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what? No, a blurred image has nothing to do with writing on the card. That would look like wild color artefacts or something..

I also had my green indicator always okay, while 25% were blurred, so its definately a defect, send it in!

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You might be surprised at how many of these focus problems turn out to be user mistakes even from long time photographers when they begin with Fuji. Often it's a simple one such as focus box too large or too small (not in the case of landscape). Sometimes a user has forgotten to or not realised their camera is switched to eye or face detect, though the the small bpxes floating around the screen should alert them.

Also, in spite of Artuk's attempts to blacken the reputation of Fuji cameras, it should be no secret that Artuk's only Fuji was an early XP1 - with no actual Fuji experience since - Artuk shoots Sony and although knowledgeable about photography in general he is as prone to to picking up only on the few "disaster stories" which float about - the same stories repeated on several forums at once. Users don't repeatedly go online saying how good their camera is and how they've had trouble free service, so it's easy to think that problems are greater and more prevalent than they actually are.

There's no doubt that cameras generally and perhaps mirrorless cameras in particular are more prone to problems because there is so much automation and overriding of that automation demanded by modern users so once in the field they need make no decisions. I read of problems with Nikon bodies - and lenses - all the time and wonder what has happened to them since my last Nikons D3S, D700, D300. Perfect cameras but too heavy for me now. Sometimes it seems that Nikon AF has gone backward yet the I know that is not so and the latest D500, D750, D5, etc are super fast and super accurate. Users are so much more demanding these days. Many, and this is not a put down - have come up from P&S and even more from iphones where everything is taken care of and there demands have forced camera companies to develop more and faster -  a good thing for them but less so for me who was happy shooting more manual cameras for over 50 yrs. However, I'm the past and Fuji etc don't make so much from me now (they made a bundle over last few years though), Fuji makes money from new users.

Anyway, If you followed forums for users of cameras of all makes you would find that all makers have some problems and despite Johnnywilliam's report of his dealings with Fuji UK (probably and reportedly the very best of repair services in the industry) Fuji actually have no more "real problems" than any other camera/lens producer.

I have original X-Pro1, X-E1 (converted IR), XT1, XT2 and now XT20. Only the XT1 was sold to allow purchase of XT2, the XP1 is still my fave for street but may have to go to avoid the wrath of 'er indoors (my dear lady wife who may not know the difference between cameras but she can count).

BTW, Adrian (Artuk) and I get along fine but our opinions on equipment sometimes differ.

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dont know Artuk but i can tell you that my brand new XT2 had 25% blurred images with 3 lenses, with very considerately chosen high contrast motifs. So no bullshit or silly things like AF box too big (it was small) or whatever. Just no excuses really. They fixed it without admitting so. Gave me some BS back "the lens is the problem not the cam". Well, it was the camera. Never had similar issues with the (pertty bad) AF on the Canon 5DII, just to mention that.

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13 minutes ago, huck222 said:

dont know Artuk but i can tell you that my brand new XT2 had 25% blurred images with 3 lenses, with very considerately chosen high contrast motifs. So no bullshit or silly things like AF box too big (it was small) or whatever. Just no excuses really. They fixed it without admitting so. Gave me some BS back "the lens is the problem not the cam". Well, it was the camera. Never had similar issues with the (pertty bad) AF on the Canon 5DII, just to mention that.

I think you prove my point with your remark about the Canon. All the complaints yet you had no trouble. I couldn't believe that the AF would be worse than previous iterations of that model - same with Nikon. Some of it is expectation, some is user error and of course, some is actual poor manufacture but I don't think things are worse - a greater number of cameras and the reporting of problems is wider and louder.

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its a litte different. with canon, WHEN the Af locked, then it was in focus. So the Camera didnt fool itself and/or me. With my XT2 sample, that happened. Confirmed AF lock was wrong in 25-30%. That is a different story now, isnt it?? What did i prove?

Then take the distance indicator, which jumps around from 3 m to infinite on a very clear object. Its just a big malfunction, isnt it.

And about those custumor errors and expectations: i just want my camera not to lie to me, plain and simple. Its ridiculous to explain this.

So: The Canon AF (up to the 5D Mark II) had its weaknesses, but didnt lie. Not to this extent. Lets keep the problems specific.

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If you look at the kind of blurr, it's difficult to imagine user mistake, above all when the next one taken in the same condition is perfect, it's really a random failure of the electronic .598448388415d__DSF18521.jpg.9d7538037aa66488c800d3dc686f6f6b.jpg

Correct picture in the same conditions (1/1000S f/5.6 iso 200) only difference is Velvia mode instead of standard for the first.59844b054e971__DSF18531.jpg.621b13b21f4e7df7ef5ab0d24223a520.jpg

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7 hours ago, veejaycee said:

Also, in spite of Artuk's attempts to blacken the reputation of Fuji cameras, it should be no secret that Artuk's only Fuji was an early XP1 - with no actual Fuji experience since - Artuk shoots Sony and although knowledgeable about photography in general he is as prone to to picking up only on the few "disaster stories" which float about - the same stories repeated on several forums at once. Users don't repeatedly go online saying how good their camera is and how they've had trouble free service, so it's easy to think that problems are greater and more prevalent than they actually are.

 

BTW, Adrian (Artuk) and I get along fine but our opinions on equipment sometimes differ.

Hi VJC, you may not believe me, but I wasn't trying to make unsubstantiated claims to try and blacken Fuji's reputation.  My experience with the X Pro 1 was what it was, and I make no claims that I own any of the newer cameras (the newest one I've used with the X-M1).  The issue about the shutter not firing was reported in Amateur Photographer, in response to a letter asking for technical help, where the editorial response was that there was an issue and Fuji were reported to be looking into it.  The issue about the focus distance scale is an X100 issue caused by a firmware update that reportedly Fuji has acknowledged and is looking into.  I freely admit the other issues such as focusing, lens problems etc are mostly user reports here or other places, and I know that "internet amplification syndrome" can appear to exaggerate problems. 

I don't want to talk about other brands here (i.e. name names) as some people become very emotional about it, but it's no secret I use other cameras and my only Fuji camera is an original X100.  All camera systems have issues from time to time - Sony have a bit of a reputation for alignment problems with some of their E mount lenses, which has affected me on 3 occasions, although the problems seem to be getting better with newer models - but I always advise people to buy from a reputable dealer where they can return lenses for exchange because of the issues.  The cameras have had fewer problems (in the sense of "bugs") but there are a few operational curiosities - but certainly not problems introduced by updates that affect stability, focusing etc.

I do agree that there can be elements of user error because the focusing systems are different on SLRs and mirrorless, and with great respect some users are very uninformed about the operation and technology inside their cameras, which can lead to user error.

As an outsider looking in, it does *feel* as if Fuji have gone backwards after a period of dealing with these types of problems: indeed some of these issues such as focus scale and focus creep are similar to previous issues that were introduced by firmware updates, and previously fixed. 

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While I'd prefer to really not delve into this topic with a raised hand saying 'me too' , I think I have some anecdotal evidence that, after this thread, made me look into my picture library a bit more closely. There have been instances where the focus seems to be off, even when I know I tried to focus on a certain artifact in the frame. 

While I see estimates of 25-30% here, looking at my shots I have a lower number, around 8% is the number I see to be out of focus. I mostly attributed that to my technique rather than any AF issues, but there have been a couple of instances where I distinctly couldn't figure out why the shot was off kilter, since I used (AFAIK) correct technique or at least, no different technique than other pictures in the same series. 

I think this may be correctable in a firmware update (perhaps) and, so, given my current (non) hit rate, I am not concerned. I wonder if certain settings exacerbate the problem, but I will let you pros do that analysis. :)

 

And Artuk, buy a Fuji XT2 already , you are here on this forum, you clearly like our company, whats a couple of thousand dollars for having a good conversation with friends? ;) 

 

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6 hours ago, JPaul said:

If you look at the kind of blurr, it's difficult to imagine user mistake, above all when the next one taken in the same condition is perfect, it's really a random failure of the electronic .598448388415d__DSF18521.jpg.9d7538037aa66488c800d3dc686f6f6b.jpg

Correct picture in the same conditions (1/1000S f/5.6 iso 200) only difference is Velvia mode instead of standard for the first.59844b054e971__DSF18531.jpg.621b13b21f4e7df7ef5ab0d24223a520.jpg

It's hard to tell from these sized samples - is ANYTHING in the  blurred picture in focus (from near camera to horizon)?  It doesn't appear to be, but it's very hard to tell.

I've come across examples with mirrorless cameras where they will completely fail to focus at random, sometimes not focus locking at all, or sometimes focusing but not on the thing the focus box appear to be pointed at.

One thing to consider, does the camera have an AF / Shutter priority feature?  In some systems, the camera can be configured to release the shutter when pressed, even if focus has not been locked (it's more appropriate with continuous AF and continuous shooting).  If turned on, and the shutter was pressed before a successful AF cycle, it can cause out of focus problems.

1 hour ago, raagamuffin said:

And Artuk, buy a Fuji XT2 already , you are here on this forum, you clearly like our company, whats a couple of thousand dollars for having a good conversation with friends? ;) 

 

The price of a similarly sized full frame mirrorless camera? ;-)

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10 minutes ago, artuk said:

It's hard to tell from these sized samples - is ANYTHING in the  blurred picture in focus (from near camera to horizon)?  It doesn't appear to be, but it's very hard to tell.

I've come across examples with mirrorless cameras where they will completely fail to focus at random, sometimes not focus locking at all, or sometimes focusing but not on the thing the focus box appear to be pointed at.

One thing to consider, does the camera have an AF / Shutter priority feature?  In some systems, the camera can be configured to release the shutter when pressed, even if focus has not been locked (it's more appropriate with continuous AF and continuous shooting).  If turned on, and the shutter was pressed before a successful AF cycle, it can cause out of focus problems.

 

10 minutes ago, artuk said:

It's hard to tell from these sized samples - is ANYTHING in the  blurred picture in focus (from near camera to horizon)?  It doesn't appear to be, but it's very hard to tell.

I've come across examples with mirrorless cameras where they will completely fail to focus at random, sometimes not focus locking at all, or sometimes focusing but not on the thing the focus box appear to be pointed at.

One thing to consider, does the camera have an AF / Shutter priority feature?  In some systems, the camera can be configured to release the shutter when pressed, even if focus has not been locked (it's more appropriate with continuous AF and continuous shooting).  If turned on, and the shutter was pressed before a successful AF cycle, it can cause out of focus problems.

 

6 hours ago, JPaul said:

If you look at the kind of blurr, it's difficult to imagine user mistake, above all when the next one taken in the same condition is perfect, it's really a random failure of the electronic .598448388415d__DSF18521.jpg.9d7538037aa66488c800d3dc686f6f6b.jpg

Correct picture in the same conditions (1/1000S f/5.6 iso 200) only difference is Velvia mode instead of standard for the first.59844b054e971__DSF18531.jpg.621b13b21f4e7df7ef5ab0d24223a520.jpg

I have to say that neither of these appears sharp to me even at this very small size (or maybe because of the small size). The Velvia has more contrast which has a small effect on apparent sharpness as would be expected but still not enough for me to say it was sharp.

Ignore the first 2 quotes - don't what happened there.

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2 hours ago, JPaul said:

Yes need to crop !!_DSF1852-crop.jpg.af5ddc6146e99f60107f04206e21b2dc.jpg_DSF1853-crop.jpg.070429d6186cad7bcae8824711fd0048.jpg 

5984b16eea8c8__DSF1852-crop1.jpg.77aac5fe06d35dcbf4138fb23537d7ac.jpg5984b19fd9af4__DSF1853-crop1.jpg.76c12918c49198f85b44494851737953.jpgOn other zone...

So the first one, neither the horizon nor the near field is sharp?  If you have checked the shutter release priority, and this is happening regularly, and you are confident that it's not camera shake etc, then I can only suggest returning the camera and lens to Fuji for a warranty repair.  Does this only happen with a particular lens, or any?

edit: do you use OSS - was it on for these shots?  I have seen examples on other systems where lens based stabilisation systems can randomly cause problems with sharpness, because some elements in the lens are "floating" and able to move around - some times they move incorrectly, during exposure.  I've got no evidence this happens with Fuji's system (never experienced it with my 18-55mm), but other systems definitely can exhibit this random problem.  Some people turn OSS type systems off when light is good, as they believe the lenses are better with the elements "parked".

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Only with AF priority and no OSS...It can happen with any lens when focusing long distance.

 

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Have had xt1 for a few years and now never use AF on any nature or landscape shots.  I quickly discovered how temperamental the AF was with these genres and stopped using it.  Does not bother me.  I bought Fuji for quality build, size, ergonomics, design (top plate dials) and lens quality and the options for simplicity. Am an old fusty and so content with manual speed, aperture, ISO, a histogram and manual focus.  Generally when shooting landscape one is not in a 'quick-grab-it' situation indeed just how often is one in that situation regardless of genre.   To focus manually takes but a couple of seconds and with the zoom-in facility when touching the focus ring you have got nailed.  Generally I have a deep mistrust of auto this and that when taking a photo preferring to make my own decisions.  The last decades have seen manufacturers adding new electronic gadgets every year, most of which one need not use and often never use, to sell new models and have pushed complex electionics to fragile limits. However when taking street or family shots I have found AF more reliable.  

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I agree with you Custy for that intelligent way to do...But on another aspect it's a pity to pay more and have less ! 

With the X-T1 I was more confident using af, never such big problems.
Marketing rules  need impressive numbers, more pixels, AF faster and faster !!  fortunately Fuji has others arguments with lens quality, jpegs and features...

Thank you to make me discover at the same time Banley X séries Tips and tricks !

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I founf the Af of the XT1 was excellent once mastered. However there is a special feeling about using a good manual focus lens. No moving focus point or focus recompose just simple magnified view is great - on any Fuji camera. I use my XP1 & XE1 mostly in manual focus. If I need fast AF I have an XT2 and now an XT20 - which is much nicer to user with small Fuji primes so I may try some of my remaining adapted MF lenses on it, however, the VF is smaller than I like for manual focus.

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Hello again ! 

Since I identified the problem and posted on the forum, I tried to pay much more attention when the xt2 focuses. I change more often the AF mode (single point / zone / wide). I am on a bicycle trip so I take much more landscape now, but I realize the XT2 can have a lot of difficulties focusing on a landscape. I have a moving subject (my wife on a bike) in the landscape so I don't have so much time to wait until the XT2 decides to focus properly.

By using the wide AF mode, one can "understand" the camera and where/how it focuses. And one would realize that it sometimes really struggles to focus on something in a landscape... I used to mainly use "single point" focus, and I now understand why it can be a bad idea in a landscape... But I am still not happy because even with wide AF mode, some pictures are still blurry... I am very disappointed.... Every time I take a shot now, I check it by zooming a lot and even with that technique, I cannot check 100% of my pictures.... argghhh !

I need advice because I will be back in France in april 2018, but I would like to send it back to Fuji or to have it checked. But I really need my camera to achieve my bicycle project. We are going to China, Thailand, might go to Australia and finally Japan (but it would be the last country). Do you think I can have it checked/replace quickly in those country ? For me, traveling without the camera is not an option. Do you know how long last the Fuji warranty ? When I am back home, the camera would have been bought for more than 1 year. 

Thank you all

Attached file (jpg from xt2) : the kind of pictures, my XT2 struggle with... so annoying because it is a mix of landscape and bike, so bikes don't stop for the "perfect picture and framing"...

DSCF3490.JPG

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I am far from an expert with the X-T2 (mine arrived less than two weeks ago), but it seems that your aperture for this photograph was f/7.1 (according to the EXIF data).  This does not offer great DOF, so I wonder why you were not using f/11, at least?

When I photograph landscapes such as this I try to generally focus at about 1/3 of the distance, in order to get as much in focus as possible.  This works well for me even with the 90mm f/2 lens.  And I almost always use single point for AF.

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How do you manage to focus 1/3 of the distance? Manually? (So it means you don't use the AF), or otherwise you need to use point or zone AF which is exactly my problem ;-) I cannot trust it. Before the problem I used to shot only with point or zone AF. 

I have never had any problems with my x100 with "wide" aperture. I tried to shoot at f11 event smaller, but it does not solve the problem... 

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I use single point AF, with the size of the box set to about 3.  From what you are saying, it may well be that your X-T2 is faulty.

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The problem is about the AF, on the picture there is no focus point. All the image is blurry whereas the fuji "managed" to focus... The DOF /Aperture is supposed to control the sharp area. The problem we face is that the AF does not work properly... 

Just now, merlin said:

I use single point AF, with the size of the box set to about 3.

OK, that is the way I would like to use my xt2. But AF is not working correctly. If you use wide AF mode, one can see it struggles to find a location to focus.

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To focus 1/3 in to the scene either use back button AFL or half press shutter at 1/3 and recompose.

First, do you have the latest August 8 firmware? http://www.fujifilm.com/support/digital_cameras/software/firmware/x/xt2/download.html

It does deal with focus problems.

The picture above from what I can see is taken on a misty day with no contrast in the background - to me it looks sharp - just misty. The DoF is such that sharpness appears to begin just before the bend in the track to infinity which is about what I would expect. May I suggest with 55mm lens, f8, focus at 20M. This will give a DoF from 10M to infinity. F5.6 focus 30M for DoF 15M to inf. F11, focus 15M, DoF 7M to inf. Obviously with a wider lens DoF will increase and by 35mm and f5.6 you can focus at 12m for DoF 6M to inf

This link will take you to DoF master where you can input your settings for any focal length, aperture and subject distance. Download the app there for PC, Mac, Android, iphone.

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I downloaded today the v2.11,i will try in the coming days and let you know. 

I took a few shot at the same position, and I have a lot of examples like this. The misty impression comes from the underexposition. I managed to get a few ones which are orrectly focused. 

I know how to focus 1/3, the problem comes the AF. I had a Nikon d90 and a fuji x100. I used to take pictures exactly as you described (Focus point where I want the focus and sometimes reframing). But if the AF is not correct, no need to use the button AFL, or shutter button. Do you know what I mean? 

I understand perfectly the DoF theory, but to my mind this is not the problem. 

Unfortunately I erased all my blurry pictures (I am traveling so I need to sort quickly my pictures) , I had dozens of examples! The xt2 says it is focused, you take the shot and you realized it is blurry. 

Here is a page which describe the problem :

https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/59776315

 

 

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A slightly random thought, but another user reported problems with focusing with his 55-200mm lens.

From what he reported, when he had the aperture stopped down, the camera focuses at open aperture, then stops down.  In some lens designs, this is known to cause "focus shift".  He found it most noticeable when close focused, as obviously with more distant focus, the added depth of field when the camera stops the lens down may mask any shift in focus position.

After quite a lot of testing, he returned the camera and lens to Fuji in his country, and it was returned as "working to spec".

Is there a chance his findings were a different version of the same problem? (I can't remember which camera body he was using - the discussion thread is here somewhere).

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