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  1. Also a few form XT2 and X70 but mainly two XP2s. All 4000 + frames from a Documentary style wedding shoot in a video lasting a just few minutes. By Kevin Mullins http://f16.click/wedding-photography/every-frame-wedding-x-pro2.html
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  3. Two cameras, worth its price!
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  4. VJC, He looks like someone bathed him with Rogaine (or some other hair growing gel). j/k
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  5. Yes, that version of LR is correct for XT2 files. I very much recommend you try then Iridient for Windows - Iridient X Transformer. You can use it from within LR but it will export a tiff file into LR. I use IXT as a standalone either opening direct from its own file menu or from my image browser (FastStone) under the Edit with menu. Either way it will convert the raw to DNG (retaing the raw) and do the conversion automatically according to your settings. Below are my IXT settings. Note the LR import NR and sharpen is off. I do my NR and sharpen with nik Define and output sharpen. Once IXT has done its magic I pen the DNGs in LR. Iridient seems to have the conversion algorithm right and by avoiding LR sharpen too there is no trace of mushiness in distant foliage. Iridient has a free trial and is anyway very cheap. Vic
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  6. John, what happened to you looks really puzzling. If it were some sort of spill, I would be surprised it would have very uniformly covered the front element and if it did so then I would be afraid some of it could have been adsorbed at the edge of the front element and entered the lens. I am rather wondering if by any chance you have taken the lens in a environment with mist/thick vapors that have coated the front element and, once dried, left a thin film on it. Either way, it looks like you have removed it without damage. So, my two cents of advice is that if the lens works fine and gives you beautiful pictures, then do not worry about this until you need to have it serviced by Fuji for some other reasons. In that occasion you can mention to them this accident and ask them to check, and if necessary replace, the front element.
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  7. http://www.fujifilm.com/news/n170222_02.html 80mm f2.8 macro should be soon. Best news is what looks like 300mm (hopefully f4 OIs prime + new 1.4X/2.0X TCs which are mooted to work with other Fuji lenses (2018). Two new video X lenses (not the newly announced Sony fit lenses of similar FLs).
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  8. An update for everyone. I know it's been a while, but I only finalised this issue today. To give you a quick run down... I had focussing problems with my 16-55mm. The camera store I purchased it from sent it back to Fuji in Oct/Nov. It came back with them saying there was nothing wrong with the lens despite the hundreds of soft photos. I sent it back again on Jan 6th again with raw files so they could see there was definitely something wrong with it. It got sent off with my XT2 as well. My gear has been with Fuji ever since, and just now I've found out the lens has actually been replaced under warranty, and is now ready to be collected with my camera body. So it looks like they got it wrong the first time, and it's now taken them 6 weeks to find the issue. I still don't know what the problem wass exactly, (I'll see if I can get more info when I collect everything), but yeah, obviously it was the lens and not me or the focussing modes I was using! Grrrr... happy to be receiving a new lens though! I'll definitely give it a good test run this weekend with 2 weddings
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  9. Wow! That was an awesome motion picture (literally) of a wedding - beginning to end. Not entirely convinced however that the camera is to be thanked as much as the talent of the photographer. It takes real world experience to shoot like that and the talent is definitely there. Great job!
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  10. Hi Daniel your quote is just simply wrong no offence meant but see here Fujifilm WP-126 battery vs. WP-126S fully explained. Why NOT to use the XT1 battery in XT2 I hope this helps some that is my intention Have a nice day Also please not if you charge the generic x-t1 batteries in the grip then they will over heat I know this for a fact so don't leave the grip on the camera and charging NP-W126 - batteries IT becomes a fire hasard Tom G
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  11. Thanks for the feedback John. From what I've read you are not alone in losing the eyepiece so lets hope they have made it a more permanent fixture on your camera now. Best, Vic
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  12. John, thank you for the update and the sharing of your thought. The good news is that you have your camera back in your hands and, while waiting for the caps to arrive, you can start using it again. Just be careful not to expose the open sync terminal to water or dirt.
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  13. Hello Christopher, and veejaycee I just thought I'd give you some feedback, regarding Fuji UK, and my return. As you know, I lost my PCSynch Cap, whilst attaching a generic grip, plus L bracket. A few days later, I noticed, that the rubber eyepiece, had also gone missing. As you know, whilst this an unacknowledged fault/quality control problem it is accepted for a free repair, in the UK So, I sent it off, in the free Fuji packaging provided, and received it back, in 4 working days(Thursday, until Tuesday), so I think Fuji UK is first rate, in that respect, Though I can't tell, they have apparently replaced the whole eyepiece unit. The reason they do not ship out parts, to self fit, is because, the eyepiece rubber, "is like a jigsaw", and easy to fit wrongly, put glue in wrong place etc. Fair enough, unfortunately, they forgot to replace the PC Synch Cover, so I had to phone Fuji back, once again. Luckily, I spoke to the same guy, as I had originally spoken to, and he remembered me, and was sympathetic, etc, However, it is apparent that , either this is indeed extremely rare, or they just don't have spares of the PC Synch Cover, so after a slight attempt, at suggesting gaffer tape, He agreed to send me "at least a couple of spares of the cap", which "just pushes in", but might take him some time to get hold of. Well. He said they will come eventually :-) This got me thinking, the lost eyepiece, could be a quality control problem, hence rare, hence maybe easier to obtain the whole unit, for replacement, than just the rubber. It also seems likely, that it could be a problem if you self repair incorrectly. So maybe the cap is a similar problem, or at least very rare, or perhaps he is going to obtain them, from un-fixable cameras, that are just scrap, or, he might have to get them from Fuji Japan. Do not know. That's speculation, it also occurs to me that this is good info, for anyone who this happens to, so should be remembered for the future. In case it happens to one of our members. I got accused of being an idiot, lying, being simple minded, and making all this up, on an FB Fuji page I use occasionally! Cheers folks, John Williams
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  15. Dismason

    The Icy Bike Track

    I was sitting on a rock in the woods when two men stopped and asked me what I'm doing. - "I'm waiting for bicycle riders to shoot them," I replied. - "What shall you do with the photographs?" asked one of them. - "I have plans to send one photo to National Geographic." - "Oh Boy!!! National Geographic!!! How many times do you want us to drive by?" - "Three times please :-) "
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  16. Very crisp (photo), matching the season. Thanks for the story too.
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  17. Ostravaczech, thank you for sharing another beautiful cactus portrait. This is very nice indeed. The needles in the center are crisp and sharp while the out-of-focus ones in the background create a symmetric feathery effect that I particularly like. The contrast between the green and pink colors is also captivating. The only thing I would change is slightly cropping the right side of the image to remove the otherwise distracting out-of-focus elements in the background and to make the image more square which I think would further emphasize and fit such a symmetric subject.
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  19. Thanks for your response. Seems some of the reviewers who've had early access have looked into this already and yes, the TCL does work with the digital teleconverter, yielding focal lengths equivalent to about 110mm. I'm going to be interested to find out what a 16MP crop looks like out of such a file. If it's good then you're getting some serious 'telephoto' action from such a small camera! Oh, here's the link to the review: http://macfilos.com/photo/2017/2/5/fuji-x100f-first-impressions-on-the-streets-of-london
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  20. Yes its a great shame that the camera and primes are completely unstabilised - only m43rds and Sony offer that. you are confusing iso and exposure. The cameras meter correctly for the actual iso used, but exaggerate the iso values quite a bit. Olympus do this too by about 1ev. If your files are dark that's more likely to be the exposure program not reading the scene ideally - I often found files a little dark by maybe 1/3ev but also often had problems with bad clipping which needed significant -ve compensation. I think Olympus files look good at ISO 6400 because their jpeg engine is good - a m43rds sensor made by Sony uses the same technology as all their other sensors, but has half the surface area of apsc and a quarter of full frame. Unsurprisingly, noise performance drops by at least 1 stop as you halve sensor size, at the same magnification. Pixel density also plays a part, and its interesting to compare 20mp 1" sensors with 20mp 43rds sensors with 42mp full frame - there is no mafic bullet to get around small sensel (pixel) size and noise management issues.
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  22. TCs are a compromise so it makes sense to get a matched one rather than generic. I recently purchased a Canon FD 300mm f4L lens only after I'd sourced a matching Canon FD 1.4XA TC made for that lens.
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  23. The 1.4X converter can only be used with the 50-140mm and the 100-400mm. Due to lens/converter design the rear elements of other lenses would collide with the front element of the converter..
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  24. Keep your eyes out for Fujifilm cash back on the lens. got £250 back on mine so was happy with that.
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  25. A 16-65 f4 or better still 16-80 f4 OIS would be the answer to many Fuji users prayers, inc mine. They should be able to make it high quality and it should be a great single lens/body walkabout set up. Also 300mm or 400mm f4 OIS primes to work with a TC.
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  27. On a recent four day bushwalk in the SE of Tasmania, this was visited on the final day of the Three Capes Track. In the lower left is the Candle Stick which some people paddle out to using sea kayaks and then climb up. The ultimate challenge.
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  28. I'm not aware of any changes in production or a revised design. OIS would be nice, but with even the original primes still being made, a revised design seems a long ways away. It has become my least used and least inspiring lens. It's 'fine' I guess but I hope I never actually need it
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  29. I agree with Dan, it seems that is most likely the reason for the heat dissipation feature. Currently I'm using some DOT-01 brand batteries that I got through Amazon, and they've been fine so far, but I'm mostly shooting casual stuff and always have a real battery as a backup. Haven't noticed any strange behavior beyond sudden drain in cold weather, which could happen with any battery. If they start swelling, then I'd be nervous, that's my only fear with any of these... I guess paying attention to how easily they fit into the compartment is a good way to keep track of that, if it happens like with old Wasabi batteries as the horror stories out there seem to indicate.
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  30. You'll get all sorts of advice on what to take - mostly from people who have never been on safari. South Africa private reserve safaris are to my way of thinking often (not always) more like a large open zoo with fences where something like the 55-200 will suffice for many animals because the owners/guides know almost every animal and where it will be at any given time and these can often be approached closely but even here we are talking more of the large animals from Elephant to Cheetah in size. Personally speaking, if that's all I had to photograph I'd be bored. The more modern SA reserve will agree open borders with their neighbours as far as the animals are concerned - better for the animals and no fences to maintain. The link above seemed to suggest the 400mm focal length as standard and on APS so would I. My safaris (1 Tsavo W, 2 Amboseli, 3 Tsavo E - Kenya) have been shot with Nikon DSLR FF and APS. The D300 was fitted with 50-500mm (non IS) and the D700 with 28-300 or 24-70 - the former because it had stabilisation - neither setup had WR but were kept out of dust when on the move - in a completely open vehicle that may not be possible and dust can be a problem so no swapping of lenses. You need to think what smaller animals you might want to photograph (many you won't have though of) and you might regret missing out on the birds/apes/monkeys/baboons in trees - they will need a longer lens. Should you be lucky enough to witness a hunt you will need a long lens. I was lucky to see a (failed) hunt which began when a lioness left her half grown cubs about 20 ft from our vehicle but ended 150 yds away even at 750mm equiv I had to crop a lot - perhaps consider hiring in SA, there are several stores that do this. You need two bodies. Elephants close up will fill the frame of the short zoom. Don't dismiss landscape shots - or more importantly animals in their environment - if you don't show this you might as well be in a zoo. If you allowed in the park after sunset (unusual) then a wide aperture may be worthwhile but otherwise there is plenty of light so the 55-200 will give you extra reach if you decide against the 100-400m. Err on the long side as main lens but have a second body with 16-55 f2.8 or 18-55 fitted. I use a beanbag rest from the roof of our landcruiser - one of those that screw into the tripod fitting so I could simply lift the assembly down into the vehicle one go. If your vehicle is open then a monopod is ldeal and you may even have some permanent fitting for your camera if the vehicle is owned by the reserve. Take an empty beanbag to be safe and fill it up when you get there. It makes no difference how much you gear weighs once you're in the vehicle. It may be worth contacting the safari/reserve by email to find what gear is best for their particular reserve. A few of my pictures here to show the variety of photograph you might take and therefore the lenses you might need. https://goo.gl/photos/ucCYC7PvUgfpNj3D6
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  31. I did compose a reply to this, but then it got lost... You are right about the "3D" effect and that's why some people use it in physique sports etc too as it adds that contrast to make things more defined. A agree its also something to use with care. Whatever specific software calls it - clarity, tone mapping, local contrast, detail etc - it all has broadly the same effect of analysing a picture and apply contrast to each local area to accentuate whatever was already there. In many ways its like HDR - overdone it is hideous, but used carefully it can help bring out what is already in a picture. I know landscape photographers like to use clarity and local tone mapping to being our definition and sharpness in scenery, for example. Unsharp mask with a larger radius but a low amount is another way of boosting detail and local contrast, as that's all sharpening is anyway - adding contrast! Some of the tone mapping processes do more complex things but which end up with the same type of result. It's not something I'd want to use on portraits in general - certainly not female portraits anyway as for those some softening using -ve clarity etc or a slight Gaussian blur may be preferred! - though it could work on those black and white craggy face type photos.
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  32. its generally very easy to spot when tone mapping uas been used as it gives the skin that strange textured look. I wish I could post a sample of how bad such photos look, but it would be inappropriate to post other peoples pictures here, but here's a link to social media https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/apassionese/ unfortunately many subjects like it as it makes them look "big", and the uninformed viewer may take it as photographic "truth". I've been asked if I can male my photos of someone loo that way, and my reply is always that its ugly, and I don't use "cheap filter effects" like the ones people use on Smartphone apps.
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  33. There is definitely a great deal of social pressure and body dysmorphia suffered by young men in Europe now, and increasingly in the developing world where media idolises a western lifestyle as "aspirational". I wish I knew make up artists who I could work with, partly to reduce the need for post production, partly to improve the "look", and partly because I know what a positive impact it can have on look and physique. The other common trend is the use of tone mapping and localised contrast to accentuate physique, muscle and vascularity. I try to avoid the "vein popping" look as I don't find it attractive and I dislike obvious extreme post processing - although such a look garners great interest in social media. I try to keep my photos grounded in a more "real" look, perhaps based on a "fine arts" sensibility instead of cheap processing effects. The social aesthetic pressure on young men is probably greater than for women now, since sensibilities have failed to keep up - just look at mainstream adverts for products aimed at women where men are literally portrayed as footstools. Whilst some of my photography may be seen to contribute to the conceit of idolised perfection, I am also aware of the reality gap with most peoples lives, and I am sometimes left unsure how to deal with it. I am often friends with the people I photograph, either before or because of our photography, and I am well aware of what they have to go through to achieve what they have - I know its unrealistic and idealised, yet also acknowledge that portrayals of male beauty have probably been that way since Grecian times. If anyone asks I am honest and outspoken about the unhealthy aspects of how to achieve such looks, and the drug use associated with body building and physique sports and the price athletes pay for it. I am good friends with the 60kg world champion bodybuilder in Asia, and although he is younger than me, he already has pain and issues with his knees, and is likely to suffer further problems with age as a result of the abuse he has put his body through. In his defence, it has funded a comfortable lifestyle for him and his parents that is far beyond the life he could have had as a farmer, so its not appropriate to condemn him for what he's achieved from my position of privilege. Its a complex world, but in the wider context of the abuse and degradation that some.people.suffer in their daily lives, physique sports at least has a conceit of "betterment". exhibit B, m'laud. Shot indoors at a gym in low light, exposure set to blacken the background, main light flash with small gates, rim light flash with small honeycomb grid. Some post processing to ensure the background was fully dark. Model was sports model competitor a few days before competition. He didn't rank competitively, but was an excellent model who understood physique.
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  34. Thank you for your kind comments. It was shot outdoors as an example of why I don't really like to shoot outdoors! The sun was fairly strong but diffused through some clouds, which helped make the shadows less hard. He was positioned in a way that have a three dimensional quality to the light on his physique, to help accentuate it. Ultimately with this type of photo, the emphasis is always on the physique, not so much the face,,especially when not looking at the camera. I deliberately kept the lens indoors (air con) so that when I took it outside, condensation would form on the front element, which combined with the strong light in the upper part of the photo from the sky reduced the contrast with some.l veiling haze, although I added a the a graduated filter in post production to add contrast back into the upper part of the image over his face and shoulders, and added a colour tint to "dirty it up" (give it a more gritty quality - which clearly worked based on your comment!). Obviously conventional portraits are less contrived and processed, and I completely understand the cultural issue when photographing minors in many places. In south east Asia the attitude to such things is much more relaxed, although unpleasant people may take advantage of that. One always has to work with the cultural sensibilities of where you are photographing - my photo was taken in Malaysia, a very populous Muslim country where public "nudity" can be very unacceptable, and athletes / models attitudes to the look of the photo and how they appear can be very different from European tastes. For example, in many countries physique photos is swimwear or underwear would be quite acceptable, whereas for most Malaysians it is not.
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  35. I watched a news item this morning including an interview with the new editor of "Attitude". He was trying to stop magazines giving an unrealistic expectation when showing male physiques. He himself was slightly built yet he had make up applied - dark powder under the ABs for instance to make them appear bigger and more pronounced and lighting was arranged to to enhance this effect too. It was amazing what difference it made without Photoshopping. He also metioned the dehydration guys suffer and we're not necessarily talking about competitions but simply for instagram where they'll take a few hundred pictures until they get one just right to send around. Apparently the problem is almost as great as caused by Photoshoping of women's bodies.
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  36. Forget the advantages of the XT2 new AF modes and see what the X-Pro2 can offer using the OVF as a red dot sight. This was published before the launch if the XT2. http://www.mirrorlessons.com/2016/03/30/fuji-x-pro2-ovf-birds-in-flight/
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  37. @dismason I agree that I think Fuji got the price "wrong" after their publicity at Photokina talking about competitive price. I think they know that with last weeks statements about another body priced the same as full frame could be released. Hasselblad could really be in trouble if their new owners don't understand and value their brand. The Pentax is a big camera compared to the other 2 - I think the "mirrorless" style of the Fuji and Hasselblad bodies has attracted attention.
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  38. Have you customised your display settings and turned off 'shooting mode'? The only drive modes that hide the shooting mode are the special effect ones (toy camera, multiple exposure etc). Bracketing and continuous modes do not. At the very least you should be able to toggle the Disp. Back button until you get the screen with all the shooting information on and it will be shown there.
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  39. The Fuji GFX and Hasselblad X1D use the same Sony sensor. The Pentax 645Z is an upgrade to the 645D which replaced the latters CCD sensor with a new 51mp CMOS device -,I assume the same sensor as the others. Therefore sensor performance is unlikely to be a reason to choose one over another. You're buying a system, to use for certain things. The X1D is very small, the Fuji quite modest sized, the Pentax less so. Lens support, use with flash systems, portability etc are probably deciding factors (plus whatever lenses you may already own that will fit them). Larger format are generally studio,,landscape and portrait cameras. Be aware you can get similar resolution from.full frame - which historically has had better noise management, frame rates and features - so again needs must be balanced with the strengths of a specific camera and format. Bigger pixels tend to give better results, but not always. Older CCD sensors are often outclassed by modern full frame CMOS sensors,unless they are in cameras with much larger sensors than those discussed here (e.g. From.Phase One). it will be interesting to see some bench tests of one of them.to see how the sensor really performs. edit: DX0 tested the 51Mp CMOS Sony device in the Pentax 645Z, but then withdrew the results! The results are widely leaked on other websites (overall 101, colour depth 26 bits, DR 14.7 EV, high iso 4505) which are exceptional scores, though must be balanced against full frame (overall 98, colour depth 26 bits, DR 13.9, high iso 3434 for example, varies by camera / sensor). So the benefits are relatively small, but about what you might expect for a 1.7x larger sensor - compare APS-C to full frame for similar improvements, and lots of people think that is a worthwhile improvement.
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  41. I agree with Marco. I shoot musicians often on stage and those mics are a pain in the ass.
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  42. Merlin,it is a pity that the microphone is covering so much of the face which you captured, together with the rest of the body, in a very expressive moment. I also like the contrast between the lit subject and the dark background and its framing/cropping. Thank you for sharing.
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  43. Ted McKee

    -DSF2684-HDRfb.jpg

    A shot taken yesterday afternoon at Temple of the Winds at Mountstewart Co Down Northern Ireland. One of the first shots I have taken with my wee secondhand X-E1 and 16-50mm lens I acquired last week. First impressions are good so far.
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  44. Ostravaczech

    Canyon Lake

    in the Superstition Mountains, AZ.
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  45. Ostravaczech

    Nice winter day...

    …in the neighborhood
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  46. I have heard of some compatibility issues between Canon flashes with the latest generation of cameras (X-Pro2, X-T2), but not with the X100T, so I don't want to promise that it will work, but I am almost sure that it will. The newest X Series cameras seem to have changed the pins used on the hotshoe, and one may now conflict with Canon compatible triggers, but I've read that Nikon compatible triggers can get around this issue because they use different pins that don't conflict. Personally I use Yongnuo 603C II triggers for all my off camera lighting (used with X100T, X-T2, X-T1), they're only around $30 for a pair and they can both transmit or receive. Since you can only fire the 600EX II-RT flash manually on the X100T, these manual flash triggers are a great solution that will cost far less than Pocket Wizards while accomplishing the same goal.
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  47. @excalibur2811 Thanks, glad you enjoyed my guide! What do you like to shoot?
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  48. Welcome to the community Donna! I'd love to see what you shoot with your adapted Holga lens! I gifted one to a friend for their Canon DSLR, but I never had a chance to try it out myself. Is it a fixed focus lens, or can you actually use focus peaking to focus?
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  49. Seeing as its days are numbered (and I'm always late to the party) here is my three year plus, real world review of the X-Pro 1. Long time coming, I know... http://capitalfaces.com/2015/11/07/3-year-real-world-review-fujifilm-x-pro-1/ Say what you want about the X-Pro 1 - and many do - but I wouldn't be taking pictures today if it wasn't for this camera and the joy that comes with using it. Even when the X-Pro 2 comes out, its going nowhere. Cheers all.
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  50. One battery per day for 7 days is 245 gms (35gm per battery x 7) or 1/2 of one lb. and cost last time I looked $72.00 (6 x $12, you get one battery free with the camera). The solar panel and the charger cost around $88 based on the Amazon prices and weigh a bit over one lb so the price and weight comparison is fairly line ball really. Here is the catch. If you take the spare batteries you are guaranteed a couple of hundred shots every day regardless of weather conditions (lets just assume that you have to take a couple of hundred shots every day on a hike). If you use the solar charger it takes four hours in perfect sunlight to recharge one battery. Perfect sunlight occurs when there is no cloud the sun is close to directly overhead and the solar panel is correctly aligned to the sun and is adjusted as the sun moves. In other words you will need to stay stationery for 4 hours in the middle of each day in a clear area with no cloud, shadow or rain to charge one battery. What happens if it rains or is cloudy for a couple of days? What happens if your companions for some strange reason don't want to stop walking in the middle of the day for four hours? Your choice but imo solar for these sort of applications does not stack up. If you are camped at a location for a couple of days then great (maybe) but if you are on the move forget it. My choice you be probably four batteries and one of those brick battery packs referred to above or if weight was an issue 7 or so batteries.
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