6, Nokton Classic 35mm f1.4 & SF20 Flash · Canonet 17 · Fuji X-Pro1, 18mm & 10-24mm · Canonet 28 · Yashica Minister III · Miranda MS-1 · Yashica 124G · BIllingham Hadley Small & Large
  • cosinaphilecosinaphile
    Posts: 1,063
    thats the point believe in fuji the way some believed in the f mount when it was introduced ,or dont .....canon slr changed mounts nikon didnt history.....history

    fuji is worth believing in ...they are a serious maker of cameras and lenses, and frankly
    with the introduction of nikon mirrorless i have a bit more faith in fujis mirrorless for about 1 million reasons..
    yes the f mount has commendable longevity, but i see no reason to question fujis commitment
    to the x mount

    ............discuss....:)
    i shoot with the ricoh gxr and m mount module with adapted glass
    i shoot with the samsung ex1 and the ricoh gx 200
    i shoot with the ep1 and gf1 with adapted slr and rf glass
    i shoot with the x100 and the x10
  • SergioSergio
    Posts: 362
    Im just saying the F mont, M mount, any mount where the lens maintains manual control over at least focusing give that glass longevity because if you ever want to use it on another platform all you need is an adapter.

    In my opinion the problem with this new system isn't the mount (I only used the F mount as an example). The thing thats holding me back is the focus by wire of these lenses. This means these lenses will not be usable in any other system even if you can get an adapter for the mount because you wont be able to focus them manually.

    Picture this... You buy the system and all of the lenses... and lets say for the sake of argument that all the lenses are $600 a piece thats a total of $4,800 on lenses alone and lets say $1,700 for the camera and kit lens, a total of at least $6,500 (thats assuming that all the new lenses cost $600 which is VERY unlikely). Then down the road Fuji develops a new faster AF system and stops supporting this version of their AF. Thats over 5 grand down the drain because even if you could get an adapter to mount your old glass on this amazing new system it would be useless because you wouldn't even be able to focus it manually.

    you know what one of my favorite lenses to use on my D7000 is? a cheap 50mm 1.8 E series lens, a lens that probably as old as me but I can still mount on my 6 month old camera and fully use because it is completely manual.

    its not about the mount its about the focusing system it relies on the camera to work and thats my big problem with this system, when the camera becomes obsolete there is a good chance so will its glass...

    Nikon D800 - X100 - Nikon D7000
    14 - 24 f2.8, 50 f1.4, 70-200 f2.8 VRII
  • artmartm
    Posts: 134
    Sergio: I'm with you. Too much of an investment in this system to rely on technology that's not guaranteed to survive the intermediate and long term.

    I'm a long time Nikon user. I will not sell my Nikon D300, 70-200/f2.8, 200-400/f4 system for this Fuji one. The too cannot compare for my needs - sports photography. Nikon has the best lens longevity and when you're investing $5K for a 200-400/f4 you want it to last.

    It's difficult in today's world to invest in technology while fearign it will be obsolete soon after. Granted, if you like this Fuji system and can use it for 5-10 years, then good for you. Is it worth it with all its limitations? For me, no; for others, yes.

    You can't have the best of everything in any one camera. I also have an X10 and love it, as I did with my Leica D-Lux 4. They do the job where the D300 can't.

    I'm sure this new Fuji will do the job for many where the X10/X100 couldn't.
  • mattmabermattmaber
    Posts: 3,971
    @Sergio I understand what you're saying. So these lenses won't focus without the body? Theres no mechanical focusing? Is that right?
    Is there anything to stop an adaptor to another body having the relevant hardware in it to allow them to focus?
    TBH I wouldn't expect many people to use these on anything other than a Fuji X... camera and I suspect Fuji think the same.
    Being able to use OLD lenses on a Fuji X body interest me more (though I doubt Id actually buy a non Fuji X lens).
     Mac · Blog · Flickr · g+ · Facebook · Twitter
    Fuji X100 & EF-X20 Flash · Leica M6, Nokton Classic 35mm f1.4 & SF20 Flash · Canonet 17 · Fuji X-Pro1, 18mm & 10-24mm · Canonet 28 · Yashica Minister III · Miranda MS-1 · Yashica 124G · BIllingham Hadley Small & Large
  • SergioSergio
    Posts: 362
    @mattmaber Exactly, the way its set up now is you turn the focus ring, it sends a signal to the camera saying "hey im being turned" the camera says "oh shit, move the glass" and the lens says "ok... and moves the glass". So without the camera doing the middle work the lens cannot be focused. My concern isn't using these lenses on another brand camera my concern is that lets be honest this focusing system is not that great and in todays world with technology taking leaps and bound things that are "not that great" get discontinued and replaced quick. Thats my fear that I invest on 9 lenses and two years later fuji's x-pro 3 comes with an amazing new AF and MF system that doesn't support this glass.

    I can understand focus by wire on the X100 where the camera is the investment but when you talk about a set of lenses thats whats supposed to last, bodies come and go but lenses are supposed to out live their owners.
    Nikon D800 - X100 - Nikon D7000
    14 - 24 f2.8, 50 f1.4, 70-200 f2.8 VRII
  • cosinaphilecosinaphile
    Posts: 1,063
    Sergio said:

    Im just saying the F mont, M mount, any mount where the lens maintains manual control over at least focusing give that glass longevity because if you ever want to use it on another platform all you need is an adapter.

    In my opinion the problem with this new system isn't the mount (I only used the F mount as an example). The thing thats holding me back is the focus by wire of these lenses. This means these lenses will not be usable in any other system even if you can get an adapter for the mount because you wont be able to focus them manually.

    Picture this... You buy the system and all of the lenses... and lets say for the sake of argument that all the lenses are $600 a piece thats a total of $4,800 on lenses alone and lets say $1,700 for the camera and kit lens, a total of at least $6,500 (thats assuming that all the new lenses cost $600 which is VERY unlikely). Then down the road Fuji develops a new faster AF system and stops supporting this version of their AF. Thats over 5 grand down the drain because even if you could get an adapter to mount your old glass on this amazing new system it would be useless because you wouldn't even be able to focus it manually.

    you know what one of my favorite lenses to use on my D7000 is? a cheap 50mm 1.8 E series lens, a lens that probably as old as me but I can still mount on my 6 month old camera and fully use because it is completely manual.

    its not about the mount its about the focusing system it relies on the camera to work and thats my big problem with this system, when the camera becomes obsolete there is a good chance so will its glass...



    +1 i have mentioned on several sites my dissapointment at the continued use by fuji of focus by wire,,,, nikon is able to make lenses that allow af and mf operation as well as
    true settable not solely electronic f stops

    i i believe it to be a completely wrongheaded view of lens evolution by more than one camera maker .... the sooner fuji migrates to true helicoids and true mechanical f stops with af and autofunction the better ... i hopethey return tomore cameras and systems like we have seen with the readoption of viewfinders
    i shoot with the ricoh gxr and m mount module with adapted glass
    i shoot with the samsung ex1 and the ricoh gx 200
    i shoot with the ep1 and gf1 with adapted slr and rf glass
    i shoot with the x100 and the x10
  • mattmabermattmaber
    Posts: 3,971
    @sergio ah understand now.
    Still, Id love to have this camera :\
     Mac · Blog · Flickr · g+ · Facebook · Twitter
    Fuji X100 & EF-X20 Flash · Leica M6, Nokton Classic 35mm f1.4 & SF20 Flash · Canonet 17 · Fuji X-Pro1, 18mm & 10-24mm · Canonet 28 · Yashica Minister III · Miranda MS-1 · Yashica 124G · BIllingham Hadley Small & Large
  • cosinaphilecosinaphile
    Posts: 1,063
    to add , i have been using and adapting glass for m4\3 since 2009
    my first was a nikkor h 50mm f2 "bodycapped " for use on my epi and gf1

    i have bought a few panny special purpose lenses but not a singlle olympus lens beyond
    the kit zoom ,but i did purchase a15mm 4.5 a 28mm 1.9 and a 50mm 1.5 voigtlander iwith adapters as well as many other legacy lenses in that time

    fuji needs to wake up on this issue and make lenses that will make the pro and enthusiast
    will want and respect

    my contax g 45 and 90 almost ended up on the trashbin of history but luckily the true helicoid inside accessable by spindle is adaptable

    i truely hate the idea of all electronic lenses ....+ 1 to all your comments
    i shoot with the ricoh gxr and m mount module with adapted glass
    i shoot with the samsung ex1 and the ricoh gx 200
    i shoot with the ep1 and gf1 with adapted slr and rf glass
    i shoot with the x100 and the x10
  • SergioSergio
    Posts: 362
    Believe me I want it too... I love everything about it so far except the focusing mechanism. I think thats the only thing holding me back and whats scary is that normally when a manufacturer has a product with a weak point and they release a new one with that weak point sorted out they make a big deal about how they have fixed this and that issue based on feed back. With this camera the only thing we've heard regarding the focusing was the canadian fuji guy saying "much improved over the x100" while the asian fuji guy mentioned the focus by wire aspect....
    Nikon D800 - X100 - Nikon D7000
    14 - 24 f2.8, 50 f1.4, 70-200 f2.8 VRII
  • ChristopherChristopher
    Posts: 2,550
    I suspect these drive by wire lens designs are a decisive compromise to keep them as compact as possible. M mount lenses are quite compact and fully manual, but they lack any AF mechanisms, and Nikon lenses are quite large by comparison. If you look at Micro 4/3rds lenses, they're also all drive by wire, and equally compact.

    It's tough to buy into a new platform, but I wouldn't take Fujifilm's efforts lightly. They've already spent 3 years developing the X mount platform, they're fully committed to this untapped niche in the market. Creating another 'me-too' DSLR isn't worthwhile, they tried that with their S Pro DSLRs, but creating a mirror-less camera truly for professionals is something that Nikon and Canon are clearly too afraid to do. These cameras won't be full DSLR replacements in every aspect, surely the AF will still not compare, but they will suit the needs of MANY photographers nonetheless.
    Fuji X Series Administrator · ChrisMarks.com · Space Cadet Photo Blog · Flickr
  • kiwikiwi
    Posts: 460
    Sergio said:

    Im just saying the F mont, M mount, any mount where the lens maintains manual control over at least focusing give that glass longevity because if you ever want to use it on another platform all you need is an adapter.



    And it's somehow impossible to build an adapter that connects an electrical contact on one end with an electrical contact on the other? I would have thought any first year electrical engineering student would be able to manage that.

  • ASMASM
    Posts: 1
    Really like the look & idea of the X pro 1, my only concern is that in all the videos I've watched they seem to indicate that when the lens is removed the sensor is visible. However careful I've been with my DSLR I nearly always end up with dust on the sensor at some point & thats behind a mirror! Am I missing something,does anyone know whether this is an issue with cameras of this type?
  • SergioSergio
    Posts: 362
    Not if the contact doesn't even exist on the camera or the camera doesn't have the same software to move the lens... This is a high tech lens and camera system not a potato battery.
    Nikon D800 - X100 - Nikon D7000
    14 - 24 f2.8, 50 f1.4, 70-200 f2.8 VRII
  • ArjayArjay
    Posts: 99
    Sergio said:

    Picture this... You buy the system and all of the lenses... and lets say for the sake of argument that all the lenses are $600 a piece thats a total of $4,800 on lenses alone and lets say $1,700 for the camera and kit lens, a total of at least $6,500 (thats assuming that all the new lenses cost $600 which is VERY unlikely). Then down the road Fuji develops a new faster AF system and stops supporting this version of their AF.


    With all the R&D investment that Fuji put into thios mount, I don't envision that Fuji will abandon the mount for another system anytime soon.

    Also, consider that the actual process of measuring focus and controlling the lens for the AF measuring sequence all happens (a) inside the camera body and (b ) is essentially performed in software. That is, the process can be modified by Fuji inside an existing camera system to a certain degree.

    On a further note, the mount and its electrical interface can stay the same, however Fuji could develop another camera body with an improved AF system - possibly even using a phase-detect system like in a DSLR. Such a camera body would still be able to perform AF using an older lens with the same mount because the technology to determine focus is contained in the camera body, not the lens. The lens merely contains the optics, a focus motor and a drive as well as some interface circuitry. The intelligence isn't in the lens but in the camera body.

  • SergioSergio
    Posts: 362
    Arjay said:

    Sergio said:

    Picture this... You buy the system and all of the lenses... and lets say for the sake of argument that all the lenses are $600 a piece thats a total of $4,800 on lenses alone and lets say $1,700 for the camera and kit lens, a total of at least $6,500 (thats assuming that all the new lenses cost $600 which is VERY unlikely). Then down the road Fuji develops a new faster AF system and stops supporting this version of their AF.



    With all the R&D investment that Fuji put into thios mount, I don't envision that Fuji will abandon the mount for another system anytime soon.

    Also, consider that the actual process of measuring focus and controlling the lens for the AF measuring sequence all happens (a) inside the camera body and (b ) is essentially performed in software. That is, the process can be modified by Fuji inside an existing camera system to a certain degree.

    On a further note, the mount and its electrical interface can stay the same, however Fuji could develop another camera body with an improved AF system - possibly even using a phase-detect system like in a DSLR. Such a camera body would still be able to perform AF using an older lens with the same mount because the technology to determine focus is contained in the camera body, not the lens. The lens merely contains the optics, a focus motor and a drive as well as some interface circuitry. The intelligence isn't in the lens but in the camera body.



    Your right AF does happen in camera... my problem with this system is that MF does too... The X series does not have a real manual focusing system, this was ok with the X100 but with a "pro" camera I dont like it...

    Look at nikon, their latest lenses have ditched aperture control on altogether but they know how important fast manual focusing is. So they left a focus ring on all of their lenses with an automatic manual override! To me thats pro quality knowing that if I have to adjust the focus cause the AF completely missed what I'm looking for I can just reach up and twist the ring to get the focus plane exactly where I want it.
    Nikon D800 - X100 - Nikon D7000
    14 - 24 f2.8, 50 f1.4, 70-200 f2.8 VRII
  • kiwikiwi
    Posts: 460
    ASM said:

    Really like the look & idea of the X pro 1, my only concern is that in all the videos I've watched they seem to indicate that when the lens is removed the sensor is visible. However careful I've been with my DSLR I nearly always end up with dust on the sensor at some point & thats behind a mirror! Am I missing something,does anyone know whether this is an issue with cameras of this type?



    As there is no mirror you will probably find that there is some sort of protective screen in front of the actual sensor. I guess we will have to wait for the in depth reviews for the final answer.
    I assume that all m4/3 ICL cameras plus the NEX series the Nikon 1 series and even the Leica M9 would all face the same issue and if it hadn't been resolved or was a real problem we would have well and truly heard about it by now.

  • Sergio said:

    Am I the only one thats hesitant to adopt a system that will only be relevant while this body of camera exists?

    The thing I love about my Nikons and one of the main reasons I chose Nikon over cannon is because every Nikon DSLR lens can be mounted on any Nikon DSLR, even lenses from the 80s. Nikon lenses are never truly obsolete same as leica lenses, but these new fuji lenses look great except that when this body is replaced and a hot new camera comes along with a different focusing mechanism then these lenses will be obsolete.... I dont know about you guys but I think of glass as an investment that supposed to outlive camera bodies not the other way around.



    Huh? Fuji has already mentioned a Leica adaptor. So use your precious MF leica lenses on the XPro1 with ease. :)
  • cosinaphilecosinaphile
    Posts: 1,063
    Sergio said:

    Not if the contact doesn't even exist on the camera or the camera doesn't have the same software to move the lens... This is a high tech lens and camera system not a potato battery.

    not a potato battery lololololo

    i shoot with the ricoh gxr and m mount module with adapted glass
    i shoot with the samsung ex1 and the ricoh gx 200
    i shoot with the ep1 and gf1 with adapted slr and rf glass
    i shoot with the x100 and the x10
  • cosinaphilecosinaphile
    Posts: 1,063

    I suspect these drive by wire lens designs are a decisive compromise to keep them as compact as possible. M mount lenses are quite compact and fully manual, but they lack any AF mechanisms, and Nikon lenses are quite large by comparison. If you look at Micro 4/3rds lenses, they're also all drive by wire, and equally compact.

    It's tough to buy into a new platform, but I wouldn't take Fujifilm's efforts lightly.

    They've already spent 3 years developing the X mount platform, they're fully committed to this untapped niche in the market. Creating another 'me-too' DSLR isn't worthwhile, they tried that with their S Pro DSLRs, but creating a mirror-less camera truly for professionals is something that Nikon and Canon are clearly too afraid to do. These cameras won't be full DSLR replacements in every aspect, surely the AF will still not compare, but they will suit the needs of MANY photographers nonetheless.



    i suspect its a money saving act first


    my nikon 50 1.4 full frame af lens is smaller than these lenses and aven my m 43 lenses , they could do better imho

    i shoot with the ricoh gxr and m mount module with adapted glass
    i shoot with the samsung ex1 and the ricoh gx 200
    i shoot with the ep1 and gf1 with adapted slr and rf glass
    i shoot with the x100 and the x10
  • ArjayArjay
    Posts: 99
    Sergio said:

    Your right AF does happen in camera... my problem with this system is that MF does too... The X series does not have a real manual focusing system, this was ok with the X100 but with a "pro" camera I dont like it...


    Again, the lens only contains the controls and provides electronic signals to the camera body - this also applies for the focusing ring.

    This means that the quality of the camera's response in returning focusing drive signals to the lens depends (a) on the camera's speed of reading those incoming signals and (b ) on the way it is calculating the drive signals for the focusing drive. This essentially is a software and computing problem for the camera body's hard- and software:

    The speed of the camera's reaction to turning the focus ring firstly depends on how often the camera will look at the positional signals coming from the lens, secondly on how it is interpreting these signals and thirdly how quickly the camera will respond (ideally with zero delay). E.g. if you turn the ring quickly, the camera should interpret this in such a way that it will send drive signals to the lens' focus motor that ought to move the lens in larger steps, so it will move in a higher speed thus emulating a direct mecanical link. But if you move the ring slowly, the camera should not only issue its drive signals for smaller motion steps, but also in a lower pulse rate, so that the movement will be slower, offering better control for fine adjustment.

    All of this is happening via software in the camera body. The problem we're seeing with the X100 is that Fuji didn't implement it right. I sincerely hope that they will update that specific firmware section in the X100 and optimize it for the production version of the X-Pro 1.
  • ChristopherChristopher
    Posts: 2,550
    In another CES interview it was noted that the focal lengths in the roadmap are accurate, however the apertures are subject to change. It was also accidentally let slip that a 14mm f/1.4 is due out in 2012!
    Fuji X Series Administrator · ChrisMarks.com · Space Cadet Photo Blog · Flickr
  • SergioSergio
    Posts: 362
    Arjay said:

    Sergio said:

    Your right AF does happen in camera... my problem with this system is that MF does too... The X series does not have a real manual focusing system, this was ok with the X100 but with a "pro" camera I dont like it...


    Again, the lens only contains the controls and provides electronic signals to the camera body - this also applies for the focusing ring.

    This means that the quality of the camera's response in returning focusing drive signals to the lens depends (a) on the camera's speed of reading those incoming signals and (b ) on the way it is calculating the drive signals for the focusing drive. This essentially is a software and computing problem for the camera body's hard- and software:

    The speed of the camera's reaction to turning the focus ring firstly depends on how often the camera will look at the positional signals coming from the lens, secondly on how it is interpreting these signals and thirdly how quickly the camera will respond (ideally with zero delay). E.g. if you turn the ring quickly, the camera should interpret this in such a way that it will send drive signals to the lens' focus motor that ought to move the lens in larger steps, so it will move in a higher speed thus emulating a direct mecanical link. But if you move the ring slowly, the camera should not only issue its drive signals for smaller motion steps, but also in a lower pulse rate, so that the movement will be slower, offering better control for fine adjustment.

    All of this is happening via software in the camera body. The problem we're seeing with the X100 is that Fuji didn't implement it right. I sincerely hope that they will update that specific firmware section in the X100 and optimize it for the production version of the X-Pro 1.



    Yeah in paper it looks great... but then again so does communism.

    Heres to hoping Im wrong and the AF on this is way better than the x100. Im gonna hold off on the pre order though until I see it in action.
    Nikon D800 - X100 - Nikon D7000
    14 - 24 f2.8, 50 f1.4, 70-200 f2.8 VRII
  • LarryLarry
    Posts: 307
    I even use a half-press with the D700—long time habit. With the X100, a moment more of anticipation does the trick. When I anticipate a decisive-moment, I make the camera focus, then wait for the moment. Simply not an issue even if focus speed is dead slow like the first bridge cameras. The X100—and X-Pro—are much faster than the 2002 Nikon Coolpix 5000, but I had no problem nailing the point of ignition and lift-off of high-power rockets with it. A matter of basic technique. Learn to focus and the issue goes away entirely.

    High-power Rocket Launches
  • I'f I were to purchase any of this system I would probably just get the body and the inevitable MD adapter. I have a lot of good Minolta glass and ever mirrorless system has a third party attachment for it. New lenses that work on an already obsolete method of autofocus are of no use to me.

    Sergio, according to some hands on by Gizmodo and Engadet it is slow to autofocus, just like the x100 and the Nex and all the other compacts. Trust your cynical side.
  • cosinaphilecosinaphile
    Posts: 1,063
    that would be a shame
    i shoot with the ricoh gxr and m mount module with adapted glass
    i shoot with the samsung ex1 and the ricoh gx 200
    i shoot with the ep1 and gf1 with adapted slr and rf glass
    i shoot with the x100 and the x10
  • artmartm
    Posts: 134
    Didn't the "official" Fuji video say that AF was always "under 1 second". Well, if you can live with that limitation then you're OK, buy it. I can't.

    If AF is unreliable but you can use MF glass then you're also OK.

    Perhaps that second scenario is the best: you get the benefit of Fuji's new sensor capabilities, quality glass and MF.

    Gee, sort of like a real rangefinder but more modern.
  • While I'm excited about this camera from an aesthetic and practical standpoint, the lens road map leaves me a bit cold. Nikon is rumored to be developing at least half a dozen lenses for their (admittedly not great) "1" system. Say what you will about that system, the lenses are built to typical Nikon quality standards. I hope Fuji is serious about the "high quality" of the X line throughout the range of lenses and accessories!

    Even though the market is probably different, I do think it's going to be hard to compete with the Sony NEX-7 and all its hype (Dpreview's Gold Award, Popular Photography's "Camera of the Year" etc.). How many of these new camera systems can the market really support?
  • artmartm
    Posts: 134
    I agree, people are excited for this model because of the aesthetics. I would say overly excited to ignore potentially serious flaws, especially with MF. Now I see there's no diopter adjustment on this thing? Stupid!

    There are plenty of choices in today's market, I can't imagine one not finding something to his liking. Of course, that doesn't mean it will be the perfect camera, just good enough.

    If the X-Pro was suitable for sports photography I would be tempted to buy it. This means ultra fast AF, a 70-200 zoom and high fps. It is not so I'll happily use my D300 until it dies.

    I do love my X10 which is almost perfect: not as small as my Leica D-Lux 4 but better in other aspects; so it's more than good enough for me.
  • kiwikiwi
    Posts: 460
    artm said:

    Now I see there's no diopter adjustment on this thing? Stupid!



    But you have the ability to have either a standard screw on adjustment lens or a custom screw on lens or a heap of screw on lens accessories. Fuji have made it quite plain right from the start that there was no diopter adjustment and have explained the reason why.
    The X-Pro1 and any camera in that style is never in it's widest dreams going to be suitable for action sports photography but where it will probably shine is to COMPLIMENT a DSLR system for team and player candids on the sideline.

  • artmartm
    Posts: 134
    Is the screw on standard or "Fuji standard"? Considering the high cost of this body, I expect to have this convenience.

    Who knows...the third iteration of this model may come close to being ideal for sports. Now, I don't mean best for sports - as in AF tracking players - but good enough.

    As for a complimentary DSLR system, nope. I'm not about to carry multiple lenses just to use this body, would rather just buy another DSLR. I would thnk my X10 is better suited for that purpose.
  • mattmabermattmaber
    Posts: 3,971
    yeah its no sports cam. Personally I'm pleased. I don't want A N Other camera like that, there's plenty out there.
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  • kiwikiwi
    Posts: 460
    artm said:

    Is the screw on standard or "Fuji standard"? Considering the high cost of this body, I expect to have this convenience.



    I think that you will find that it's like the thread on the shutter release and that any old lens hoods or magnifiers or right angle viewers or whatever that you have left over from the film days will work perfectly. The Fuji video made a point of saying that you would be able to use accessory shades and the like.

  • jacjac
    Posts: 675
    So the big question, is - will Fuji bring out a FULL-FRAME version of the X-Pro1?

    b/c if they do, it would make all these APS-C image circle lenses completely redundant

    if they're not and completely believe that optimising the APS-C on future developments is the way to go, ie. more DR, more resolution etc.. then it would convince a lot of people on the fence
  • cosinaphilecosinaphile
    Posts: 1,063
    the instruction book of the x pro mentions cosina branded diopters
    i shoot with the ricoh gxr and m mount module with adapted glass
    i shoot with the samsung ex1 and the ricoh gx 200
    i shoot with the ep1 and gf1 with adapted slr and rf glass
    i shoot with the x100 and the x10
  • jac said:

    So the big question, is - will Fuji bring out a FULL-FRAME version of the X-Pro1?



    I don't think so, as the image quality IS already on full-frame level quality wise. It'll be cool to get more adapter rings for M42 or likewise.
  • jacjac
    Posts: 675
    why hasn't Fuji made a statement on this?

    people just want to know fuji will not abandon or upgrade the line and make their investments go down the pipe

    the other consideration is DOF isolation/control, much more on a FF. eg. a 35mm f1.4 APS-C lens is equivalent to a 53mm f2.1 lens on FF

    if they do offer a full-frame or larger sensor camera it will more than likely be a different line. say, a medium format equivalent resolution in a small package..
  • mattmabermattmaber
    Posts: 3,971
    jac said:

    So the big question, is - will Fuji bring out a FULL-FRAME version of the X-Pro1?


    Im gonna go with NO. but as an addendum .. stop stressing FFS.
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  • WilzWorkz7WilzWorkz7
    Posts: 1,761
    i know this is a rhetorical question about Fujifilm going full frame.

    I will think NO because Fujifilm has lead the pack in the APS-C sensor and from that perspective, it is leading the pack in the beginner to serious amateur to even semi-professional market (that's me). So for them to go FF when Nikon and Canon is leading ain't going be doing anything positive for them unless they have a Full Frame sensor that can lead both of them and that itself would take lots of time and company resources.

    FJF is picking the right fight because Canon and Nikon has basically abandoned the serious APS-C users (that's me) and have seen the pent up frustration with the lack of D300/300s upgrade and the not so there D7000 (which Nikon management may think it is a worthy upgrade to the D300s which is not unfortunately). As for Canon they have the 7D but is worse off than the 40D/60D in some ways hence their APS-C is under-served as well.

    Plus the fact that the market is clamouring for APS-C quality in a MFT sized system, FJF is hitting the right notes at the moment.

    And they should keep hitting the right notes until all the lens for the system is out. From zooms to 24mm primes (35mm equivalent) and other lens that will at least cover the range of shooting possibilities. It would be in their interests too if FJF can get 3rd party lens makers such as Tokina (Panasonic owned), Sigma and Tamron to support. The market is also responding with adaptors which is a good thing.

    Hence I hope FJF concentrate on getting the X Mount running good before going FF. Nikon and Canon don't have much time left.
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  • mattmabermattmaber
    Posts: 3,971


    Hence I hope FJF concentrate on getting the X Mount running good before going FF. Nikon and Canon don't have much time left.



    I don't think "before FF" is on FJF agenda. There is no FF in FJF future so far as I can see. THey like APS-C as their "pro" sensor and are sticking their flag to that mast.
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  • Interesting debate.. I regularly use an old Nikon 50mm 1.2 on my D300, and other old glass. I struggle to get this pin sharp sometimes and so I bracket focus alot. I have been amazed at the autofocus on the X-Pro 1. Sooo sharp even wide open - I have complete faith in it. Ok, so its not infallible but what is? As to whether or not these lenses will be redundant in ? years, who knows? Shoot what you can with what you have now..
    X-Pro1, 35mm, 18mm. Nikon D800, D300, D100, AFD 80-200 2.8, 105mm 2.8 macro, 85mm 1.8, 50mm 1.2, 35mm 2.0, 24mm 2.8, 12-24mm 4.0
  • pelstonpelston
    Posts: 1
    I have read this forum from top to bottom, and I have a couple of thoughts:

    1. I'm not a paid pro. The camera I shoot doesn't have to be all things to all people. What my camera has to do is deliver great images for my type of shooting, assist in the photographic process (or at the very least, not detract too much) and feel right.

    2. The market for the xPro-1 might be different than people think. I just sold my d300s rig because I'm tired of carrying around and shooting with a bowling ball. Yeah, I got great images, but I found myself carrying the rig less, and more importantly, wanting to shoot less because of the size and weight.

    3. I'm not wealthy by any stretch, and I cant afford all three lenses right now, but I want to try this system, and I'm willing to make the switch.

    4. For those of you who have gotten all excited about things you don't like...don't worry, I'm very comfortable with my choice, and I'll live with the consequences. I'd never consider an M8, but there are guys shooting them and loving them. I liked my d300s and the d200 before it. Now, I expect I'll enjoy my x-Pro1.

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