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PhoTom

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  1. @Gino, My apologies if you were offended by my comments. They were not aimed at you and I'm afraid you may have taken collateral damage. We have no mods here but self appointed mods and understandably this can cause problems occasionally.
  2. And the guys who used to travel around the American west in horse drawn carriages taking photos with glass plate cameras in the 19th century would consider people like @Larry to have had things really easy any would not understand what they were complaining about. For shooting action especially, guys like Larry did have it easier than guys like Matthew Brady. But I bet that guys like @Larry weren't the b!tch type that would have complained (no reference to the OP implied). Larry adds a refreshing perspective that should at least make one think about what he's saying regarding mastering your equipment and not relying 100% on your equipment like a crutch. I have no beef with the latter, but today's digital generation could use a more wider perspective in how they approach things. I'm sure there will be more than enough modern takes on the subject as this thread has already born out. As usual you are a habitual PITA and can't seem to mind your own business. When someone gets under your skin, you do not appear to have a good judgment/discretion button and the quantity or quality of some of your other posts do not negate what is a rafter of a character flaw.
  3. PhoTom

    Fuji XC 50-230mm mini review

    Thanks for posting your observations Rory. There are some nice images here. IMO, the best way to pick this lens up is through the double lens kit deal where one lens is practically free. Optics may be on par with the XF zooms, the build quality is a question mark though, without knowing what grade of polycarbonate was used. A good grade of PC may be preferable to the heavy metal of the XF lenses for impact resistance. The thin mount is what concerns me a little.
  4. I see nothing wrong with liking gear. It's just that in the digital age things are getting more out of balance and seem to be getting more so as time goes on. I think your exposure to it has increased, as a result of the internet and the ability to discuss it. I have a friend who has been like it for 20 years, and isn't active at all in photography forums, for example. A decade ago, people pawed over lens bench tests etc in the better quality photography press. If you like to read about photography rather than equipment, I suggest you take a look at the UKs "British Journal of Photography", which I think is also available as a digital subscription. It's all about photography with a little equipment news and reviews of interest to professionals. Yes. IAS. Internet amplification syndrome. Along with all the subsets of internet "types" that are proliferating.
  5. I'm thinking of setting up my X100 to shoot more like a film camera. I'm turning off image review and the rear LCD. Having image review makes me second guess myself and causes me to look back. With film you took your time and were looking for the next shot. Nowadays with chimping, we can afford to be sloppier. Anyways, a nice experiment that's possible with the X100.
  6. But is that long-range really practical? When I used Canon 24-70 and 70-200 was fully sufficinet. This is a very personal question. You may be the only one to answer that. Regarding the XC zooms, it's my understanding that they are made of polycarbonate. Polycarbonate is used for bullet proof glass. I don't know if it's the same grade or even how many different grades there are, but I am curious to know. If these "plastic" lenses are made of high grade polycarbonate, they may be tougher than we think. Polycarbonate likely has advantages over rigid metal builds as seen in XF lenses, such as better impact absorption. Lots of engineering grade synthetics have better characteristics than metal for photographic purposes - strength, rigidity, thermal characteristics, electromagnetic characteristics. The "metal" Fuji lenses are only metal skinned anyway, with a synthetic core, if the zooms are anything to go by (zoom them out, the extending barrel is clearly not metal). Sigma is using a new form of synthetic on their latest "art" series and they very clearly claim it's a better material for lenses than metal. The whole "metal = quality" is more about market expectations and perception than anything to do with actual material quality or durability. I don't think bullet proof glass is made from polycarbonate per se - as far as I am aware it is a bonded material including a number of substrates that is very good at dispersing heavy point source loads by deformation. Quite different from the kind of things cameras and lenses are made from, as far as I am aware. "Bullet-resistant glass is usually constructed using polycarbonate, thermoplastic, and layers of laminated glass..." This is taken from Wikipedia. You can believe them or not. Some characteristics of polycarbonate from another source: excellent physical properties excellent toughness very good heat resistance fair chemical resistance can be made transparent moderate to high price fair processing Now, there are different grades of polycarbonate and I don't necessarily expect XC lenses to be of the toughest grade unless I hear otherwise from an authoritative source. I think that if I was to drop a lens, one made from a tough grade of polycarbonate would disperse the shock load more efficiently than a metal lens. One thing that concerns me though is that the mounts on the XC lenses are very thin and don't inspire confidence.
  7. ...or, how to spend less time on forums and more time shooting. Love it. I guess you picked this up from reading it on the other Fuji forum then logged onto this forum and repeated the link and talked about spending less time on forums. Nice quirky sense of humour you have there. Kiwi, i would expect nothing less of a post from the likes of you. I never said I was completely immune from the gear-head syndromes going around. But it sounds like someone hit a nerve. Frankly, we need articles like this from time to time to keep things real. Now there may be a subset of forum users who already have a balanced approach and I suppose this need not apply to them as much.
  8. I see nothing wrong with liking gear. It's just that in the digital age things are getting more out of balance and seem to be getting more so as time goes on.
  9. The X10, X20 and now X30 have all been priced the same in the US, US$600 at launch. What's changed is that the market is more competitive and saturated than ever. The sensor size seems to be a problem for many. In addition, some buyers of X10s and X20s have migrated up to APS sensors and may not want to look back.
  10. PhoTom

    Faulty BC-65N charger, but well done Fuji

    Good to hear that Fuji came through for you.
  11. PhoTom

    Is this worth the upgrade ?

    Question - Does anyone know if the new X 100 T will have a PC terminal. I have a X 100 Black LE that I love but am frustrated that it doesn't have a PC terminal. I use it as an available light only camera since the built-in flash doesn't really have any power and you have to take the lens hood off to use it. I have 2 X Pro 1's and for these I either use my handle mounted Metz 45 with a PC cord or my studio strobes with a PC cord. I use a flash meter for correct exposure and I don't need the TTL function. I never liked putting a flash directly into the hot shoe as it upset the balance of the camera and I prefer a handle mount. The quality of automatic flashes that read the reflected light has been good for many years. All my X cameras have a Thumbs up grip in the hot shoe the model that has the slot for accessories as I still use my old Leica 35, 28 and 21 optical viewfinders in this slot. Some old habits die hard but I can frame quickly using these finders and when using a strobe I'm not so much in a hurry. So again, I hope that the new X 100 model and also any new X Pro model will have a PC terminal. Thanks in advance for any information. Regards, F William Baker Dallas, Texas You might want to invest in an inexpensive set of wireless triggers. Same thought. I can recommend Cowboy Studios. They work off camera with my X100 and Vivitar 283s. http://www.amazon.com/CowboyStudio-NPT-04-Channel-Wireless-Receiver/dp/B002W3IXZW
  12. There have also been many complaints from X100S users regarding AF. Many who had upgraded felt cheated and angry at Fuji. I have heard users who owned both cameras who said as much. The classic X100© has oft been reported to produce more pleasing JPEGS, and is easier to PP RAW images with the software of your choice. I have a 2nd Gen Fuji X camera so I know about the speed enhancements and if that is a priority then as has been suggested by myself and others to the OP, wait for the 3rd Gen replacement which probably will be announced next month in Germany. With all things on the internet, unhappy people are way more vocal than happy people, even if they are in the minority. Agreed. Bad news seems to travel much faster than good news. And there were probably even more original X100© users who complained because of perceived shortcomings. Some legit and some from unreasonable expectations.
  13. But is that long-range really practical? When I used Canon 24-70 and 70-200 was fully sufficinet. This is a very personal question. You may be the only one to answer that. Regarding the XC zooms, it's my understanding that they are made of polycarbonate. Polycarbonate is used for bullet proof glass. I don't know if it's the same grade or even how many different grades there are, but I am curious to know. If these "plastic" lenses are made of high grade polycarbonate, they may be tougher than we think. Polycarbonate likely has advantages over rigid metal builds as seen in XF lenses, such as better impact absorption.
  14. PhoTom

    some X-A1 photos taken with XC 50-230

    More great shots! Are you using supplemental light for any of these?
  15. Simon, I overlooked the possibility that your missed focus shots were caused by motion in the frame. Meaning that a quicker focusing camera may help, which again points to the X100T. Motion in the frame is usually caused by too slow of a shutter speed or the camera moving when the photo is taken (pressing the shutter release hard as opposed to gently squeezing it). The only problem a quicker focusing camera, like the XT1, will solve is shots not being captured exactly when you wanted them. You can often solve this by anticipating when you want to capture the photo. Being able to see outside the frame with the X100's OVF will also help with this. It also bears mentioning that there were many usability upgrades on the X100S that may be more important than the faster AF. Remember, the X100S focuses faster the more challenging the light is, combine that with its wider dynamic range and 14 bit files, and the X100S is a lot better in low light. Thanks for pointing that out regarding motion in the frame. What you said is what I meant, meaning subject motion or movement. I guess a poor (rushed) choice of words on my end. Regarding the superiority of the X100S, I agree there have been some usability improvements. I've also seen reports reports on the dynamic range showing the edge for the Classic X100© in JPEG DR and an edge for the X100S in RAW DR. Also if the X100S has faster AF it would be in bright light due to the PDAF pixels added near the center of the frame. PDAF performs better in plentiful light. The CDAF kicks in at lower light. Interestingly, some X100© users upgraded mostly based on Fuji's promise of faster AF, and most of the complaints RE: AF involved low light scenarios, not daylight. There have been reports of the X100© being as good or a little better than the X100S in low light AF after the latest firmware update. There have also been many complaints from X100S users regarding AF. Many who had upgraded felt cheated and angry at Fuji. I have heard users who owned both cameras who said as much. The classic X100© has oft been reported to produce more pleasing JPEGS, and is easier to PP RAW images with the software of your choice. I have a 2nd Gen Fuji X camera so I know about the speed enhancements and if that is a priority then as has been suggested by myself and others to the OP, wait for the 3rd Gen replacement which probably will be announced next month in Germany.
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