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x100s missing major important function - instant full Auto button


Mklives

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If you're shooting f16 and a 30 second exposure I suggest you are not using the X100s as a street camera. Most street photographers are continually tweaking a camera's parameters to get the most out of it. Jack Simon doesn't struggle to take a great shot with his X100s:

Quote: «It is a good idea to check your settings when you go out.» What does he do? He sets Aperture mode, F:8 and Auto ISO at 3200 (or 1250.) Sooooo simple.

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Even the 5Dmk III has a green full Auto setting on the dial.

Sure, and it's as tiny as the X100S and about the same price.

I was responding to andyfromboston's assertion that higher end DSLRs don't have a full auto setting. Which was incorrect.

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Quote: «It is a good idea to check your settings when you go out.» What does he do? He sets Aperture mode, F:8 and Auto ISO at 3200 (or 1250.) Sooooo simple.

All photographers make mistakes, especially when they have an interviewer following them round putting them off their normal flow. Jack Simon's hit rate suggests he knows his way around a camera. If anything, modern digital cameras like the X100s get their users out of jail with incredible high ISO performance even when the other settings aren't ideal.

Full auto isn't the general panacea it's made out to be anyway, it's just an aperture and shutter pairing that will get you an image. It may not be the one you had in mind. If in doubt, be on top of your camera's controls is the best message.

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You guys are full of crap. I've been taking photos for 10 years. It doesn't take experience to be able to turn 3 or 4 knobs just to get your camera ready to take a sudden quick shot if you are in inappropriate setting.

You can do it with one turn of a knob on a Canon dslr. But you have to turn 2 knobs plus press 1 or 2 buttons (ISO, custom, etc.) on this camera. You're talking about half a second on the Canon, vs 3 or 4 seconds on the x100s. And it's supposed to be a street camera???

I am not sure insulting people will lead you very far, but let's ignore that. So, what you are saying, in essence, is that you want to use your X100S as a street camera, ready for this unexpected «great scene in front of you», but you will leave it at 30 seconds (which you most certainly use most of the time), F:16 and ISO 100 when going out in the street? I am not sure who has a problem, you or the camera.

If you'll read the whole thread, you'll see that I raised a valid point, and a bunch of people abused me (including you) with sarcastic comments, rather than admitting that yes, the camera doesn't have an ability to quickly change all settings if you need to.

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"I've found the x100s is missing this ability to override all settings to get a quick shot."

"x100s missing major important function".

Wow, you could be right. How did you miss this when shopping?

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You guys are full of crap. I've been taking photos for 10 years. It doesn't take experience to be able to turn 3 or 4 knobs just to get your camera ready to take a sudden quick shot if you are in inappropriate setting.

You can do it with one turn of a knob on a Canon dslr. But you have to turn 2 knobs plus press 1 or 2 buttons (ISO, custom, etc.) on this camera. You're talking about half a second on the Canon, vs 3 or 4 seconds on the x100s. And it's supposed to be a street camera???

I am not sure insulting people will lead you very far, but let's ignore that. So, what you are saying, in essence, is that you want to use your X100S as a street camera, ready for this unexpected «great scene in front of you», but you will leave it at 30 seconds (which you most certainly use most of the time), F:16 and ISO 100 when going out in the street? I am not sure who has a problem, you or the camera.

If you'll read the whole thread, you'll see that I raised a valid point, and a bunch of people abused me (including you) with sarcastic comments, rather than admitting that yes, the camera doesn't have an ability to quickly change all settings if you need to.

Unless I'm mistaken, I don't see many circumstances where you'd need to change settings so quickly, except in reportage or street shooting. And, as has been demonstrated, there is an easy way around that: just be resdy for street shooting. Yes, you raise a valid point that the X00S does not have a quick way to go to full Auto, though by using the Function buttons, you can shorten the time needed to get where you want to be. But I think people, including me, don't understand WHY you'd need such a quick Full Auto mode anyway in the X100S. As for being sarcastic, I was not, until you called people «full of crap.»

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You guys are full of crap. I've been taking photos for 10 years. It doesn't take experience to be able to turn 3 or 4 knobs just to get your camera ready to take a sudden quick shot if you are in inappropriate setting.

You can do it with one turn of a knob on a Canon dslr. But you have to turn 2 knobs plus press 1 or 2 buttons (ISO, custom, etc.) on this camera. You're talking about half a second on the Canon, vs 3 or 4 seconds on the x100s. And it's supposed to be a street camera???

I am not sure insulting people will lead you very far, but let's ignore that. So, what you are saying, in essence, is that you want to use your X100S as a street camera, ready for this unexpected «great scene in front of you», but you will leave it at 30 seconds (which you most certainly use most of the time), F:16 and ISO 100 when going out in the street? I am not sure who has a problem, you or the camera.

If you'll read the whole thread, you'll see that I raised a valid point, and a bunch of people abused me (including you) with sarcastic comments, rather than admitting that yes, the camera doesn't have an ability to quickly change all settings if you need to.

Unless I'm mistaken, I don't see many circumstances where you'd need to change settings so quickly, except in reportage or street shooting. And, as has been demonstrated, there is an easy way around that: just be ready for street shooting. True, the X00S does not have a «quick» way to go to full Auto, though by using the Function buttons, you can shorten the time needed to get where you want to be. And dialing A on the aperture ring and the speed dial doesn't take that long. But I think people, including me, don't understand WHY you'd need such a quick Full Auto mode anyway in the X100S. As for being sarcastic, I was not, until you called people «full of crap.»

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You guys are full of crap. I've been taking photos for 10 years. It doesn't take experience to be able to turn 3 or 4 knobs just to get your camera ready to take a sudden quick shot if you are in inappropriate setting.

You can do it with one turn of a knob on a Canon dslr. But you have to turn 2 knobs plus press 1 or 2 buttons (ISO, custom, etc.) on this camera. You're talking about half a second on the Canon, vs 3 or 4 seconds on the x100s. And it's supposed to be a street camera???

I am not sure insulting people will lead you very far, but let's ignore that. So, what you are saying, in essence, is that you want to use your X100S as a street camera, ready for this unexpected «great scene in front of you», but you will leave it at 30 seconds (which you most certainly use most of the time), F:16 and ISO 100 when going out in the street? I am not sure who has a problem, you or the camera.

If you'll read the whole thread, you'll see that I raised a valid point, and a bunch of people abused me (including you) with sarcastic comments, rather than admitting that yes, the camera doesn't have an ability to quickly change all settings if you need to.

Double post

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Don't worry, I'll stick to forums where there are nicer people who don't talk in sarcasm, such as Flickr, and leave all you obsessive rich camera freaks to your uninteresting street photography (trust me, nobody is interested in your moody street photos).

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You guys are full of crap. I've been taking photos for 10 years. It doesn't take experience to be able to turn 3 or 4 knobs just to get your camera ready to take a sudden quick shot if you are in inappropriate setting.

You can do it with one turn of a knob on a Canon dslr. But you have to turn 2 knobs plus press 1 or 2 buttons (ISO, custom, etc.) on this camera. You're talking about half a second on the Canon, vs 3 or 4 seconds on the x100s. And it's supposed to be a street camera???

I am not sure insulting people will lead you very far, but let's ignore that. So, what you are saying, in essence, is that you want to use your X100S as a street camera, ready for this unexpected «great scene in front of you», but you will leave it at 30 seconds (which you most certainly use most of the time), F:16 and ISO 100 when going out in the street? I am not sure who has a problem, you or the camera.

If you'll read the whole thread, you'll see that I raised a valid point, and a bunch of people abused me (including you) with sarcastic comments, rather than admitting that yes, the camera doesn't have an ability to quickly change all settings if you need to.

Triple post

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You guys are full of crap. I've been taking photos for 10 years. It doesn't take experience to be able to turn 3 or 4 knobs just to get your camera ready to take a sudden quick shot if you are in inappropriate setting.

You can do it with one turn of a knob on a Canon dslr. But you have to turn 2 knobs plus press 1 or 2 buttons (ISO, custom, etc.) on this camera. You're talking about half a second on the Canon, vs 3 or 4 seconds on the x100s. And it's supposed to be a street camera???

I am not sure insulting people will lead you very far, but let's ignore that. So, what you are saying, in essence, is that you want to use your X100S as a street camera, ready for this unexpected «great scene in front of you», but you will leave it at 30 seconds (which you most certainly use most of the time), F:16 and ISO 100 when going out in the street? I am not sure who has a problem, you or the camera.

If you'll read the whole thread, you'll see that I raised a valid point, and a bunch of people abused me (including you) with sarcastic comments, rather than admitting that yes, the camera doesn't have an ability to quickly change all settings if you need to.

Quadruple post. Sorry.

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An important point is being missed here. DSLRs are incredibly highly evolved pieces of photographic equipment. They have their downside, not least being too bulky and/or heavy, but if you need a camera to do something, whether it be make a video or quickly default to full auto, chances are a DSLR can do it.

Mirrorless cameras do not enjoy the same kind of universal appeal, although they have other things going for them. I find a use for both. It sounds like the OP made a bad purchasing choice.

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Don't worry, I'll stick to forums where there are nicer people who don't talk in sarcasm, such as Flickr, and leave all you obsessive rich camera freaks to your uninteresting street photography (trust me, nobody is interested in your moody street photos).

Geez, you really ARE bad-tempered and scornful. Oh, I get it, you're trolling! I should have konwn better. Get a life!

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There is the q button that you can preset for very low light with high ISO.

You can preset a button to change ISO quickly .

Or just twist aperture to auto and shutter to auto. How long does that take?

Or set your camera to bracket shots.

On auto the flash will not fire unless it is really needed on auto with a SLR with pop up flash you can take a picture of a mountain in the distance and the camera will pop up the flash unless you set it to auto no flash.

Or get one of those new camera things you wear on your head and keep it on all day .

The camera also warns you if you have the wrong exposure and you have a built in ND filter.

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Using a camera like X100s is like driving a manual stick shift car. There is no way to put it in full auto. But it gets you from here to there and, in some hands, arguably faster than an auto transmission. That's why formula one are stick shift, not auto.

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If you expect a camera to cover for you, do not buy a "pro" camera. It does what you tell it, no less and no more. You assess the intent of the photograph, the problems the shooting venue lays on you and you preset the camera do deal with all these.

If conditions change, you do not wait until the decisive moment is upon you. The moment the change takes place, you make the adjustment. You do what photographers have always done—you anticipate. If you miss a shot because it happened before your were ready, then next time, resume consciousness a couple of seconds earlier.

Great photography took place long before the term "auto" entered the photographic lexicon. Manual lenses were prefocused. Light meters were read and shutter-speeds and apertures were set. Dark slides were pulled. While it is an article of faith that an X-Pro1 is incapable of photographing a rampaging two-year-old, how did we all end up with sharp and clear baby pictures half a century or more back—more than likely shot with a 620 Target Brownie?

When you choose a "scene mode" or automatic setting, you are handing your camera to a very intelligent person in Japan who can not see what you are seeing, so makes the best possible guess—which may be awfully wrong for the situation.

For those shooting selfies with your smart phone in the bathroom of a bar, full auto makes perfect sense when you are too drunk to think. The fact that you immediately post them on Facebook confirms that you were too drunk to think. For those who line up the whole family in front of one of the wonders of the world and tell them to say "Cheese", full auto makes perfect sense. In the hands of someone shooting with a camera on the X-Camera level, it makes little sense—if any.

If you are totally inept and have blundered into squandering your gelt on an X-Cam, you can always set it to A on the aperture, A on the shutter and auto-ISO and accept whatever it decides to hand you. You paid too much and bought too much camera. Rethink.

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That's why formula one are stick shift, not auto.

I hate to be the bearer of bad news but F1 cars have not been stick shift since the mid 1990s.

They are a flappy paddle semi auto shift and they definitely have nothing that remotely resembles a clutch pedal.

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If you'll read the whole thread, you'll see that I raised a valid point, and a bunch of people abused me (including you) with sarcastic comments, rather than admitting that yes, the camera doesn't have an ability to quickly change all settings if you need to.

Just learn to use the camera, its like any tool.

Its easy enough to change the settings quickly and if you want auto thats simple enough too.

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If you expect a camera to cover for you, do not buy a "pro" camera. It does what you tell it, no less and no more. You assess the intent of the photograph, the problems the shooting venue lays on you and you preset the camera do deal with all these.

If conditions change, you do not wait until the decisive moment is upon you. The moment the change takes place, you make the adjustment. You do what photographers have always done—you anticipate. If you miss a shot because it happened before your were ready, then next time, resume consciousness a couple of seconds earlier.

Great photography took place long before the term "auto" entered the photographic lexicon. Manual lenses were prefocused. Light meters were read and shutter-speeds and apertures were set. Dark slides were pulled. While it is an article of faith that an X-Pro1 is incapable of photographing a rampaging two-year-old, how did we all end up with sharp and clear baby pictures half a century or more back—more than likely shot with a 620 Target Brownie?

When you choose a "scene mode" or automatic setting, you are handing your camera to a very intelligent person in Japan who can not see what you are seeing, so makes the best possible guess—which may be awfully wrong for the situation.

For those shooting selfies with your smart phone in the bathroom of a bar, full auto makes perfect sense when you are too drunk to think. The fact that you immediately post them on Facebook confirms that you were too drunk to think. For those who line up the whole family in front of one of the wonders of the world and tell them to say "Cheese", full auto makes perfect sense. In the hands of someone shooting with a camera on the X-Camera level, it makes little sense—if any.

If you are totally inept and have blundered into squandering your gelt on an X-Cam, you can always set it to A on the aperture, A on the shutter and auto-ISO and accept whatever it decides to hand you. You paid too much and bought too much camera. Rethink.

Best post I have read for ages.

Reading all this makes me pine for an X100S. Too often when I am in a rush I fall back on EXR mode on my XF1 or iA mode on my GX7. I usually get a great shot but I learn nothing. And I am only in a rush because I haven't thought ahead. I am trying to remember to use M, A or S mode and I am improving at it. I will not plump for the X100S until I feel ready for it, both technically, and in my style of shooting.

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or a bloody PSAM dial like on the hideous Df.. compromise, euch.

Damn...the poor red headed step child Nikon Df gets another slap along side its bean! lol :D

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@RichardCFrost said 'I will not plump for the X100S until I feel ready for it, both technically, and in my style of shooting.'

Don't wait till you feel ready, get it and using it you will quickly 'learn' how to be ready for it cos it will make you think before you shoot.

Just a bit of advice from an old lady who loves her X cameras ;-)

Viv

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or a bloody PSAM dial like on the hideous Df.. compromise, euch.

Damn...the poor red headed step child Nikon Df gets another slap along side its bean! lol :D

But still the poor Df has the best high ISO DR of any camera, even better than the new D4s...

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