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x100s missing major important function - instant full Auto button


Mklives

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I've found the x100s is missing this ability to override all settings to get a quick shot.

Imagine you suddenly see a great scene in front of you. You want to just pick up your camera and get a shot. But it's set to f16, ISO 100, 30 second exposure, plus it's on a custom setting (monochrome) which you don't want.

You'll have to change each of these settings individually. Plus you'll have to use your eyes to make sure you do it right. In the meantime, the interesting situation you wanted to photograph is over. It's going to take you 5 to 10 seconds to get ready to take your shot. I think this is ridiculous. With a DSLR, you just turn the dial to Auto, and you can take your shot.

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If I use a more 'exotic' or atypical camera setting like the one you describe, I always change it to a general point and shoot one immediately after, exactly because of the situation you describe. Instant buttons, like video, run the risk of being accidentally pressed.

P&S usually means optimal aperture around f8, auto ISO and tweak exposure compensation if there's time.

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The SLRs, by the way, don't really have a FULL "one button" Auto setting either: in addition to turning the dial to the "green rectangle", you might have to pop up the flash by pressing a button, set the ISO to Auto mode if it was set to a specific value, and also if you have previously switched the lens on manual focus, and turned off the OIS, you might have to switch those on separately. That would be about 5 controls to set to get to FULL Auto mode on an SLR.

That being said, on X100s, you could potentially leave the camera in full auto mode (Aperture and SS set to A, and ISO set to Auto), so it's ready for the unexpected, and then only override with more specific settings when you need.

But, yes, if you anticipate to take a lot of pictures in full auto, then the x100s might not be the best camera - it wasn't really designed for that.

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I disagree. My Canon 60d put everything onto Auto when I switched the dial to Auto, including ISO. Manual focus and OIS irrelevant for me as I didn't use those. DLSRs have an Auto (no flash) setting, and an Auto (yes flash) setting as well, so that's irrelevant.

At the most, you're looking at having to change 2 settings in a DSLR (auto dial + focus)

In x100s, at most you're looking at up to 7 settings you have to change (aperture, ISO, shutter speed, focus, potentially flash (not easy to change), potentially macro if it's up close, potentially auto exposure setting, if it was set to single instead of multi)

The SLRs, by the way, don't really have a FULL "one button" Auto setting either: in addition to turning the dial to the "green rectangle", you might have to pop up the flash by pressing a button, set the ISO to Auto mode if it was set to a specific value, and also if you have previously switched the lens on manual focus, and turned off the OIS, you might have to switch those on separately. That would be about 5 controls to set to get to FULL Auto mode on an SLR.

That being said, on X100s, you could potentially leave the camera in full auto mode (Aperture and SS set to A, and ISO set to Auto), so it's ready for the unexpected, and then only override with more specific settings when you need.

But, yes, if you anticipate to take a lot of pictures in full auto, then the x100s might not be the best camera - it wasn't really designed for that.

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Higher end DSLRs don't have such a full-auto quick setting. It's been a long time since I had such a thing and even when I did I never used it.

On an X100(s) you could just keep ISO on auto, and if you want to quickly get to an auto mode it's just one twist of the aperture ring and one turn of the shutter control. That's really easy. Just practice the movements a bit. Ultimately with a camera like this the idea is that you're responsible for the camera settings.

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If my D300 has a full auto button I haven't found it in nearly 5 years and 150,000 frames of use. I guess that may also mean that I have never wanted to find it either.

IMO if you want a X100 to be a p&s consider buying a X10 or X20 to supplement it.

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Those cameras classified by makers and retailers as "pro" work on the assumption that the user wants full control, even when using programmed combinations. Considering the number of available entry-level and consumer grade cameras that are readily available, there is no reason why this should be a feature of the few "pro" cameras. Consumer level cameras, provide nearly as much control and are far more user friendly.

The term "pro" should not be seen as advertising hype, but rather as an honest warning by the maker. The design team assumes that the user will have the ability to anticipate the moment and have the camera set for the eventuality well in advance. For a mid-level photographic skill, a pro camera can be the worst investment possible on a return on investment basis.

The X100S is in no way an entry-level or consumer-level camera. If you are not a photographer with long experience and knowledge of photography, it is a very poor and non-economical choice. There are far better cameras at your level.

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I understand what the OP is getting at, but I do not believe that is something that falls within the Fuji paradigm.

I know some Canikon cameras and the Olympus m43 cameras have this ability...but I think there is a relative delineation for this kind of functionality. Fuji markets the X-E1/X-Pro/X100 line toward a more experienced photographer, whereas the X-A1/X-M1/X10/X20 type cameras are more for the enthusiast and are more likely to have this kind of thing.

I just don;t see this as something Fuji would even entertain on an X100s tier camera.

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@gryphon, I agree. There's always something to complain about, and always, as you know, a complainer. This particular complaint though seems misdirected.

My X100S comes along w/ me everywhere, and on occasion I'll shoot photos hyper-fast. I'm so used to the controls at this point that any change in setup takes milliseconds. I don't even think about them.

I think my advice to the OP would be to practice taking shots in varying conditions.

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I just don't understand the OP's problem. Okay, so, there is no PSAM dial on the X100S, but if I'm in a position where I might need to quickly snap at an unexpected «great scene in front of me» (street shooting?), I will have preset my camera as follows: Aperture mode, AUTO ISO with max. ISO at 3200, min. speed at 100, film simulation at Std, or whatever, and aperture ring set at f:5.6 or f:8. Now, if this does not work for 99% of the unexpected great scenes, I don't know what will. I could even set the flash at Auto, just in case (no silent mode, but that's irrelevant). Better still, I could put it in P mode (A markings on both the aperture ring and the speed dial, as others have remarked), plus Auto ISO as described above. And I cans still quickly change the aperture for more or less DOF. As for an unexpected scene requiring a quick snap in Macro mode, that's totally beyond me.

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This is similar to the luminous landscape review where a flaw of the X-T1 is that if you are shooting a portrait, and want to quickly capture a bird flying by, it takes too long to set all the controls properly... oh well, missed the shot...

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This is similar to the luminous landscape review where a flaw of the X-T1 is that if you are shooting a portrait, and want to quickly capture a bird flying by, it takes too long to set all the controls properly... oh well, missed the shot...

Truly?

I'm going to read that one for a laugh.

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The solution is to buy 5-6 xt1's - simple. Then you also have a few primes available. No pesky lens swapping when you simply must get that pigeon flying by.

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You guys are full of crap. I've been taking photos for 10 years. It doesn't take experience to be able to turn 3 or 4 knobs just to get your camera ready to take a sudden quick shot if you are in inappropriate setting.

You can do it with one turn of a knob on a Canon dslr. But you have to turn 2 knobs plus press 1 or 2 buttons (ISO, custom, etc.) on this camera. You're talking about half a second on the Canon, vs 3 or 4 seconds on the x100s. And it's supposed to be a street camera???

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If you're shooting f16 and a 30 second exposure I suggest you are not using the X100s as a street camera. Most street photographers are continually tweaking a camera's parameters to get the most out of it. Jack Simon doesn't struggle to take a great shot with his X100s:

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I don't know where the OP is coming from, perspective wise. I do not know what cameras they have used in the past or how they prefer to shoot. All I can know if my experiences. For example, I know that the Olympus OM-D lines have the "MySet" feature, and with that feature everything that the camera is set to do - even the PASM mode is recorded. All one need do is assign the "general shooting" or specialized shooting MySet to a button and it switches everything instantaneously.

If this is what you have become accustomed to, then I can see missing it. However, to call this a flaw is like calling a manual shift car flawed versus an automatic transmission car. Just be sure that what you buy includes the must have features you need. Preferably you now this before you buy. lol

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It's not a matter of being fully Auto. Just a matter of being able to change all settings quickly if you need to. It is quite fiddly to change all these settings, as the buttons are all over the place.

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You guys are full of crap. I've been taking photos for 10 years. It doesn't take experience to be able to turn 3 or 4 knobs just to get your camera ready to take a sudden quick shot if you are in inappropriate setting.

You can do it with one turn of a knob on a Canon dslr. But you have to turn 2 knobs plus press 1 or 2 buttons (ISO, custom, etc.) on this camera. You're talking about half a second on the Canon, vs 3 or 4 seconds on the x100s. And it's supposed to be a street camera???

I am not sure insulting people will lead you very far, but let's ignore that. So, what you are saying, in essence, is that you want to use your X100S as a street camera, ready for this unexpected «great scene in front of you», but you will leave it at 30 seconds (which you most certainly use most of the time), F:16 and ISO 100 when going out in the street? I am not sure who has a problem, you or the camera.

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