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  1. @Christopher You probably don't get the thanks and recognition for the effort that maintaining this forum probably takes. One has to accept that the community of Fuji users is a relatively small one, and this forum is a small subset of those people. I enjoy this forum as the discussions are civilised and interesting, even though I only own an X100 (original) now and in all honesty rarely use it, in favour of more modern (therefore "sexy") cameras. I think most of us who are "regulars" here appreciate the forum and enjoy it - I don't know how to make galleries and photos more popular, and when I have shown some of work here historically, it often gets little attention. Please keep up the good work, and sorry to be a never ending thorn in your side!
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  2. Why do people refer to "other" Fuji forums as "other" Fuji forums rather than naming names? The active membership here is so low that firstly I am sure most of the active members belong to other photo sites anyway and is naming names really going to cause a mass exodus or something? I belong to another Fuji forum (http://www.fujix-forum.com/) which I find to be much more alive and interesting than this one. There are decent discussions great photography on display and sensible behaviour but I keep coming back here because this was the first Fuji specific forum I joined and even if its only in a small way I want to support Christopher in his efforts and I continue to hope that this place will again become the dynamic and interesting place it once was.
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  3. My intention was to push those photos and discussions into our actual photo gallery: http://www.fujixseries.com/gallery/, but your feedback raises good points about the forum itself. Perhaps there needs to be more prominence on sharing photos outside of our gallery, since many photos are already hosted elsewhere. Back in 2012 the Fujifilm X Series was only just beginning to form, our budding forum was a unique resource for early adopters. As the Fujifilm X Series cameras have gained popularity in the past few years, many larger established camera websites, forums, and blogs have come online to also cover the subject, and our prominence on the web has become diluted. I'm not ready to give up on this community though, and I hope you won't give us on us either. Your feedback is helpful, and I'm open to further suggestions.
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  4. I think both the pictures in this thread bear out what Artuk and I were saying about wide angle use. The wider angle the lens is the more need for a foreground object. In this case it can only be a hay bale - perhaps even just the edge of one but close enough to the camera to see detail with the main vista and further hay bales spreading out behind and giving a greater sense of depth and scale to the image. If you can't get up close to something then get down low and show some detail in the ground - or hay stubble. Hope you don't mind Rob. Too good a sky to miss out on. (Nik col FX) - Tonal contrast filter @ default and standard setting then a Silver FX layer - a slight increase of blacks and whites and 28% sepia tone this (SFX) layer's opacity then reduced to 70%. Quick and dirty. Vic
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  5. I'm looking forward to the release of the MacOS version of Irridient X-Transformer, I think it will be out later this month. I think it's a brilliant solution for Adobe Lightroom users that don't want to switch to a new RAW processor or editing workflow, but who also find Adobe's X-Trans RAW rendering to be less than ideal. With Irridient's new X-Trans to DNG convertor, one can simply convert the Fujifilm RAW files to Adobe DNG, but without losing the fine details that Adobe's own RAW rendering would, then import those into Lightroom for super fast 'bayer sensor style' post processing. The best of both worlds!
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  7. As most of us already know, the Fuji image files look awesome. To be fair, image files from any camera these days will look really good, but there's something really special about the way the Fujifilm X Series cameras portray color and tone. While the Fuji image processors play a part in this, much of the Fuji mojo is due to the X-Trans sensor. With its proprietary non-Bayer pattern design, the X-Trans sensor reproduces color in a unique way that's different from the way it's done in just about every other digital camera. In my search to figure out what's really going on here, it occurred to me, (and was verified by a few of the Fuji reps and engineers), that the X-Trans sensor is actually very "film-like." It's much more so than most other sensors, and this is no accident. In designing the X-Trans sensor, the Fuji engineers looked back as much as they looked forward. Trying to preserve the heritage and legacy of traditional photography, they designed the "random" array on the X-Tran sensor so that it resembles the randomness of film. As we know, film was essentially silver halide glitter that was poured into a bowl of jelly and smeared onto a plastic base. There was nothing "regular" about the way grain looked in film, and although the X-Trans sensor isn't totally random, it does closely match the look of actual film grain, especially when it comes to the distribution of the green sensitive pixels. Compare that with an actually cross section of Autochrome Lumiere film from the early 1900s. It's amazing how close the pattern looks to the X-Trans sensor pattern. Also, compare the two image below, one is a scan from a Velvia slide, and the other is JPEG file from the X-T2. You can see an expanded version of this topic on my blog, along with more image examples. I've even got a side by side comparison of the grain in ACROS next to the old T-MAX 3200 film. I'm fascinated by this idea, let me know your thoughts! Below: An enlargement of the grain on an original Fujifilm Velvia slide film image. Below: An enlargement of an X-T2 JPEG file.
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  8. @scharfsj I was the person who commented on your race photos. I think I had just returned from my holiday at the time and missed your original post but picked it up when you commented on the lack of comments. Or maybe it was because I had just passed through Sonoma and noticed the thread title. As a non professional photographer, I sometimes feel intimidated making anything more than a comment on how a photograph looks or makes me feel. Being honest, I felt you posted too many similar shots for a generalist (i.e. non-racing) website. I would have preferred to see and comment on your three or four favourites. Or to see reasons why you thought each one was worth including in the thread. In my Bodie thread, which I see you read and commented on, thanks, I just shared a couple of my favourite shots and provided a link to a gallery of the rest. I think people get daunted by a huge set of shots. I didn't really comment on your photos, for the reason I gave above. I can't really give technical feedback to a pro. But I called out the picture I liked most, the one of Ryan Hunter-Reay. i liked it because the car was leaning heavily into the corner and really looked like it was moving fast, and there was space on the left of the shot for it to move into. It really gave me the best sense of speed and movement of all the cornering shots you shared. If I'm honest, most of the other shots could have been of stationary cars and they would not have looked much different. The tight cropping was maybe a reason for that, and maybe you did that to show how good the focus was. The shot directly above Ryan Hunter-Reay, a classic side on shot showing motion blur, was my second favourite, as again it gave me a sense of speed and engagement with the photo, but the shot was still too tightly cropped for me, it needed space around it to give it a sense of movement, which is why the other was my favourite overall. Not being a connoisseur of racing, it maybe that your shots fall into a style that is expected in that sport, and therefore I may be missing something about the framing and emotion. Or it may be that, as you say, your choice of shot was based on giving a clear idea of the capability of the X-T2 - something of little interest to me. Technically, they were all great shots. I have nothing to add on that. On the subject of this thread, I have a couple of points to make... 1. I really like this forum, it is civilised, has respectful and helpful members and is not pushing kit at you all the time. 2. Having said that, like you, I really would like there to be a lively area where we can share our favourite images for frank and honest discussion. I thrive on constructive criticism and would really appreciate it from some of the members here. I think Flickr is too fast moving and dominated by a few vocal and sometimes unpleasant cliques. I have been an infrequent visitor for a few months due to being busy starting a new job, spending time on my electronic music hobby and, <shocker> having settled on a camera body and set of lenses I am really happy with. I would be here a lot more often if we had more discussion on photos. Maybe a shot clinic thread/forum?
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  9. Likewise. I don't need leadership to do what I've done fairly regularly from the start. In fact it's mainly down to me, Marco, Artuk and about 3 others to comment. However, just like Artuk I've met with hostility too. Not always - @johnwillyums posted pictures and I suggested how they might be improved and he took it in the way it was intended but others want only "nice" replies and no negatives. I don't know about you but if I'm going to contribute any more than "nice" or "I like it", then I'm going to be honest but hopefully kind too. Then again How long am I to spend giving my honest critique with only a half dozen others to share the burden. Sometimes I don't have time to comment more than "nice" and I'd prefer to not comment at all than do that to images and members who deserve better. My wife already tells me I spend too long on the PC. Many of the images posted in the gallery are posted by first time members who contribute nothing prior nor after posting apart from more images. Those - and they make up a fair proportion of gallery posts - don't even get a like from me. If many pictures are posted by a member then again it's hard to comment on all and usually I will comment on one and mention the others. Perhaps we should have a limit of 3 image uploads a day per member but even that can be awkward if the member has a special sequence of 6 to post - maybe allow that on the forums but not for comment.
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  10. Phone them. Fuji UK (even just after Xmas and new year and in the midst of train/tube strikes) are generally reckoned to give the best service. BTW. You can get new clothes for your XT1 on ebay/amazon etc.
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  11. @christopher I tend to mark things for deletion during the process of selecting for post processing. Then once I'm happy with the photos I've edited and exported, its easier to delete the rubbish as its already marked. FWIW I use a regime of: - delete mark = technical failure or obvious rubbish - 1* = poor photo similar to delete mark when examined later - 2* = duplicate of other(s) I will work.on - 3* = average - 4* or 5* = to be worked on So generally delete marks go straight away and 1-3* go qt the end of the editing process.
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  12. National Geographic today is not the Nat Geo we all fondly remember from our childhoods. To start with its owned by Rupert Murdoch the enemy of serious and unbiased journalism.
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  13. I'd go as far to say most competitions fall into that category. Competitions today seem to exist for two reasons 1. The organisers rack in a huge profit from the entry fees and 2. To get access to images that the organisers can if they wish to monetise at the expense of the suckers who pay to submit them.
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  14. As a (somewhat) newer user of this forum, I have a couple of thoughts, if you can spare the neurons. scharfsj, you make a good point, and personally I have viewed many of the pics that are posted here. I don't comment on them, or 'like' them, but I enjoy seeing people's perspectives. Perhaps I could be more proactive in this regard. On a parallel note, the fact is that I didn't join this forum to look at pics from a Fuji X camera, I joined it because I had questions about a number of different things regarding Fuji cameras and processing in general. Also, being an amateur, I have made some ignorant statements and individuals here have been patient in their feedback and responses. I haven't found another Fuji forum in my travels that is consistently as easy going.
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  15. Hi Chris. I took two bodies as anyone who understands backup would do. And it was going to afford me the luxury of having two lenses mounted thus saving precious time swapping. Of course I ended up swapping but it all worked out. The story.... Upon the first days arrival, a bear of a traveling day, with the grueling experience at the visa, immigration and security clusterf*cks at the airport, we stopped at a nice viewpoint for sunset on the way to our hotel. I made exactly FOUR frames on one of my XPro2's and upon changing the ISO setting, the camera became unresponsive. Couldn't get it to come up alive. I wasn't going to waste another minute while the light was good so I swapped bodies and continued on. Back in my room I took the faulty body out of my bag and noticed how warm it was, especially around the battery compartment. I tried everything I could to reset it or get it going again, and although I saw a small flicker of glow on the rear screen, it refused to cooperate. I did not use that battery again since perhaps it was a problem. I had 5 others. I made about 6300 frames on my working body and the trip was a success. I sent the faulty unit in to Fuji last week and am still waiting to hear back about repair estimate or warranty status. Either way, I'm really curious to know what the problem was, and if they tell me, I'll let you know. Meanwhile, here's one from the roof of my hotel at sunrise.
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  16. OK, Just to be clear. On a Mac a RAW RAF file from the XT-2 will not display the image, while a jpeg will display. This is an Apple OS issue nothing to do with Lightroom. My Macbook (Finder) will display a jpeg but not an RAF file from my XT-2. Lightroom CC currently updated to the latest version handles all RAW or jpeg files as it should.
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  17. Artuk, you need to take a break from looking at all the images you do and reading about countries with horrible politics. Some of the world has always been like that and is not about to change. Personally I choose to photograph beautiful landscapes, nature, and various interesting cultures. I want to enjoy my image making. It help me cope with the rest of the hate in the world. When I need to update my worldly views, I get enough of that crap on TV, reading or the Internet. And, thank you for your comments on my photographs.
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  18. Hi @Bárbara, thank you for the step-by-step walk-through. I've owned an X-30 for a little over a year now, and it's only today that I realized I needed the flash . . . and it's not working. No matter what I pressed/ toggled, nothing seemed to work. I was this "close" to hitting "Reset" when I stumbled into this site. The flash is working now! Happy New Year!
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  19. What you say may apply if one's pictures are taken for publication but even so - there is precious little that has not been photographed especially since the advent of digital. However, pictures taken for oneself - hopefully with some artistic and technical merit are a different matter. The actual subject or victim chosen and the timing of the shot is a personal view. I'd love the chance to photograph those monks although even though I'd feel I was probably the millionth to do so. A photographer does not visit these countries then avoid taking pictures because others have. Everything has been photographed before and as you say, you "occasionally photograph Buddhist monks, but try to do so in a way that is personal, offering some personality or something artistic or unusual." It sounds a little pompous to assume that others are not. They may not be as good as it but they have just as much right to try. Personally I prefer to take, and to view candid portraits whatever they are taken with. Everything in photography is a cliche - does this mean I should go on safari and not take pictures because I can see animals in other peoples pictures or on TV - in fact with such great wildlife TV programs, why go at all?
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  20. Cliches are only significant to some people. I'd like to see those monks.
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  21. Severe testing in the Arctic. https://fujifilm-blog.com/2016/10/07/extreme-field-test-of-the-fujifilm-x-pro2-and-x-t2/?utm_campaign=7863094_Fujifilm X - The Digest 23-12-16&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Fujifilm Electronic Imaging Europe GmbH&dm_i=1Y2T,4OJ7A,G1XZFO,HHMKL,1
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  22. @Dismason I looked at your gallery, those are great hockey photos!! And I agree, the Fuji 35mm is one of my favorite lenses too. Keep up the good work!
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  23. Fuji X-Pro 1 - Samyang 12mm f2
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  24. I've been trying to stick to my primes and haven't really had a chance to take more than just a few shots with my new 16-55 f/2.8. I lament how large and heavy it is compared to all the others, so it really makes me reconsider carrying it. I'm past my return period, but I think it will be a necessary evil for certain events.
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  25. Thanks Christopher and DanBailey for your comments! At https://dismason.org/2016/12/19/shooting-hockey-39/ you can find new sport pics. This time shooting with Fujifilm X-T1 thru dirty glass at the hockey rink. One of my favorite lenses for sports is Fujinon XF 35mm.
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  28. The new NP-126S batteries for the X-T2 are pretty much identical as the old ones, with one exception- they've been designed to dissipate heat a little better for shooting 4K video. When I got my X-T2, I just threw the battery in the drawer with all of my other NP-126 batteries, and use it interchangeably without much thought. If you're shooting lots of 4K video, you'd definitely want the new NP-126S, but if not, you'll probably have fine results with good generic batteries. I use older NP-126 batteries in my X-T2 all the time with no problem or loss of performance.
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  29. Hi! I bought a Fuji X30 a few days ago and was facing this issue with the flash too, so I'm going to tell you what I did to make my camera's flash fire. First, I realised that it was in silent mode, like all of you said. Second, that the Selector button, whenever I pressed to select Flash, Macro, etc, was always selecting the focus area instead of the flash or other settings. So here goes what do you need to do, step by step: first, turn on the camera, then click on the "Menu/OK" button -> scroll down until you get on the Set-up (blue menu) number 1, press Menu/OK -> choose Silent Mode and turn it "off" -> then, go back to the blue menu and select the number 2 (or just scroll the screen down till you get on the SELECTOR BUTTON SETTING) -> change the selection from "Focus Area" to "Fn BUTTON". Done! Now you'll be able to use your flash, or the macro mode, etc, by clicking on the 4 buttons around the Menu button. Just pop up the flash and be happy for finally being able to select what you really wanna use on the Selector Buttons. You'll be able to choose if you want the flash on or off and other choices. Sorry if my English is not correct, but I hope I could help another customers like me that just couldn't understand why the flash wasn't working properly.
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  30. Really gloomy weather here in UK lately so I only managed to shoot wild birds in garden. This (we have great flocks of wild ring necked green parakeets in Southern England) was shot through double glazing with XT1 + Canon FD 300mm L lens + x1.4 TC mounted on a monopod. Distance 10m, aperture on lens f4 @ just 1/220, ISO 1600.(Total equivalent 630mm @ f5.6). I used a technique passed on to me by an M4/3 manual lens shooter, of employing CL grabbing focus (Mag peaking) as near as possible then shooting off 4 or 5 frames. Hit rate was 3 out of 5 with 1 or 2 out of 5 expected for BiFs after practice, which is far better than I ever thought I would get with a manual focus lens. Hopefully we will soon get some brighter, if colder and snowy weather from this weekend to make it worth while going further abroad now I know I can shoot with a monopod. My mentor shoots 400-500mm on M4/3 with the same technique - often handheld! The lens is very sharp even with X1.4 TC. I have a 2X TC on it's way but I'm not expecting such good results with that fitted. Unfortunately I don't think Canon made an FD TC of X1.7 which would give me an extra half stop of light still with good reach. Uncropped image - click full size then + for whole image. Second picture added today of a Long tailed tit. The weather hasn't brightened today, in fact both of these were at least 2 stops under-exposed and needed some heavy recovery with the necessary NR in pp. The first picture taken through double glazing while for today's I moved just outside but had to contend with a strong breeze blowing the feeder. I remembered to input the correct FL today of 300mm + 1.4X TC = 420mm. Aperture set on lens, f4 @1/1000, ISO 1600.
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  31. @scharfsj We were obviously thinking about different people. I take your word that you found discussions were from debate to personal - a pity as there is no need for it even when people disagree strongly. @K1W1_Mk2 I actually refer to the "other" Fuji forum as I can't accurate remember it's name / URL (I haven't used it in a long time) and am aware that Fuji Rumors started a forum with a near identical name - so its easier than bothering to look up the name or URL or get nit-picking over any name used.
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  32. I do find the 10-24 useful, though not that often. Street photography sometimes. But where I do use it more frequently is on an infra-red converted X-E1. Being able to include lots of interesting sky in IR works well for me. I, too, like Vic's conversion of your hay bales image Rob. Chris
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  33. Thanks for your reply, Christopher. From a "kaizen" perspective, a philosophy I am sure you understand and support, there is always room for continuous improvement. I think it's appropriate to have a more dedicated sections on different genres, but that's up to you to decide. I agree that Fuji X Series was one of the first Fuji forums back in the 2012 time-frame, which is why I joined, but to be honest, in addition to a community that doesn't seem to me to be particularly "engaged" in dialog with fellow members, a lot of the reason I "left" for the better part of 4 years is I got tired of the continual aggressive sniping/snarky/confrontational replies by small but very consistent set of members here. For example, back in 2012, an extremely talented professional photographer that use to post here told me they felt they were literally "driven away" from here, and which actually extended to hostile behavior outside of this forum. This was someone who was vastly more talented, capable, experienced and knowledgeable than the vast majority of people here. After hanging out here a bit longer, I basically left as well and for the same reasons, essentially. I find "the Original Fuji X Forum" to be considerably friendlier, to be honest with you. A community is both what people make of it, and what people let others make of it. Best regards, Stephen
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  34. May I suggest that 16bit tiff files is probably un-necessary? For single session edits where you are not saving and reopening and re-editing the same file many times, a 100% quality jpeg or better a jpeg2000 with high bit depth colour should suffice - I often do a single session edit as the final stage after raw development on jpegs and don't feel I lose anything compared to working with tiffs (which just eat up storage and memory). Maybe try and it and see if you can see th difference. It may depend what you are editing - I rarely adjust colour etc, as that's better done in raw, but for example cloning or sharpening etc then jpegs should be fine.
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  36. It may take some time before Apple updates their OS level RAW rendering to support the X-T2 so file thumbnails are generated in Finder. Much like how Adobe is sometimes a few weeks behind in supporting the very latest RAW files from new cameras, Apple faces the same issue. These days Apple's RAW support updates are rolled into general Mac OS updates, so perhaps 10.12.3 will bring support.
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  37. Have you checked whether the camera is set to 'silent mode'? This will disable the flash.
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  38. Chris, it was my first trip there. I was with a group of photographers but I had a lot of free time to roam and wander. We mainly visited Havana and Trinidad, with a small town between where we visited a grade school. Yes, Artuk, I am painfully aware of all you say. I went to experience the country as it is and not get too hung up on the social-political aspects which are pretty apparent. There is a small rise in tourism happening but plenty of the real thing left to explore and photograph. I brought school supplies and snack foods to give to the children and teachers at the schools I had a chance to visit and photograph within. I went with a person who has been visiting Cuba for over twenty years and knows many people that gave us access to places and activities that were quite special. Regardless of the economic and political situation for most people, they were happy, loving, extremely friendly and we became friends as I photographed away. Their lives had character and charm and I was privileged to have them share that with me.
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  39. johnwillyums, I just bought Affinity about 4 days ago. I bought it because it was so cheap, about what I spend at a local takeout place. I am still playing around with it, its editing module (they have something called personas, akin to a module) is quite well featured. Its RAW, I still am not sure how good it is. For example, compared to Irident it seems to be not as crisp. I used the ON1 RAW, and it is comparable to Affinity. But I find the ON1 Editing features to be a bit ham handed, small tweaks can send the picture being over tweaked?. I would like to compare it to others as well. The reason I am still looking is not because I am not satisfied with Affinity. I figured that if I am going through the trouble of using RAW, which apparently can potentially be tweaked to better output than jpg, I should get a converter that gives the best results. Otherwise why go with a workflow that only achieves similar results to jpg? So, ON1 has a 30 day trial license, Affinity didn't seem to have anything like it, Irident can also be previewed without a license (saving results in a watermark), Silkypix also has a trial (though I felt the UI was a bit dated), Capture One is a bit out of my price range, and LR's licensing is not my cup of tea. Also, ON1 doesn't currently support Fuji's lossless compression RAW files. So that is where I am in my travels. Hope this helps in some way.
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  40. You will find that the better grip is more useful than the ability to connect to a tripod or monopod.
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  41. artuk, Thanks, capture One looks interesting. I did download a trial of Silkypix, it reminded me of software from the 90s. I think Fuji uses a version of that in its free converter, if i'm not mistaken.
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  42. Has the C setting on the Exposure Comp dial so I guess its up to +/-5 via a command wheel like the X-T2
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  43. Here is pro focus mode in a studio setting. Pro focus mode does well with simple backgrounds.
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  44. Christopher, this is a nice idea for a monochromatic image that can be improved. Obviously the leaf was somewhat curled and so some parts of it toward the edges are visibly out of focus.Two possible remedies are as follows. If the leaf is fallen, one can place it flat on a window by holding it with some tape (of course, with the latter out of the framed composition). If the leaf is on a tree, things are getting much harder as one has also to fight possible wind gust, odd placement of the tripod, ... you name it. Anyway, assuming these are manageable, one could use photo stacking to get all portions of the leaf in focus. Photo stacking can also be used with the leaf on a window if this still has some curliness and one wants to avoid a too small aperture (to increase the DOF) where diffraction can kick in. I really like the bright tonality of this leaf and I hope the suggestions above can help you to enhance the outcome.
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  45. Check out this article @johnwillyums, they talk about all sorts of alternative lens hood options for Fujifilm lenses: http://fujixtras.blogspot.com/2015/08/all-about-that-hood.html For the 16mm they recommend this $5 USD metal hood on eBay: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Metal-Wide-Lens-Hood-for-67mm-Filter-Thread-Canon-Nikon-Sony-Pentax-MH-67W-/282295281007
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  46. Thanks for you input guys, you've pretty much confirmed, what I thought would be the case. I was hoping to get the 90mm for a christmas present for myself, but I don't think I'll have enough. So maybe I'll just get some accessories instead, this and a grip :-)
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  47. Hello, The X70 is one of my most used cameras, and I really appreciate the USB charging feature. It uses a micro USB connection at the camera, and I have charged it from the USB port on my macbook and from the USB ports on a special charging outlet that we installed in our kitchen. When on the go, I have charged it from an Anker brand USB adapter in my car, and from my Voltaic Systems solar panels and back up battery with a USB port when out in the woods or camping. In fact, I have yet to use the Fuji charger that came with it . I hope this helps. D Lafon
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  48. Hello Mark :-) I shoot entirely in RAW format and Black and White conversion is carried out in L/R or P/S or should I say CC? Good luck with your choice of Fuji cameras; the Fuji lenses are of stunning quality in terms of image quality and detail capture. Regards, Peter. In the UK we dare not take pictures of children as rightly or wrongly we seem to be in many ways a paranoid society however in most countries abroad there is no such paranoia; some people are proud for you to photograph their children, these two taken on Majuli island within the massive Brahmaputra river, Assam, NE India.
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  49. Welcome to the community @Dismason The X-T2 is really winning over a lot of professional photographers, these are exciting times!
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