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If the Fuji X100S battery life so terrible?


Salcap

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Yes, it is. After being used to Canon 1D MkIII and MkIV batteries which would give me four to 6 full football games of service having the Fuji poop out after a couple hundred shots(or sooner) is frustrating.

COLD is a killer for the batteries. Out ice fishing and 20 below zero(f) temperatures and the batteries die within 10-20 minutes. Having to keep changing them with mittens and gloves is a real pain. Already lost a battery dropping it on ice covered snow.

Add in the battery level drops all of a sudden, almost without warning.

Must be a way to get better performance.

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Kiwi - when using the cameeras in cold weather the performance is worse than a US Politician.

I live in a cold climate. I photograph in temperatures below zero(farenheit) often during the winter. The fuji batteries die fast in the cold compared to either the Canon EOS 1 series as well as the Panasonic Lumix LX7 point and shoot.

This is MY experience in use, not from reading about it.

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This has become a pointless discussion. If you don't like the battery life, compensate. But please drop the shrill whining. The Fujis have so many advantages that the battery life is a minor issue, an obvious non-starter. Live with it or change cameras. But nothing original or constructive is being said here any longer.

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Personally I don't see the problem...approx 200 shots from a single battery charge, carry extra batteries if you need more. 2 extra will give you 600 shots in total.......does anyone really need more than that in a single days shooting?.......if you do carry another battery or two, it's not as if they take up loads of room or are prohibitively expensive.

At the end of the day, slot the used batteries into the little charger thingy and hey presto, you will be all ready to go again tomorrow!!

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Except when the charger is not working. Apparently that happens quite often. I had problems with X100s as the batteries were not charging, I even threw one battery away. Finally I took the camera back to shop and told them it was likely to be the charger. Result: camera, charger and 2 batteries went in for 5 weeks, got sent to England where charger and one battery was replaced, with apologies that this simple matter was so time consuming and complicated to fix. Nothing wrong with camera.

Battery life with Fujifilm X-series cameras is not all that great, I agree. Having short turn-off time, not using to LCD and turning the thing off between shots helps.

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This is MY experience in use, not from reading about it.

Well batteries are a significant part of my work life and have been for 20 years so I do have just a little more experience with them than you do I suspect and I will stand by what I said above. Obviously if you want to leave your batteries outside overnight buried in the snow then yes you will have some issues but I was assuming that most sensible people will be keeping their batteries inside in heated houses overnight most of the time. Maybe I will write a 20 line disclaimer next time.

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This is MY experience in use, not from reading about it.

Well batteries are a significant part of my work life and have been for 20 years so I do have just a little more experience with them than you do I suspect and I will stand by what I said above. Obviously if you want to leave your batteries outside overnight buried in the snow then yes you will have some issues but I was assuming that most sensible people will be keeping their batteries inside in heated houses overnight most of the time. Maybe I will write a 20 line disclaimer next time.

I don't leave batteries buried in snow - but I regularly shoot wintertime in temperatures 10-40 below zero. "Sensible People"? You don't get cold weather shots without cold weather and the cameras should perform in it. Changing batteries in bitter cold is not that easy - especialy with gloves or mittens and blizzard conditions.

As for shooting experience, started shooting professionally when the Nikon F was the Pro model on the marketplace.

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@Deardorff, sounds like the Fuji isn't for you. So, sir, move on.

This is the answer? The cameras are nice, images are as well. Battery life sucks in the conditions I am in often. Lucky for me no Antarctic time and 60-70 below temps coming up.

The answer is not "move on", which is the solution of an idiot. It is to have Fuji make batteries that will perform in all weather conditions so we can take full advantage of the quality the system otherwise gives us.

Facing reality with our gear is what most do - not quit or tell others to do so. You solution sounds like the religious jerks I meet too often.

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@Deardorff, you have a small problem with not liking the answers you hear. I've never been called a "religious jerk" before, and had to grin reading that one. The battery problem you rail about is an old, old complaint. Fuji is aware of it, and if easily solved, would correct that issue in a heartbeat. They haven't, it isn't easy and your whining isn't the most constructive approach take. Anymore than calling members here names. As Matt suggests, bring additional batteries. As I suggest, if that doesn't work for you, the Fuji isn't your camera.

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There are only a few technologies used in modern battery production, and I doubt Fuji is directly involved in their manufacture. For a given type, battery life is proportional to size, and the demands of the camera.

Some of the compromises made in designing camera batteries err towards compactness and light weight, at the expense of longevity. DSLR users have been spoilt by large batteries that last all day. If people want small batteries to last longer, they need to turn off any circuits (AF, screen, viewfinder, etc) that require their power. For my pocket Sony P&S I always carry five, even for a day out. For my Fuji X10, I carry four, and can use them all in a morning's shooting.

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I've stopped using the LCD and turned off a number of other functions (many at the advice of @ranger in a previous street shooting thread). Batteries last far longer.

I too carry multiple batteries. In New England, where temperatures in the winter get pretty cold, I rarely go thru more than two in a half day's shooting. Frankly, it's not an issue I worry about at all.

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I was initially surprised at the battery life of my X100 having come from a D90, but its easily solved buying more batters. Thats a far more simple solution Im sure that Fuji breaking the laws of physics.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Guys,

I have a completely different twist. In India, it takes good money to buy a X100s in the first place. Replacement batteries from Fuji are not cheap (read bl**dy expensive) and do not get me started on the hood and the case. Not only that, batteries manufactured by other companies are not available here as they are for you guys.

So, yes, if the X100s battery lasted longer I would really, really, been happier!

:)

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Has anyone considered using the Fuji power adapter / fake battery thing (don't know it's real name or part number) with an external battery pack like the pros use to keep their flash guns going? Just a thought.

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Yes, no wonder, with all the technology in it this camera eats batteries...

It's not Fuji's fault.. Couple of years ago, when i was trying to buy some good rechargeable batteries, i researched a bit into battery technology and realised that it still is in prehistoric ages..

Making a battery is a bit like alchemy, basically mixing deadly chemicals that later will store energy.. The trouble is these chemicals are highly volatile and i think a Toshiba or sony plant blew up and scared the poo out of the Japanese... So they are out sourcing it from places like China...

As far as i know we are lucky we have come this far.. ONLY because the army special forces wanted good batteries for their Night Vision Scopes for their clandestine operations, otherwise we wouldn't even have Lithium batteries..

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Has anyone considered using the Fuji power adapter / fake battery thing (don't know it's real name or part number) with an external battery pack like the pros use to keep their flash guns going? Just a thought.

If you want to use a nice light camera and have 2 kg of batteries strapped to your hip and connected to the camera by a cable feel free to go ahead. I find it far more convenient to have two spare batteries that weigh a few grams each in the pocket of my camera bag.

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Yes, no wonder, with all the technology in it this camera eats batteries...

At no faster rate then any other camera but because the market requires and small form factor and a light weight compromises have to be made.

On the overall subject of battery technology if you do any in depth research you will find that the Seven Sisters control most of the patents and until the time comes when oil is no longer a convenient and inexpensive source of energy battery technology will not move forward and anything other than a crawl.

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Has anyone considered using the Fuji power adapter / fake battery thing (don't know it's real name or part number) with an external battery pack like the pros use to keep their flash guns going? Just a thought.

If you want to use a nice light camera and have 2 kg of batteries strapped to your hip and connected to the camera by a cable feel free to go ahead. I find it far more convenient to have two spare batteries that weigh a few grams each in the pocket of my camera bag.

Good for you. It was only an idea. Just trying to think outside the box.

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Just want to add my battery experience to the mix. I own the original Fuji battery, 2 Wasabi batteries and one no name off ebay bsttery. I have the Fuji charger and the Wasabi charger. About 450 actuations. The best I've done on any battery and charger combo is 52 shots. Worst 23. The 52 was after the hint of keeping the battery in the charger past when the light says it is done charging and wait until the battery itself is cool. I don't review the shots until I download. I've tried both using LCD or the OFV/EVF for an entire battery session. Nothing seems to help much!!!! I use the Canon charger for both my G12 and my 60D, charging both both Canon batteries and Wasabi and can usually get between 250-300 shots. (yes probably different mAh but vastly different in number of shots per battery)

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