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johnwillyums

Iridient for Windows

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raagamuffin

johnwillyums, 

I did end up going with iridient on a mac for my raw conversion. Though it does feel like software that a geek would use/write, I am one, so I feel at home :) 

So I use iridient for raw conversion and Affinity Photo for editing. Affinity Photo does crash if you are processing a large number of layers though on 16bit XT-2 TIFFs (approx. 150mb), I am trying to set up a scenario to duplicate it so I can file a bug report. 

All the best in your RAW travels. 

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artuk

May I suggest that 16bit tiff files is probably un-necessary? For single session edits where you are not saving and reopening and re-editing the same file many times, a 100% quality jpeg or better a jpeg2000 with high bit depth colour should suffice - I often do a single session edit as the final stage after raw development on jpegs and don't feel I lose anything compared to working with tiffs (which just eat up storage and memory). Maybe try and it and see if you can see th difference. It may depend what you are editing - I rarely adjust colour etc, as that's better done in raw, but for example cloning or sharpening etc then jpegs should be fine.

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johnwillyums

How are you liking Affinity, raagamuffin? 

I've got it installed, plus the Iridient Windows beta, I also have Lightroom.

In the past, I used to open Lr automatically, when I stuck an SD card in the pc, I could import them, do some limited editing, use the various presets, also Nik Efex Pro, Photomatrix Pro HDR software. Also, Fuj Organik presets, plus several other presets

Now I have some better software, I think I'll copy, and paste, the DCIM file to the desktop, then I'll rename it, with date, and a couple of words eg 25.11.16MikeFiWakefield,

From there I can take the RAF files through Iridient, convert them to DNGs, and then import them into Lr, or Affinity. where I can add the finishing touches.

Then export, back to the desktop folder, from there I can preview in Picasa, where I find it much easier to do things, like crop, or straighten the horizon etc.

I'll export the final finished image back to the desktop folder. Which should now contain a subfolder of Fuji DNG files, and another folder containing pics that were RAW, that have been coverted, edited, and reduced in size, for easy posting online (I post to Facebook pages, and a couple of Fuji forums.)

I've got the Affinity tutorial videos open in my browser, but I keep putting off, watching them and trying out Affinity. So far it's not been the focus of my attention, I have to admit I'm not very good at learning how to use some software. From the couple of tutorials I've seen, so far, it does look much easier, and more intuitive to use.

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artuk
11 hours ago, johnwillyums said:

 

From there I can take the RAF files through Iridient, convert them to DNGs, and then import them into Lr, or Affinity. where I can add the finishing touches.

Then export, back to the desktop folder, from there I can preview in Picasa, where I find it much easier to do things, like crop, or straighten the horizon etc.

I'll export the final finished image back to the desktop folder. Which should now contain a subfolder of Fuji DNG files, and another folder containing pics that were RAW, that have been coverted, edited, and reduced in size, for easy posting online (I post to Facebook pages, and a couple of Fuji forums.)

I've got the Affinity tutorial videos open in my browser, but I keep putting off, watching them and trying out Affinity. So far it's not been the focus of my attention, I have to admit I'm not very good at learning how to use some software. From the couple of tutorials I've seen, so far, it does look much easier, and more intuitive to use.

If you are using Iridient to convert to DNG, then I assume you are not doing any edits in Iridient?  I only ask as I would assume that any edits in Iridient were not saved into the DNG raw file that you output (I could be wrong - I have found very few raw converters which will save out a raw format file complete with adjustments).

FWIW - I don't use a LR catalog or similar.  I create a folder for each year, within that a folder for each theme or session (e.g. Thailand April) then within that create folders with the date taken and some text of content.  When I raw covert and output, I create a subfolder in the source folder named by the raw development tool (I use more than 1) (e.g. SilkyPix) and output any completed work into there.

Obviously this lacks the ability to search for a person within having an idea where their photos might be, although Windows allows keywording as metadata I believe, so there are ways to do that if you want.

If you are using Iridient to convert RAF to DNG and you are not editing, then I must ask - why? 

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veejaycee

Surely you can simply use the free stand alone Adobe DNG converter then take it into whatever software you use.

There are also programs like MetaRaw which I once used with an old version of PS that would not recognise Fuji X trans files. It basically does the same by converting to DNG then opening the file into (in my case) PS/PSE ACR. I don't think you can export to LR though.

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johnwillyums

As I say, I use Iridient, just convert the files to DNGs, then I can edit them in Lightroom, or Affinity.

My copy of Lightroom doesn't recognise the files from the new sensor, so I use Iridient, to convert them.

That is the sole purpose of this free Beta, it's not an editing suite.

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artuk
1 hour ago, veejaycee said:

Surely you can simply use the free stand alone Adobe DNG converter then take it into whatever software you use.

 

That's why I was asking, as if the DNG files don't include adjustments made in Iridient, then its just serving the same purpose as Adobe Bridge, which I free.

@johnny Adobe offer a tool called Adobe Bridge which allows you to batch convert raw files into DNG format. If you aren't using Iridient to do raw development there's no point in using it - although it may well produce better results on its own than Adobe, which has never been the best choice for image quality with XTrans files.

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Christopher

I'm looking forward to the release of the MacOS version of Irridient X-Transformer, I think it will be out later this month. I think it's a brilliant solution for Adobe Lightroom users that don't want to switch to a new RAW processor or editing workflow, but who also find Adobe's X-Trans RAW rendering to be less than ideal.

With Irridient's new X-Trans to DNG convertor, one can simply convert the Fujifilm RAW files to Adobe DNG, but without losing the fine details that Adobe's own RAW rendering would, then import those into Lightroom for super fast 'bayer sensor style' post processing. The best of both worlds!

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johnwillyums

This is a free beta, artuk. The reason I was keen to try it, was because I read everywhere that it is the best RAW converter for Fuj X-Trans RAF files.

I haven't had a chance to try it properly yet, so I can't speak to it's effectiveness, other than to say, it works.

This beta is for Fuji only, there will more Iridient developers coming out, for Nikon, Canon, Sony etc. So it looks like this is going to be way the company operates, bespoke RAW converters for different sensors, and manufacturers.

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artuk
1 hour ago, Christopher said:

I'm looking forward to the release of the MacOS version of Irridient X-Transformer, I think it will be out later this month. I think it's a brilliant solution for Adobe Lightroom users that don't want to switch to a new RAW processor or editing workflow, but who also find Adobe's X-Trans RAW rendering to be less than ideal.

With Irridient's new X-Trans to DNG convertor, one can simply convert the Fujifilm RAW files to Adobe DNG, but without losing the fine details that Adobe's own RAW rendering would, then import those into Lightroom for super fast 'bayer sensor style' post processing. The best of both worlds!

I understand now - though not having ever used Adobe standard DNG files before, I did some discussion a long time ago that it was little more than a "container" file format that had a different native raw file embedded in it when converting to DNG from other formats.  That wouldn't fit what you describe - and I support your view that the Adobe quality of X Trans file conversion has historically been pretty poor compared to rivals - so maybe this is a solution to that problem for people who simply have to use Lightroom.

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raagamuffin

johnwillyums, 

I like Affinity. It is not as good as Photoshop, (of course, my experience with Ps is limited). At least from what I remember using it with Ps elements. But for editing without a lot of complex transformations, it is pretty good. Incidentally, Affinity also imports RAW from X-T2 (and presumably Pro2). I haven't used the batch mode as much, though I much like the Iridient batch mode. 

As for quality, I have found some differences in the rendition of Affinity for the same RAW file vs. Iridient. I prefer Iridient's version, I think, though it is very subtle. My current workflow is to get the .raf files into directory structures (as artuk mentions) and then to open them up and work with Iridient (changing exposure etc.). Then I use Affinity if further editing is needed (I use .tiff exports because I find them perhaps a more open standard (its from the mid 80s!) than DNG which seems an Adobe creation :) )

 

Affinity does crash when you add more than 5 layers in a .tif file. FYI. 

It looks like I will be using this setup going forward for a while and see how it works..

 

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johnwillyums

Raagamuffin, thank you for your thoughtful reply.

So, in effect, I can watch the tutorials, get a bit of knowledge about how Affinity operates, and use that as a both a converter, and editor.

Or, convert in Iridient Developer, and open in either Affinity, or Lightroom, for editing.

Given that you, and others, have said Iridient's conversions are the best, this developer beta, has come along at an ideal moment.

By the way, I normally save as tiff, storage is a problem though. I like to keep RAW files, and a tiff of all pics. Problem is, I always end up with several copies of any given image, a .tiff, a jpg, a DNG, and an RAF.

That's taking up a lot of space, and most of it is multiple copies of a similar image, that I've taken, to make sure I've got "the one".

So the vast majority is mediocre rejects! I need to exercise some discipline, and delete the dross. :-)

 

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veejaycee

Storage is very cheap these days. You can get 3 TB external drive for under a ton.

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artuk
1 hour ago, veejaycee said:

Storage is very cheap these days. You can get 3 TB external drive for under a ton.

Whilst that is true, I support John's sentiment to get rid of duplicates.  If I shoot a physique portrait,  I may have 100 raw+jpegs of which only a handful are worthy of further work- it takes courage to delete but its good discipline to be able to identify the rubbish, the average and the excellent and keep only the latter!  I shot about 1.5-2Tb over a 9 month period last year, but with an appropriate cull to remove rubbish and obvious duplicates it will come down to less than 1tb.  it's not about the storage - its about only keeping what you actually need, rather than digital hoarding.  we don't wont to end up the digital equivalent of those people whose houses can barely be entered for all the rubbish stuffing every room!

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Christopher

I tend to be a digital hoarder, but I've been trying to be better! I hang on to too many unnecessary shots that are essentially duplicates, and I'm always running out of storage or moving files onto external drives. Lately I've been going through old sessions and clearing out extraneous shots, I find it's easier to do well after the photoshoot has passed and I'm less emotionally attached. It's tough to find the time to clean house though, culling shortly after import really is a good habit.

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artuk

@christopher I tend to mark things for deletion during the process of selecting for post processing. Then once I'm happy with the photos I've edited and exported, its easier to delete the rubbish as its already marked. FWIW I use a regime of:

- delete mark = technical failure or obvious rubbish

- 1* = poor photo similar to delete mark when examined later

- 2* = duplicate of other(s) I will work.on

- 3* = average

- 4* or 5* = to be worked on

So generally delete marks go straight away and 1-3* go qt the end of the editing process.

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veejaycee

I keep Raw & tiff (sometimes more than one version) and JPGs of the different versions and in different sizes.

My reasoning is thus: I keep the RAW files because digital software is constantly evolving and improving, enabling me to improve on past developments of favourite images. I keep tiff files, sometimes different versions (BW, Col, Crop) at full size and resolution as my basic templates to be sized then sharpened for output as print (although I rarely print now). I keep Jpgs at various sizes and compressions for posting on different websites at max size allowed - I hate viewing small images and don't wish to impose them on others. If images are simply not up to standard I bin them.

A case for retaining tiffs. A tiff file of an 1800s picture of my Grandfather mounted and in the uniform of the Earl of Leicestershire's Yeomanry originally rephotographed on film and scanned to tiff (all that was available then). As new software has been released I've been able to copy and redo the original or a later copy, each time bringing out more detail from otherwise faded tones and apparently blocked shadows. The original photograph was stupidly thrown away when the family member from whom I borrowed it died.

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nippa

Just been playing with this windows version today and quite like it. Very similar to PhotoNinja though.

Can anyone explain why the DNG format cannot be read by PhotoNinja 1.2.4 or my Leica Camera?

I haven't tried other editors yet although the DNG is read by Lightroom. Has the DNG format changed in recent years?

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veejaycee

I've been following several threads elsewhere about using Iridient X Transformer in or with LR but it seems a lot of fiddling to is to be done if one wishes to retain the raw. I shall leave it for a while and see how others get on with it (find it hard to change my method of working these days). Actually I don't have a problem with LR and no one seems to see anything wrong in my pictures so I'm happy to keep working as I am. That is - raw edit in LR with NR and sharpening off - export to PS. - NR in Nik Define then do anything else including NIK filters. Lastly I sharpen with NIK output sharpener at full size leaving it a little short of full sharpen and saved as a tiff. My final sharpen is in PS with the high pass filter at output size/res (for web or print), saved as jpg.

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nippa

I'm also quite happy with LR5 and rarely use PhotoNinja now.

For absolute sharpness I still use LR5 with FocusMagic (which strips the exif ).

Although Define and the Topaz sharpener are on my desktop I've never found anything to better than the old FM.

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veejaycee

Hi Nippa. Are you processing JPGs or do you shoot raw and convert to DNG for LR?

Vic

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nippa

I normally shoot RAW and Jpeg but it was the RAWs that I was decoding into DNG for processing in other editors.

Irridient output is clearly non standard DNG  although I thought that couldn't happen!

 From Photoninja comes a clue  " Can't decompress RAW file ; Unsupported filter pattern(0)"

I've tried various output options but the DNG file is always unrecognised by anything I own other than Lightroom.

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GeoffC

Hows the general use on Iridient going guys, since these earlier comments.

 

I've recently downloaded a demo version of Iridient X-Transformer in the hope it proves a credible alternative to Adobe DNG Converter.

 

I only use Windows and PS CS5 < which doesn't recognise XE-1 or XE-2 RAW.

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veejaycee

Besides it being the answer to your prayers enabling, you to process DNGs in PS CS5 ACR (same as me but I also have LR6), but it handles the tricky demosaicing with which Adobe has problems. Below are my base settings for IXT if it is a help as a starting point. Sharpen with Nik sharpener for best results (IMO) - not LR or PS sharpening.

Vic

 

IXT settings.jpg

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