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svx94

Between weather seal and build-in flash, which one do you prefer (X-T1)

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jcx

On the contrary, for me personally the pop-up flash on the X-E1 is a handy emergency lighting aid. There have been a few times when I've been out with the intention of shooting only with available light and therefore no separate flash with me and it's great to know that I always have the ability for a little fill flash. Even better is the excellent design that enables the flash to be tilted back for bounce - something I've never seen on a built-in flash before and is ingenious. It obviously lacks power (guide number 7 compared to my SB800 at 53!), but you can't have everything. Weather sealing is of little concern to me, not least as I shoot mainly with primes, none of which are weather sealed.

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pominpocket

I like the pop up flash on the XE1 and the flash on the X100S.

To me the X100S is a beautiful little system with a flash. If you go out at night and want a quick shot an on board flash will get you it.

I do not like to get my cameras wet. How water proof is weather sealing ?

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jcx

I am confused by Fuji's inclusion of weather sealing in the X-T1 - not because photographers don't value it, but simply because, if it was their intention to appeal to those that do value it, then why not seal all the high-end lenses? Makes no sense to me.

In-camera/sensor image stabilisation would have been more useful, like the Olympus OM-D. Particularly as the CSC design concept centres around portability (i.e. dispense with the need to carry a tripod) as well as the ability to use legacy lenses that don't feature IS. The expensive 56mm f1.2 doesn't feature IS and yet the 18-55mm does - which seems to me a bit bewildering.

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veejaycee

@jcx - and any others who believe the option of "in-lens" or "on-sensor" stabilisation is simply a matter of choice or of which will make the most profit: The argument has been around for several years. Canon and Nikon have opted for in-lens stability because this stabilises the image in the viewfinder and also allows the sensor to measure more accurately the exposure. It also allows for the stabilisation to be individually tailored to each lens which in turn enables a greater range of stability (say, instead of 2 stops you get 3 or 4 stops). Both manufacturers opt for on sensor in their fixed lend cameras. May I suggest you Google "On sensor or in lens stabilisation" and you will find reams of information on the subject. Having said that, I am jealous of Olympus' 5 way stabilisation on the EM5 - if I were into video it would be enough to sway me towards Oly.

Vic.

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FJC

I think I tried on the flash on the XE-1 one time just to see what it did. Since then, my only experience with it is when it inadvertently gets released because I grabbed the camera the wrong way. But I've seen some really nice fill shots done with it.

Weather sealing seems great, but I haven't had any failures shooting in the rain--yet. Have there been a lot of problems with that?

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veejaycee

I've never babied my D300/D700 in wet weather, snow or on dusty safaris but I have taken reasonable steps to avoid absolute soakings in heavy rain with a camera/lens cover and on safari I use protective filters (not otherwise) and I take 2 bodies with short/med and med/long zooms and avoid swapping lenses.

In light-ish rain I don't bother with a rain cover and I never had problems yet.

For some reason, I do worry a bit with the XP1 in rain and keep it under my jacket when not shooting but in truth I have no reason to think it is are any less protected than the Nikons.

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K1W1_Mk2

Weather sealing seems great, but I haven't had any failures shooting in the rain--yet. Have there been a lot of problems with that?

I think that the issue is more about perception than reality. I use weather sealed and non weather sealed cameras in equal part in identical often wet conditions and I have never had problems with either sort because of water ingress.

Weather sealing gives a camera something of a "pro" look on paper probably at minimal cost to the manufacturer and I suspect probably has benefits in that it makes the camera feel tighter and less likely to creak and flex in use.

On any ILC camera there is absolutely no weather sealing every time you change a lens anyway and in my experince at least dust getting pumped into zoom lenses as they zoom is far more of an issue that moisture getting through the battery cover door of the body.

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eddickau

I have absolutely no us for built in flashes as they offer no flexibility od use and shad placement. I'll stick to off camera flashes, a cord and bracket.

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pcg

I'll echo K1W1 on this. I shoot non-sealed cameras, including the X100S, and don't think too much about weather, frankly. I don't shoot in steady or heavy rain, but that's because I don't enjoy getting soaked. The X-T1 may now make me a bit more paranoid. :-)

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DanBailey

Weather sealing all the way. I was never a huge fan of the pop-up flash on the X-E1. I used it occasionally, but having a more solid, weather sealed body is much more useful to me. The X-T1 actually comes with a tiny flash that slides onto the hot shoe. It's good enough for close work, and you can actually turn off the TTL function and make it an optical flash commander in the X-T1 flash menu. This suddenly opens up wide creative lighting options for use with my Nikon flashes. You can set all your flashes to manual and trigger them with the little flash on the Fuji.

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pominpocket

The only time I wanted weather sealing was when I was lost in the mountains in the pitch black in a huge storm in Nepal, while hill trekking in an illegal military area, at night. I was with a guide and we were both very lost. The rain soaked into my low pro bag onto my none weather sealed D7000 and the only camera with me. I was forced to take action and I found a small cottage (at then end of a lane) in the blackness and forced the door --- to be continued

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cgeorges

For landscape photography weather seal is more important. For travel photos and portraits where fill in flash is needed, a built in flash is more convenient. That being said, I think X-T1 small EF-X8 slide-in flash strikes is a perfect solution for someone who needs both.

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MikeF

Weather seal is my vote. "Twinkey" lights are never used by me unless a shoe mount flash is unavailable. When that happens, my results are always uneven, stark, and mostly worthless in my work. YMMV, of course.

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