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stuartm

Review: Kipon EOS-FX A, Adapter for Canon EF Lenses with mechanical aperture for Fuji X Cameras

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stuartm

Hi, I've been using this adapter for a couple of months now, mainly for wedding photography, so I thought I would write up a brief review.

First, a little bit about me. I'm a wedding photographer and videographer, based in the North West of England, and working mainly in Wirral, Cheshire & Liverpool. I have recently changed from Canon to Fuji for my photography, but I still use Canon for video, so I still have some Canon EF lenses, and it's nice to have the option of using them on my Fuji Cameras.

This adapter allows me to do that, and the main lens I use in this way is my 100mm f/2, which unfortunately has no Fuji equivalent at this time.

Here's a couple of pics of the lens + adapter on one of my X-E1s:

p1819291104-6.jpg

p1854655790-6.jpg

I find this setup quite comfortable to use, with just enough heft to help you hold the camera steady.

The main feature about this adapter is that it includes an iris/aperture that can be manually adjusted on the adapter. This is necessary, as the aperture in the lenses is not adjustable when the lens isn't fitted to a compatible Canon camera. Here's a pic of the adapter on it's own, followed by one of the iris fully open, and then closed to its smallest size:

p1673701781-6.jpg

p1756900431-6.jpg

p1649120941-6.jpg

The aperture dial on the adapter has positions marked 1-6. Position 1 is fully open, but position 6 is only partially closed, the minimum aperture position requires the dial to be turned further. An important factor is that the iris is in a different place then the one in the lens, causing some side effects.

Here's a shot with the Iris fully open:

p1653264640-6.jpg

The above shot was with ISO set to 1600, and shutter set to auto, the camera used a shutter of 1/420 to get the correct exposure. Below are a selection of images taken with different iris settings, as you will see, the camera increases the exposure duration as the aperture gets smaller.

Iris set to position 4 (1/250):

p1759229434-6.jpg

Iris set to position 6 (1/170):

p1812850337-6.jpg

Iris set to between 6 and minimum position (1/50):

p1669977306-6.jpg

Iris set to minimum position(1/2.8):

p1656778286-6.jpg

As you can see, closing the iris causes vignetting. In my opinion it is acceptable up to position 6, but after that, it gets to be too much. Fortunately this is usually enough to cope with full sunlight when combined with a suitable shutter speed.

In conclusion, would I recommend this adapter. I think it's ideal for those who, like me, have some EF lenses they want to use with their fuji camera. On the other hand, if I was starting from scratch, I would recommend getting a lens with an aperture dial, so that the adapter does not require it's own aperture adjustment. This would avoid the vignetting problems.

Here are a couple of real world wedding photographs I've taken using this lens and adapter:

p1687271867-6.jpg

p1756280426-6.jpg

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Guest

Thanks for sharing your review, I've been quite curious about this adaptor. It sounds like you just have to guess the aperture setting on the adaptor, and eventually you'll learn the good 'zones'. It's too bad there's no way to set a more precise aperture.

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SnapPuppy

Thanks for that, I've been thinking of investing in one of these. Have you tried with the latest X-E1 firmware and focus peaking, is it of any help?

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artuk

Thanks for sharing your review, I've been quite curious about this adaptor. It sounds like you just have to guess the aperture setting on the adaptor, and eventually you'll learn the good 'zones'. It's too bad there's no way to set a more precise aperture.

Christopher, I have a similar Novoflex adaptor for Minolta AF mount, which also has an unmarked aperture ring that moves the aperture control pin that is normally adjusted by a motor in the lens mount in the body of the camera.

The best way to gauge the aperture set is to open the aperture fully, observe the shutter speed the camera sets, and then close the aperture until the shutter speed has decreased by the required number of stops.

The other approach is to look into the lens, to see the size of the aperture opening - but since aperture size is (I believe) on a non linear scale (logarithmic?) then it can be very hard to judge by eye.

I am curious why closing the aperture on the Canon lens causes vignetting? As it is a full rrame lens, the imaging circle should be much greater than the APS-C sensor size. I wonder if it is a mechanical issue?

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veejaycee

I am curious why closing the aperture on the Canon lens causes vignetting? As it is a full rrame lens, the imaging circle should be much greater than the APS-C sensor size. I wonder if it is a mechanical issue?

Is it due to the actual placement of the adapter's aperture diaphragm in relation to the front of the lens and the sensor?

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Niko

I have a RainbowImaging version of this adaptor. I have more or less the same results you have, stuartm. Most of time, I use fully open or until scale 2 to avoid excessive vignetting basically to have sufficient DoF for portraits for EF 85mm f/1.8 and Vivitar 105mm f/2.5.

Knowing the limitations, I consider it worth the money compared to default adaptor.

I know this effect is caused by the placement of the diafragm in relation to the lens and the sensor: the diafragm placement for each lens is carefully planned by the lens maker compared to the position of the sensor/film.

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WilzWorkz7

Looks good. Would get one to use with my old EOS entry level lens.

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stuartm

Thanks for that, I've been thinking of investing in one of these. Have you tried with the latest X-E1 firmware and focus peaking, is it of any help?

Yes, It helps a lot. The 3x zoom works well for me unless the subject is moving, in which case no zoom, and hope for the best. The focus peaking is definitely much better than nothing :)

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stuartm

Thanks for sharing your review, I've been quite curious about this adaptor. It sounds like you just have to guess the aperture setting on the adaptor, and eventually you'll learn the good 'zones'. It's too bad there's no way to set a more precise aperture.

Christopher, I have a similar Novoflex adaptor for Minolta AF mount, which also has an unmarked aperture ring that moves the aperture control pin that is normally adjusted by a motor in the lens mount in the body of the camera.

The best way to gauge the aperture set is to open the aperture fully, observe the shutter speed the camera sets, and then close the aperture until the shutter speed has decreased by the required number of stops.

The other approach is to look into the lens, to see the size of the aperture opening - but since aperture size is (I believe) on a non linear scale (logarithmic?) then it can be very hard to judge by eye.

I am curious why closing the aperture on the Canon lens causes vignetting? As it is a full rrame lens, the imaging circle should be much greater than the APS-C sensor size. I wonder if it is a mechanical issue?

The key thing to remember is that the adapter does not operate the aperture within the lens. The adapter has its own aperture between the lens and the camera. I'm not a lens design expert, but I'm pretty sure this positioning of the aperture is the problem, as normally, narrowing the aperture within a lens would not cause vignetting.

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WilzWorkz7

In short, the place where the lens shouldn't be obstructed is now blocked by the aperture blades hence the vignetting. Normally the back of the lens is close to the film/sensor.

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artuk

I am curious why closing the aperture on the Canon lens causes vignetting? As it is a full rrame lens, the imaging circle should be much greater than the APS-C sensor size. I wonder if it is a mechanical issue?

Is it due to the actual placement of the adapter's aperture diaphragm in relation to the front of the lens and the sensor?

The adaptor puts the Canon lens into the correct "flange distance" on the Fuji mount. The only thing I wondered was if the Fuji lens throat, or that of the adaptor, is too narrow to cause physical vignetting - but in theory that would be the case at all apertures.

Therefore I am rather confused - the aperture set cannot change the imaging circle size, but clearly something is obstructing the view from a very small aperture through the exit pupil at the rear of the lens and onto the sensor.

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artuk

Thanks for sharing your review, I've been quite curious about this adaptor. It sounds like you just have to guess the aperture setting on the adaptor, and eventually you'll learn the good 'zones'. It's too bad there's no way to set a more precise aperture.

Christopher, I have a similar Novoflex adaptor for Minolta AF mount, which also has an unmarked aperture ring that moves the aperture control pin that is normally adjusted by a motor in the lens mount in the body of the camera.

The best way to gauge the aperture set is to open the aperture fully, observe the shutter speed the camera sets, and then close the aperture until the shutter speed has decreased by the required number of stops.

The other approach is to look into the lens, to see the size of the aperture opening - but since aperture size is (I believe) on a non linear scale (logarithmic?) then it can be very hard to judge by eye.

I am curious why closing the aperture on the Canon lens causes vignetting? As it is a full rrame lens, the imaging circle should be much greater than the APS-C sensor size. I wonder if it is a mechanical issue?

The key thing to remember is that the adapter does not operate the aperture within the lens. The adapter has its own aperture between the lens and the camera. I'm not a lens design expert, but I'm pretty sure this positioning of the aperture is the problem, as normally, narrowing the aperture within a lens would not cause vignetting.

Ok! I didn't realise the adaptor has it's own aperture! My MAF mount equivalent moves the lens aperture via a pin - I assumed without having owned a Canon the design was similar, but obviously not!

My mistake...

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stuartm

Thanks for sharing your review, I've been quite curious about this adaptor. It sounds like you just have to guess the aperture setting on the adaptor, and eventually you'll learn the good 'zones'. It's too bad there's no way to set a more precise aperture.

Christopher, I have a similar Novoflex adaptor for Minolta AF mount, which also has an unmarked aperture ring that moves the aperture control pin that is normally adjusted by a motor in the lens mount in the body of the camera.

The best way to gauge the aperture set is to open the aperture fully, observe the shutter speed the camera sets, and then close the aperture until the shutter speed has decreased by the required number of stops.

The other approach is to look into the lens, to see the size of the aperture opening - but since aperture size is (I believe) on a non linear scale (logarithmic?) then it can be very hard to judge by eye.

I am curious why closing the aperture on the Canon lens causes vignetting? As it is a full rrame lens, the imaging circle should be much greater than the APS-C sensor size. I wonder if it is a mechanical issue?

The key thing to remember is that the adapter does not operate the aperture within the lens. The adapter has its own aperture between the lens and the camera. I'm not a lens design expert, but I'm pretty sure this positioning of the aperture is the problem, as normally, narrowing the aperture within a lens would not cause vignetting.

Ok! I didn't realise the adaptor has it's own aperture! My MAF mount equivalent moves the lens aperture via a pin - I assumed without having owned a Canon the design was similar, but obviously not!

My mistake...

Yes, this is because the canon ef lenses are electronic. I Guess it would be theoretically possible to back engineer an adapter that adjusted the aperture via the lens electronics, but it would be a much more complex beast. The older FD Canon lenses have an aperture dial on the lens though, so they would not need this type of adapter.

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Billious

Hi

I want to do the opposite and us the lenses from my ancient Fuji STX1 on my Canon EOS 500D but can't find an adaptor ring anywhere. I got one for an old Nikon lens I was given, but one for my Fuji lenses seems to be an impossibility. I reside in Liverpool.

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veejaycee

Several have asked about an adaptor for the old Fujinon bayonet lenses but nobody produces them. The earliest Fujinon lenses were Pentax screw fitting but I think only lasted for the first two camera models (ST605, ST705) before they changed to bayonet.

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jeremyclarke

FWIW I've read that Canon EOS mount is actually the worst for adapting things because of it's flange distance or whatever, and that ironically if you have great Canon FD lenses you want to use then your best bet was to buy a Nikon and adapt them to that (before mirrorless cameras of course, which are all great at adaptation because they have short flange and focus peaking etc.)

Thanks for the review! Very helpful to hear about the real issues. Makes me glad my only lens I wanted to adapt was manual focus anyway. Much nicer to use the traditional aperture ring and a focus ring with graduated throw and distance scale :)

The images aren't loading for me. Am I the only one?

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andyfromboston

Canon EOS has a very short flange distance as SLRs go. You can easily adapt Nikon SLR lenses to Canon. Canon FD is shorter than either of those so the lenses don't adapt well to Nikon or Canon cameras. The shortest 35mm SLR flange distance is Konica AR - it's a whole 6mm shorter than Nikon. It's great on mirrorless because the adapters and the camera-adapter-lens combo are that much smaller.

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jemmzz

i have question can the Kipon EOS-FX A, Adapter for Canon EF Lenses with mechanical aperture for Fuji X Cameras suitable for Fujifilm XA1 and can the autofocus work??

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veejaycee

There is no electrical connection through the adapters. There is no AF, manual focus only. For exposure you set the aperture on the lens if it has an aperture ring or on the adapter and either set manual shutter speed or set shutter to A for effectively aperture priority.

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