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I normally shoot RAW+JPG and use the backup functionality of X-Pro2/X-T2 to have some peace of mind when traveling or shooting weddings. I currently have 4x32GB backed up to a 128GB card per camera, but card management had became an issue.

I was thinking in switching to a 128GB backed to another 128GB per camera, since its already backing up, I do not see a problem.... but what do you think? would I risk too much with this?

Thanks

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Very roughly that is going to give you around 2000 RAW+Jpeg shots per card. How often do you have 2000 photos on a card that have not been downloaded to a computer?

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I do not travel or shot weddings carrying a computer. I know the math, I do shoot normally 2-6K on travels, 1-3K on weddings.

Just want to know if its safe to use single 128 instead of 4x32 so I can simplify. 

Right now I carry 384GB (with 384GB backup) and that is 12x32 and 3x128

If I switch to128's I will need only 6 cards..... or maybe 6x64 + 3x128 (backup)  I will need only 9.

Some people swear not to use large cards and use several small ones instead to avoid risking the data all at once (in case of corrupt card, stolen/lost card) but its getting complicated to manage 15 SD cards per travel. Also changing cards can be problematic while traveling.

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10 hours ago, JMA said:

Just want to know if its safe to use single 128 instead of 4x32 so I can simplify. 

 

The maths is really complicated and way too hard for a dummy like me to figure out.

If you use 4 x 32GB cards and you lose one you lose 500 images but still have 1500 images usable compared to using 1 x 128GB card and if you lose the card you lose all 2000 images. However, statistically and this is where the maths gets hard if you are using 4 cards you will in theory be far, far more likely to suffer a failure than if you use only one card.

They are your cards, your customer photos which presumably generate an income for you and it has to be your decision. Go with the option that makes you most comfortable.

BTW. Discount theft as a problem. If somebody is going to steal your gear they will steal all your gear not just one SD card.

 

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