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Christopher

Fujifilm X Mount Lens Road Map 2012-2013

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As there is no mirror you will probably find that there is some sort of protective screen in front of the actual sensor. I guess we will have to wait for the in depth reviews for the final answer.

I assume that all m4/3 ICL cameras plus the NEX series the Nikon 1 series and even the Leica M9 would all face the same issue and if it hadn't been resolved or was a real problem we would have well and truly heard about it by now.

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Am I the only one thats hesitant to adopt a system that will only be relevant while this body of camera exists?

The thing I love about my Nikons and one of the main reasons I chose Nikon over cannon is because every Nikon DSLR lens can be mounted on any Nikon DSLR, even lenses from the 80s. Nikon lenses are never truly obsolete same as leica lenses, but these new fuji lenses look great except that when this body is replaced and a hot new camera comes along with a different focusing mechanism then these lenses will be obsolete.... I dont know about you guys but I think of glass as an investment that supposed to outlive camera bodies not the other way around.

Huh? Fuji has already mentioned a Leica adaptor. So use your precious MF leica lenses on the XPro1 with ease. :)

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Not if the contact doesn't even exist on the camera or the camera doesn't have the same software to move the lens... This is a high tech lens and camera system not a potato battery.

not a potato battery lololololo

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I suspect these drive by wire lens designs are a decisive compromise to keep them as compact as possible. M mount lenses are quite compact and fully manual, but they lack any AF mechanisms, and Nikon lenses are quite large by comparison. If you look at Micro 4/3rds lenses, they're also all drive by wire, and equally compact.

It's tough to buy into a new platform, but I wouldn't take Fujifilm's efforts lightly.

They've already spent 3 years developing the X mount platform, they're fully committed to this untapped niche in the market. Creating another 'me-too' DSLR isn't worthwhile, they tried that with their S Pro DSLRs, but creating a mirror-less camera truly for professionals is something that Nikon and Canon are clearly too afraid to do. These cameras won't be full DSLR replacements in every aspect, surely the AF will still not compare, but they will suit the needs of MANY photographers nonetheless.

i suspect its a money saving act first

my nikon 50 1.4 full frame af lens is smaller than these lenses and aven my m 43 lenses , they could do better imho

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Your right AF does happen in camera... my problem with this system is that MF does too... The X series does not have a real manual focusing system, this was ok with the X100 but with a "pro" camera I dont like it...

Again, the lens only contains the controls and provides electronic signals to the camera body - this also applies for the focusing ring.

This means that the quality of the camera's response in returning focusing drive signals to the lens depends (a) on the camera's speed of reading those incoming signals and (b ) on the way it is calculating the drive signals for the focusing drive. This essentially is a software and computing problem for the camera body's hard- and software:

The speed of the camera's reaction to turning the focus ring firstly depends on how often the camera will look at the positional signals coming from the lens, secondly on how it is interpreting these signals and thirdly how quickly the camera will respond (ideally with zero delay). E.g. if you turn the ring quickly, the camera should interpret this in such a way that it will send drive signals to the lens' focus motor that ought to move the lens in larger steps, so it will move in a higher speed thus emulating a direct mecanical link. But if you move the ring slowly, the camera should not only issue its drive signals for smaller motion steps, but also in a lower pulse rate, so that the movement will be slower, offering better control for fine adjustment.

All of this is happening via software in the camera body. The problem we're seeing with the X100 is that Fuji didn't implement it right. I sincerely hope that they will update that specific firmware section in the X100 and optimize it for the production version of the X-Pro 1.

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In another CES interview it was noted that the focal lengths in the roadmap are accurate, however the apertures are subject to change. It was also accidentally let slip that a 14mm f/1.4 is due out in 2012!

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Your right AF does happen in camera... my problem with this system is that MF does too... The X series does not have a real manual focusing system, this was ok with the X100 but with a "pro" camera I dont like it...

Again, the lens only contains the controls and provides electronic signals to the camera body - this also applies for the focusing ring.

This means that the quality of the camera's response in returning focusing drive signals to the lens depends (a) on the camera's speed of reading those incoming signals and (b ) on the way it is calculating the drive signals for the focusing drive. This essentially is a software and computing problem for the camera body's hard- and software:

The speed of the camera's reaction to turning the focus ring firstly depends on how often the camera will look at the positional signals coming from the lens, secondly on how it is interpreting these signals and thirdly how quickly the camera will respond (ideally with zero delay). E.g. if you turn the ring quickly, the camera should interpret this in such a way that it will send drive signals to the lens' focus motor that ought to move the lens in larger steps, so it will move in a higher speed thus emulating a direct mecanical link. But if you move the ring slowly, the camera should not only issue its drive signals for smaller motion steps, but also in a lower pulse rate, so that the movement will be slower, offering better control for fine adjustment.

All of this is happening via software in the camera body. The problem we're seeing with the X100 is that Fuji didn't implement it right. I sincerely hope that they will update that specific firmware section in the X100 and optimize it for the production version of the X-Pro 1.

Yeah in paper it looks great... but then again so does communism.

Heres to hoping Im wrong and the AF on this is way better than the x100. Im gonna hold off on the pre order though until I see it in action.

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I even use a half-press with the D700—long time habit. With the X100, a moment more of anticipation does the trick. When I anticipate a decisive-moment, I make the camera focus, then wait for the moment. Simply not an issue even if focus speed is dead slow like the first bridge cameras. The X100—and X-Pro—are much faster than the 2002 Nikon Coolpix 5000, but I had no problem nailing the point of ignition and lift-off of high-power rockets with it. A matter of basic technique. Learn to focus and the issue goes away entirely.

High-power Rocket Launches

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I'f I were to purchase any of this system I would probably just get the body and the inevitable MD adapter. I have a lot of good Minolta glass and ever mirrorless system has a third party attachment for it. New lenses that work on an already obsolete method of autofocus are of no use to me.

Sergio, according to some hands on by Gizmodo and Engadet it is slow to autofocus, just like the x100 and the Nex and all the other compacts. Trust your cynical side.

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Didn't the "official" Fuji video say that AF was always "under 1 second". Well, if you can live with that limitation then you're OK, buy it. I can't.

If AF is unreliable but you can use MF glass then you're also OK.

Perhaps that second scenario is the best: you get the benefit of Fuji's new sensor capabilities, quality glass and MF.

Gee, sort of like a real rangefinder but more modern.

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While I'm excited about this camera from an aesthetic and practical standpoint, the lens road map leaves me a bit cold. Nikon is rumored to be developing at least half a dozen lenses for their (admittedly not great) "1" system. Say what you will about that system, the lenses are built to typical Nikon quality standards. I hope Fuji is serious about the "high quality" of the X line throughout the range of lenses and accessories!

Even though the market is probably different, I do think it's going to be hard to compete with the Sony NEX-7 and all its hype (Dpreview's Gold Award, Popular Photography's "Camera of the Year" etc.). How many of these new camera systems can the market really support?

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I agree, people are excited for this model because of the aesthetics. I would say overly excited to ignore potentially serious flaws, especially with MF. Now I see there's no diopter adjustment on this thing? Stupid!

There are plenty of choices in today's market, I can't imagine one not finding something to his liking. Of course, that doesn't mean it will be the perfect camera, just good enough.

If the X-Pro was suitable for sports photography I would be tempted to buy it. This means ultra fast AF, a 70-200 zoom and high fps. It is not so I'll happily use my D300 until it dies.

I do love my X10 which is almost perfect: not as small as my Leica D-Lux 4 but better in other aspects; so it's more than good enough for me.

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Now I see there's no diopter adjustment on this thing? Stupid!

But you have the ability to have either a standard screw on adjustment lens or a custom screw on lens or a heap of screw on lens accessories. Fuji have made it quite plain right from the start that there was no diopter adjustment and have explained the reason why.

The X-Pro1 and any camera in that style is never in it's widest dreams going to be suitable for action sports photography but where it will probably shine is to COMPLIMENT a DSLR system for team and player candids on the sideline.

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Is the screw on standard or "Fuji standard"? Considering the high cost of this body, I expect to have this convenience.

Who knows...the third iteration of this model may come close to being ideal for sports. Now, I don't mean best for sports - as in AF tracking players - but good enough.

As for a complimentary DSLR system, nope. I'm not about to carry multiple lenses just to use this body, would rather just buy another DSLR. I would thnk my X10 is better suited for that purpose.

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Is the screw on standard or "Fuji standard"? Considering the high cost of this body, I expect to have this convenience.

I think that you will find that it's like the thread on the shutter release and that any old lens hoods or magnifiers or right angle viewers or whatever that you have left over from the film days will work perfectly. The Fuji video made a point of saying that you would be able to use accessory shades and the like.

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So the big question, is - will Fuji bring out a FULL-FRAME version of the X-Pro1?

b/c if they do, it would make all these APS-C image circle lenses completely redundant

if they're not and completely believe that optimising the APS-C on future developments is the way to go, ie. more DR, more resolution etc.. then it would convince a lot of people on the fence

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So the big question, is - will Fuji bring out a FULL-FRAME version of the X-Pro1?

I don't think so, as the image quality IS already on full-frame level quality wise. It'll be cool to get more adapter rings for M42 or likewise.

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why hasn't Fuji made a statement on this?

people just want to know fuji will not abandon or upgrade the line and make their investments go down the pipe

the other consideration is DOF isolation/control, much more on a FF. eg. a 35mm f1.4 APS-C lens is equivalent to a 53mm f2.1 lens on FF

if they do offer a full-frame or larger sensor camera it will more than likely be a different line. say, a medium format equivalent resolution in a small package..

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So the big question, is - will Fuji bring out a FULL-FRAME version of the X-Pro1?

Im gonna go with NO. but as an addendum .. stop stressing FFS.

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i know this is a rhetorical question about Fujifilm going full frame.

I will think NO because Fujifilm has lead the pack in the APS-C sensor and from that perspective, it is leading the pack in the beginner to serious amateur to even semi-professional market (that's me). So for them to go FF when Nikon and Canon is leading ain't going be doing anything positive for them unless they have a Full Frame sensor that can lead both of them and that itself would take lots of time and company resources.

FJF is picking the right fight because Canon and Nikon has basically abandoned the serious APS-C users (that's me) and have seen the pent up frustration with the lack of D300/300s upgrade and the not so there D7000 (which Nikon management may think it is a worthy upgrade to the D300s which is not unfortunately). As for Canon they have the 7D but is worse off than the 40D/60D in some ways hence their APS-C is under-served as well.

Plus the fact that the market is clamouring for APS-C quality in a MFT sized system, FJF is hitting the right notes at the moment.

And they should keep hitting the right notes until all the lens for the system is out. From zooms to 24mm primes (35mm equivalent) and other lens that will at least cover the range of shooting possibilities. It would be in their interests too if FJF can get 3rd party lens makers such as Tokina (Panasonic owned), Sigma and Tamron to support. The market is also responding with adaptors which is a good thing.

Hence I hope FJF concentrate on getting the X Mount running good before going FF. Nikon and Canon don't have much time left.

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Hence I hope FJF concentrate on getting the X Mount running good before going FF. Nikon and Canon don't have much time left.

I don't think "before FF" is on FJF agenda. There is no FF in FJF future so far as I can see. THey like APS-C as their "pro" sensor and are sticking their flag to that mast.

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Interesting debate.. I regularly use an old Nikon 50mm 1.2 on my D300, and other old glass. I struggle to get this pin sharp sometimes and so I bracket focus alot. I have been amazed at the autofocus on the X-Pro 1. Sooo sharp even wide open - I have complete faith in it. Ok, so its not infallible but what is? As to whether or not these lenses will be redundant in ? years, who knows? Shoot what you can with what you have now..

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