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A summary of problems with the x100s


Mklives

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some of us still crave manual optical focus

and

see the advantages of digital sensors

That's why I like my legacy lenses on my GX7, at least for now.

Nice camera, especially for sports and wildlife. 100% focal length increase for legacy glass on mft format limits the manual focus choice on the wide end however.

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Some examples.

I took this photo from my bedroom yesterday morning. I was unable to retain anything from the shadows.

Not a lot of light. Shooting at ƒ8, ISO 400 at -1 EV with a fast shutter (1/2900) and spot metering aren't helping. Hard to pull shadows up when you don't spend any time with them.

I see there were some settings that weren't correctly configured (long exposure NR mentioned in another post) and a few others -- maybe you would be happier with a different camera, maybe not. I think more time with it and the manual or another book would get you better results though for sure.

I wouldn't recommend anyone with an X-Trans camera convert things to DNG without embedding the original RAW, and I certainly wouldn't recommend using an old Adobe Camera Raw to do it because holy shit, has it improved a lot in the last 12 months.

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I like the tilt screen of the X-M1;I didn't think I would because for a "pocket"

camera it means a thicker camera, requiring a panel between the screen and the

rest of the camera.

As a practical matter, a tilted screen has allowed me to keep my verticals vertical

by shooting from a lower camera position and still getting everything I want in

frame. I've seen that not everyone shares my horror of converging or diverging

verticals; maybe it's a hangover from my view camera days.

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some of us still crave manual optical focus

and

see the advantages of digital sensors

That's why I like my legacy lenses on my GX7, at least for now.

Nice camera, especially for sports and wildlife. 100% focal length increase for legacy glass on mft format limits the manual focus choice on the wide end however.

Exactly right. I bought a £25 off eBay Chinon Pentax K mount 28-50 Macro Zoom mainly to learn all about manual settings, but also to use for Macro.

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I have had my X100s for about 6 weeks. Not unlike mklives, I was also disappointed with the image quality. I found the same color smearing and resolution issues. I was almost ready to scrap the camera, but after exhaustive research I found out I was not alone in my image quality assessment...many others had experienced the same image quality issues. For whatever reasons, ACR does not do the best job of processing Fuji RAF X-Trans files. Older versions of ACR are even worse. I suggest upgrading to CC. As for post processing, you have a choice...low noise or hi detail. ACR in Photoshop CC is a good compromise, but not the best for someone desiring high detail for large print output. I suggest trying Iridient Developer using their Convolution sharpening routine at 30/50 setting for starters. You will be impressed...promise! Sharpening is as much an art form as taking the image. From what I have learned, every camera's files get post processed differently from one another. The X100s is just a little different...its unprocessed RAF files are very soft, but require careful sharpening/processing to get the most from it. This is a great little camera. I get beautiful 16" to 20" prints. FWIW...I have no monetary interest in Iridient.

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I have had my X100s for about 6 weeks. Not unlike mklives, I was also disappointed with the image quality. I found the same color smearing and resolution issues. I was almost ready to scrap the camera, but after exhaustive research I found out I was not alone in my image quality assessment...many others had experienced the same image quality issues. For whatever reasons, ACR does not do the best job of processing Fuji RAF X-Trans files. Older versions of ACR are even worse. I suggest upgrading to CC. As for post processing, you have a choice...low noise or hi detail. ACR in Photoshop CC is a good compromise, but not the best for someone desiring high detail for large print output. I suggest trying Iridient Developer using their Convolution sharpening routine at 30/50 setting for starters. You will be impressed...promise! Sharpening is as much an art form as taking the image. From what I have learned, every camera's files get post processed differently from one another. The X100s is just a little different...its unprocessed RAF files are very soft, but require careful sharpening/processing to get the most from it. This is a great little camera. I get beautiful 16" to 20" prints. FWIW...I have no monetary interest in Iridient.

Thanks for that information. I'll consider it if I hang onto the camera.

I'm actually thinking about giving up photography. I've found that it takes more time than I'm prepared to put in, to obtain satisfactory end results that give a sense of achievement. I've also found that cameras interfere with my ability to enjoy the physical environment I'm in to the fullest extent of my sensory abilities (in other words, I find that whenever I've got my camera, I'm always thinking about where I can take my next photograph, and whether or not what I'm looking at would make a good photograph. I spend less time relaxing and soaking in the atmosphere and less time actually looking at the scene with my own eyes to enjoy it in the present moment.)

It seeems to put a window between myself and reality.

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Iridient has been my go-to RAW developer for about 18 mths. Really, nothing beats it. And as I've noted previously, some of my prints are blown to 24 x 36" and detail from the X100S remains gratifying.

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@Mklives, really sounds like life is messing with you. I somewhat mean that in a good way. And regarding photography, if you don't simply HAVE to take shots, you're correct. The camera itself can stand between you and life. Gotta clarify these issues before you criticize tools. Frankly, learning photography and becoming a good photographer can take years. And the camera doesn't make a photographer good. All in all, there's nothing simple about any of this. :-)

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Photography is difficult, and the advent of digital has not made it less so. I go back to a time when learning exposure and darkroom skills were basic requirements. When I first looked at the images from a DSLR I was horrified! This was supposed to be the answer!? They looked like crap. I learnt not to trust digital cameras to think for me any more than analogue versions.

Sitting in front of a monitor editing raw footage is not my idea of fun, though sometimes it's a necessity. The main attraction of Fuji cameras was they offered good jpegs out the camera, so long as you're on top of all the other controls. Think of it as slide film and you won't go far wrong. Try to recover everything in post, any you'll be disappointed.

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I sold the x100s yesterday. I must admit, it was a magnificent camera. Almost definitely the most beautiful digital camera ever made. Much more fun and convenient to use than an slr. Much more discreet. The image quality was amazing for a compact camera, and the manual controls were just about perfect. I was very sorry to see it go, but I don't think I was doing it justice, as I don't run into many things worth photographing on a daily basis. I was always wishing I had something to photograph. As I generally only take photos about once a month when I travel to the mountains or somewhere, a portable camera is not really necessary. Plus I think I'll give up photography for a while, as it tends to consume a lot of time with mimimal sense of achievement (in my case). I may purchase a medium format film camera for b&w landscape photography in the future, and possibly something like an x10 or sony rx100 next time I travel overseas.

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  • 2 months later...

I can confirm point 3. It's a serious issue. Also with my X-E2.

I take a lot of pictures in low light. Actually one of the main reasons to buy the X-E2. However, the outrageous amount of noise reduction/smearing being applied to faces and skins is annoying. It makes the jpeg's from iso 3200 and upwards useless. I mostly shoot in raw, but this is still pretty annoying. Especially because setting noise reduction to -2 doesn't help at all!

Shouldn't the photographer at least have the option to turn it off/down? The problem wasn't there with the X-E1, X100 and X-PRO-1.

I hope Fujifilm will come with an update to fix this issue. I consider it a bug.

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If you can't have fun with photography because the tools you use "get in the way," then find some other creative outlet. Photography should bring enjoyment. Period.

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If you can't have fun with photography because the tools you use "get in the way," then find some other creative outlet. Photography should bring enjoyment. Period.

+1

Well said.

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I'm glad Mclives is only "joking" - for a while there I thought he'd bought his 100s from Venus while I'd bought mine from Mars. Seems to be a lot of hot air in this dialogue. I've come to Fuji through Leica, Hasselblad and Canon DSLR's and in my opinion that the X100s acquits itself very admirably. If I were looking for "improvements" I'd get rid of about 60% of all the programme options and simplify the whole process of getting a picture. Too fiddly, too fussy and too complicated. HOWEVER build quality is superb and IMAGE QUALITY is excellent. By the way, very nice pictures, Viv. Cheers, J2C

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The problem with smearing that has been discussed is one I had too. But it was due to very micro shaky tremors in my hands due to age which is evident when I toggle in manual and view at 100% the area which the camera is focused on. When my wife used it they were perfectly clear! The solution is either shoot at a higher shutter speed, or use a tripod or even get the E-2 or T1 with an image stabilised lens like the 18-55 mm. I opted for the last choice in the end as I wanted the flexibility of using different focal lengths but some of the pics I took with the x100 (not the S version)have been enlarged to 12 x 8 inches and are very clear.

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If you can't have fun with photography because the tools you use "get in the way," then find some other creative outlet. Photography should bring enjoyment. Period.

Or perhaps it's time to reevaluate the criteria of your needs. Some people think that a hammer, is a hammer, is a hammer...but there are finishing hammers, sledges, claw hammers, balpeen....all hammers and most can certainly drive a nail...but I'm not going to try and use a tack hammer and pound in a railroad tie.

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