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simonL

I was all set to trade in my x100 for an x100s then...

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I started to read reviews where users much preferred the image results (jpg) that the x100 produced. Also several people mentioned the x100s is missing the fun factor that the x100 had/has !!!

so do I trade in mine and spend £500 on the x100s or not bother !? One consideration is the x100 (whilst still in wonderful condition ) is what 4 years old now so maybe its time to trade in get a newer camera

any words of wisdom ?

thanks simon

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Wait till after the X100T is announced on 26 August and decide. The general sensible rule of camera upgrades to to buy every second model so the T might be the better option. If it's not then there will be discounting on s models to clear inventory before the T arrives so you win either way.

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The above statements are good ones.

You have to ask yourself, what are you upgrading for and will what you are looking at satisfy those requirements and to a point that justify the cost of the upgrade?

As K1W1 stated, those things are more apparent in 2 generations in the future of where you currently are right now. Most reviewers and myself feel that the X100s is not enough of an upgrade to the line that the person owning an X100 would buy into.

Now the X100T may be that big upgrade. If it has more MP and continues on with the high ISO performance the line is famous for, then it might be the ticket for you.

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I concur with the advice already offered. It's true that some prefer the rendering of the x100 Bayer sensor. I'm not sure about the fun factor- never heard that one. I will assume you are looking to upgrade for one of two reasons: your needs aren't satisfied by the current camera or some type of GAS. If its GAS, as mentioned above, you might as well wait for the newest sequel to come out. If its a needs thing, identify the need and make sure the new camera will satisfy that be it the S or T model. As far as image results go, it's a subjective thing that's in question so you should get your hands on the newer models to compare for yourself.

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I find it alarming that someone would describe an X100 as 'old'. Digital cameras should last a helluva lot longer than four years. Apart from some tweaking of the subsequent model, there have been no technological developments in the meantime, and may not be any in the X100t that make a difference to your photography.

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Digital cameras should last a helluva lot longer than four years.

I wasn't going to point this out to the OP but while the X100 was announced at Photokina in 2010 it wasn't available to the public until February 2011 so the oldest ones around are physically only just over 3.5 years old and even then supply was really short to start with so the majority are probably closer to 3 years old tan they are to 4 years old. :D :D

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thank you so much for the replies ..greatly appreciated.. couple of things

1.sorry I have no idea what GAS means

2.the x100 works fine ... it seems to take every 5th(10th or whatever) shot out of focus on auto but aside from that its my favorite camera ever ! (this could well be me !) Oh and the start up time is annoying as hell but you get use to it etc Since having turned on fast start up time thats much improved. !!

3. trying to explain my thinking the only analogy I can think of is you trade a car in whilst it still has some resale values etc rather than wait until its worthless and you have to start from scratch

4, I stand corrected on its age I was guesstimating !

5. I didnt mean to alarm anyone by refering to it as old ... my 7d is older and gives sterling service !

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5. I didnt mean to alarm anyone by refering to it as old ... my 7d is older and gives sterling service !

Realistically in technology terms it is old and will be even older in about 48 hours if the rumors are correct. Back in film days it probably would have taken 10 years at least to see the sort of relative differences that there are between the X100 and X100s but the only thing in the whole equation that doesn't know that it is "old" or "obsolete" is the actual camera so if you don't say anything to it it is liable to continue taking great shots for some time to come.

As far as resale is concerned it wouldn't surprise me if in two or three years from now X100 cameras were getting higher prices s/hand than X100s cameras. Remember that there were far fewer X100 cameras sold than there have been X100s and they are more unique in that they were first and they have the bayer sensor that gives them a distinctive image look.

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There are two was of looking at the problem. One is does my camera still work and can I tell the difference by looking at the image? The other is how does this old camera look on me, how quickly is it devaluing, should I desire faster AF, more pixels, a different viewfinder, is the money burning a hole in my pocket? Commerce encourages the latter position. Art has little to say on the issue.

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Losing 20% of your images to out of focus problems is more than enough reason to change cameras.

No matter how good the photos that are in focus look you are crazy to keep something this unreliable.

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Losing 20% of your images to out of focus problems is more than enough reason to change cameras.

No matter how good the photos that are in focus look you are crazy to keep something this unreliable.

How can we be sure that the issue the camera and not the shooting method? it would be a shame to upgrade only to find the same issue with the new camera. I would implore the OP to try and determine the cause of the OOF images before upgrading.

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"How can we be sure that the issue the camera and not the shooting method? it would be a shame to upgrade only to find the same issue with the new camera. I would implore the OP to try and determine the cause of the OOF images before upgrading."

My thought exactly. The X100 (with latest firmware) has not been reported to be inferior to the S model. EDIT: not inferior, as in not less accurate. Simon, make sure you have the latest firmware installed. The latest version is 2.1. A lot has been written on focusing technique. Particularly with the OVF, where parallax is an issue.

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I don't have an X100S to compare side by side, but if the difference in AF performance is like the difference between the X-E1 and E2 it's noticeable but not so much that you'd see a 20% hit rate improvement.

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I have the latest firmware and Ive found recently when Ive had to take pictures of work colleagues in a typical office environment it always took at least two per person to get one in focus. Standing same position same distance etc etc. Havng said that when I use my fuji with my dlite flashs it rarely misses a trick

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I have the latest firmware and Ive found recently when Ive had to take pictures of work colleagues in a typical office environment it always took at least two per person to get one in focus. Standing same position same distance etc etc. Havng said that when I use my fuji with my dlite flashs it rarely misses a trick

This is not typical and has not been my experience. FWIW, the EVF is easier to focus with and results in a higher success rate. Smaller AF box is more precise but can be a bit slower. You can also try AF-C mode which really excels in low light and may improver the hit rate.

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Simon, I overlooked the possibility that your missed focus shots were caused by motion in the frame. Meaning that a quicker focusing camera may help, which again points to the X100T.

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I find it alarming that someone would describe an X100 as 'old'. Digital cameras should last a helluva lot longer than four years.

The X100S is the new version of the old X100 just like the AE1 Program was the new version of the old AE1. Calling it old does not mean it doesn't still work, I have an S90 which still takes really nice photos despite it being old.

Simon, I overlooked the possibility that your missed focus shots were caused by motion in the frame. Meaning that a quicker focusing camera may help, which again points to the X100T.

Motion in the frame is usually caused by too slow of a shutter speed or the camera moving when the photo is taken (pressing the shutter release hard as opposed to gently squeezing it). The only problem a quicker focusing camera, like the XT1, will solve is shots not being captured exactly when you wanted them. You can often solve this by anticipating when you want to capture the photo. Being able to see outside the frame with the X100's OVF will also help with this.

It also bears mentioning that there were many usability upgrades on the X100S that may be more important than the faster AF. Remember, the X100S focuses faster the more challenging the light is, combine that with its wider dynamic range and 14 bit files, and the X100S is a lot better in low light. There are plenty of lists on the net which describe the many improvements found on the X100s, this video is kind of long but describes a lot of the S' benefits

. Unless you are buying used or need it now, the X100T is so close to being announced that it would be foolish to buy the X100S without first seeing what the new camera beings to the table.

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Simon, I overlooked the possibility that your missed focus shots were caused by motion in the frame. Meaning that a quicker focusing camera may help, which again points to the X100T.

Motion in the frame is usually caused by too slow of a shutter speed or the camera moving when the photo is taken (pressing the shutter release hard as opposed to gently squeezing it). The only problem a quicker focusing camera, like the XT1, will solve is shots not being captured exactly when you wanted them. You can often solve this by anticipating when you want to capture the photo. Being able to see outside the frame with the X100's OVF will also help with this.

It also bears mentioning that there were many usability upgrades on the X100S that may be more important than the faster AF. Remember, the X100S focuses faster the more challenging the light is, combine that with its wider dynamic range and 14 bit files, and the X100S is a lot better in low light.

Thanks for pointing that out regarding motion in the frame. What you said is what I meant, meaning subject motion or movement. I guess a poor (rushed) choice of words on my end.

Regarding the superiority of the X100S, I agree there have been some usability improvements. I've also seen reports reports on the dynamic range showing the edge for the Classic X100© in JPEG DR and an edge for the X100S in RAW DR. Also if the X100S has faster AF it would be in bright light due to the PDAF pixels added near the center of the frame. PDAF performs better in plentiful light. The CDAF kicks in at lower light. Interestingly, some X100© users upgraded mostly based on Fuji's promise of faster AF, and most of the complaints RE: AF involved low light scenarios, not daylight. There have been reports of the X100© being as good or a little better than the X100S in low light AF after the latest firmware update. There have also been many complaints from X100S users regarding AF. Many who had upgraded felt cheated and angry at Fuji. I have heard users who owned both cameras who said as much. The classic X100© has oft been reported to produce more pleasing JPEGS, and is easier to PP RAW images with the software of your choice. I have a 2nd Gen Fuji X camera so I know about the speed enhancements and if that is a priority then as has been suggested by myself and others to the OP, wait for the 3rd Gen replacement which probably will be announced next month in Germany.

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There have also been many complaints from X100S users regarding AF. Many who had upgraded felt cheated and angry at Fuji. I have heard users who owned both cameras who said as much. The classic X100© has oft been reported to produce more pleasing JPEGS, and is easier to PP RAW images with the software of your choice. I have a 2nd Gen Fuji X camera so I know about the speed enhancements and if that is a priority then as has been suggested by myself and others to the OP, wait for the 3rd Gen replacement which probably will be announced next month in Germany.

With all things on the internet, unhappy people are way more vocal than happy people, even if they are in the minority.

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The X100/s is an uncompromising camera. It should do what 35mm fixed lens point and shoot's do really well, but shouldn't be criticised for not being a system camera. If people are disappointed it isn't the ideal camera for bird watching or portraits, they haven't done their homework. If the AF is slow for moving subjects, that's a reasonable criticism for the type of camera it is. When the X100 first emerged it wasn't ready to fulfil the promise, but firmware fixed most of the issues. I hope the X100t keeps the concept exactly the same while improving the weaknesses. Whether those tweaks are sufficient to encourage existing X100/s users to change is the issue for Fuji. New buyers will be getting everything the company have learnt from two iterations of R&D and customer feedback, but those changes may be in ease of use, not IQ. We shall see.

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