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Just got my XT-1 last week and loving it. However, what I gonna do with the DSlR lenses? Have anyone tried DSLR lenses on your XT-1? Any idea what is the best lens adapter for XT-1? I know Fuji lenses are better but not everyone has extra cash lying around. Feedback and comments please.

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HI Asad, welcome to the forum.

Most of us use at least some 3rd party lenses - some use only 3rd party. I use a couple of Nikon AI and AIS lenses because I already had them. There are several makes of adapter ranging from expensive to very cheap. You obviously don't have money to throw around any more than I do so I will recommend Kipon adapters because I have found them reliable and good value. If you can - use lenses of the slightly older type which have an aperture ring which you will use as usual. The later type of lens needs a different adapter with a crude aperture adjustment which bears no relation to apertures as we know them- instead of f2.8, f4 etc they have a basic 1,2,3,4 setting,

There are no moving parts and no glass in the adapters so the main thing to check for is a firm but not over-tight fit to body and to lens.

I happily use 3rd party lenses but I have replaced them as I've bought more Fuji X lenses which really are very sharp and of course have AF and full exposure control.

In case you do not realise it - with 3rd party lenses you will be working in aperture priority auto or full manual. You will still have recourse to auto ISO and to ev compensation.

Vic

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Cardiobikeracer

veejaycee summed it up really well and in fine detail, so I have little to add, except to concur with the following:

I have the Kipon adapter as well (the shift model) and for the price, they are well-machined in metal, and solid. Mine has a good connection both to the X mount on the body, and the Nikon F mount lens barrel.

It works better than I expected. I use either the finder magnification or the Peak Highlight focus assist (on the X-Pro1, I'm guessing that the XT-1 has something similar) for manual focus, and they help to get the focus really accurate.

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If possible use lenses with an aperture ring - in the Nikon series the "D" lenses would be best to get CA free images and retain manual control. You would use the aperture ring in the same way as on a DSLR.

Later lenses in he "G" range have no aperture ring so a different (more expensive) adapter is needed. This adapter will have a rudimentary adjustment which is not directly related to conventional F stops.

To sum up: get an adapter WITHOUT aperture adjustment - get lenses WITH aperture adjustment ring.

If you have no lenses at present I would suggest Nikon, Olympus, Minolta Rokkor. Tokina and Tamron also come highly recommended.

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Cardiobikeracer

Oops, I should've clarified that on the set-up that I described, my old F mount lens has an aperture ring. It's a Tokina RMC 17mm, made for Nikon F mount, and in the AI-S configuration (manual focus, aperture ring).

As veejaycee pointed out, getting an SLR lens with its own aperture ring and purchasing a simpler adapter is the better solution.

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I use the Metabones manual adapter from the ebay shop lensadapter4u for Canon Fd manual lenses, and fited to a 50mm f1.4, brilliant build quality, fits like a glove, my advice is to buy good quality, you have already spent good money on a brilliant camera.

The results are stunning on my X-T1, and I love using the focus peeking, so easy even at 1.4.

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veejaycee summed it up really well and in fine detail, so I have little to add, except to concur with the following:

I have the Kipon adapter as well (the shift model) and for the price, they are well-machined in metal, and solid. Mine has a good connection both to the X mount on the body, and the Nikon F mount lens barrel.

It works better than I expected. I use either the finder magnification or the Peak Highlight focus assist (on the X-Pro1, I'm guessing that the XT-1 has something similar) for manual focus, and they help to get the focus really accurate.

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veejaycee summed it up really well and in fine detail, so I have little to add, except to concur with the following:

I have the Kipon adapter as well (the shift model) and for the price, they are well-machined in metal, and solid. Mine has a good connection both to the X mount on the body, and the Nikon F mount lens barrel.

It works better than I expected. I use either the finder magnification or the Peak Highlight focus assist (on the X-Pro1, I'm guessing that the XT-1 has something similar) for manual focus, and they help to get the focus really accurate.

I use all the manual focus options on XP1/XT1 but don't dismiss the "standard" magnified EVF/LCD which I often find is quicker, easier and more precise simply because there is less distraction from highlights especially when using a fast lens. On WA lenses the highlights can be a curse because there are so many highlight areas due to greater DoF.

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I use old lenses for their rendering as much as anything else (in fact I think the old Super Takumar 55 1.8 in many ways gives my XF56 1.2 a run for the money at about a tenth of the cost adapter included. I haven't used any of my more modern lenses without the aperture ring as I don't have an adapter that lets me use them (and I'm probably going to sell that whole thing on) I actually prefer using my old Pentax (m42 and K mount) with the Fuji over my DSLR as I hit focus more consistently due to the peaking assist

the hard part if you are supplementing your kit is getting UWA in old lenses (one of the reasons I grabbed the Bower 8mm) When I sell on my AF Pentax and the body it will fund the XF14 to complete my kit for now

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Greetings! I just received my X-T1 last night. I'm searching for information on adapters and found this web site.

I have the Nikon D7000 and the following lenses:

35mm f/1.8 Nikon

37-70mm f/2.8 Nikon

70-300mm f/3.5-5.6 Nikon

105mm VR Nikon

12-14 f/4 Tokina

Based on the discussions here it sounds like I need two adapters. I believe the 35-70mm is a D lens; the rest G; not sure about the Tokina.

I don't want to spend a ton of money on adapters but won't go cheap either. Also, if I'm absolutely hooked on ths X-T1, then I would to sell my entire Nikon gear; Or keep the body and 30-700mm for bird photography... unless there's a X lens for bird photography.

I would appreciate your input.

Thanks,

Monica

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Hi Monica and welcome,

A 140-400mm is expected next year - it will be expensive.

Your Tokina is also a D type lens so that will be fine as will the 35-70m. However, if you are in a tight budget checkout the Fuji 16-50mm lens as a used buy. There are many about and going cheap because they were bought as part of a bundle. This lens has OIS and will of course retain AF and auto exposure options.

To use all of your Nikon lenses you will need 2 adapters - Kipon are good and not expensive. The G type adapter utilises a rudimentary form of aperture adjustment in the the clicks are simply numbered and don't actually relate to any actual lens aperture.

IMO the 70-300mm will be impossible to hold steady enough for long enough to manually focus. There are some here who propound its use but the fact is their pictures are not sharp (I find 135mm is about the max to handhold while focusing and 85/105mm is much easier to focus).

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70-300mm f/3.5-5.6 Nikon

If that is the circa 2005 plastic bodied, plastic mount G lens that was introduced with the D50 I wouldn't bother. Even a cheap G style adapter with aperture control will cost you more than the lens is worth. You would be better optically and performance wise to keep an eye out for something better s/hand then get an adapter to suit.

If it's the later model VR lens then keep it and use an adapter.

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Hope you don't mind my using this thread for a question please. I have an old Minolta Dynax 35mm SLR camera; is it possible to buy an adaptor for that lens to use with the XT1, if I ever deigned to purchase it?

Viv

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@photogirl, Minolta Dynax is the Minolta AF mount for which there are suitable adaptors.

I believe from Kipon (see http://www.kipon.com/en/product.asp?id=99 ) is the MAF-FX type.

Or the one from Fotodiox at http://www.fotodioxpro.com/fotodiox-lens-mount-adapter-sony-alpha-dslr-minolta-af-a-type-lens-to-fujifilm-x-mount-camera-adapter-fits-fuji-x-pro1-mirrorless-cameras.html .

Other manufacturers may offer similar types.

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One of my favorite Nikkor lenses is the 12-24/f4 G, which was made for the APS-C (DX)Nikons, and it doesn't have an aperture ring. However, it works very well with a Kipon adapter with the aperture control, thanks to the brilliant EVF of the XT1. I just set an appropriate shutter speed and ISO, then turn the aperture control on the adapter to get the image brightness (exposure) right in the viewfinder. This results in perfect, easily obtained exposures every time. And, of course, the histogram and exposure meter are also active in the viewfinder if you choose to use them. It should be obvious that I strongly disagree with those who discourage the use of lenses that don't have aperture rings.

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Hi @HarryBinNC

I don't think the use of G type lenses is discouraged if the person already has those and if control of average exposure is the only factor with which they are concerned.

However, if the person has to buy the 3rd party lenses then it is cheaper to buy the older lenses and cheaper adapter than to buy and use newer lenses and it is easier to set the exact aperture.

While the G type adapter may be easy enough to use as you describe regarding exposure it is less easy to set the aperture one wants rather than one which matches an arbitrarily set shutter speed which may or may not be within the parameters of the aperture control. What you are describing is actually manual exposure without the benefit of knowing what aperture you are using. More importantly a lens aperture allows the user to set the exact aperture for the required depth of field rather than guess. With an aperture ring one can set the aperture they want or simply turn it as you do (but with the shutter on auto) to get the shutter speed they want. In other words they have the option of true aperture priority or full manual or, by watching the shutter speed, a form of program shift.

There are many owners of G type lenses who having tried the G adapter have opted to buy older aperture ring lenses but there are also others like yourself who manage okay with G lenses/adapters.

I do think though - if you tried a Nikon AI/S or D lens (or Canon eqiv), you would immediately see what you are missing.

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I picked up the following, and I'm very pleased with all of them.

24mm Sigma Superwide II f2,8 -Ebay £35- Superb 36mm lens on my X-T1, great sharpness and contrast. Easy zone focus for street pics.

55mm M.Rokkor 1.8 -Ebay £30- 77.5mm on X-T1, fabulous bokeh, great tonal range, very film like, great portrait lens.

85mm Jupiter 9 f2 -Ebay £60- astonishing Zeiss Sonnar copy, 127mm on X-T1, love this lens, great, soft and natural colours, good contrast, 15 blade aperture, so perfectly circular bokeh. Fabulous for portraits, or general short tele. My favourite. You can instantly tell the pics from this lens, unique.

135mm M.Rokkor f2.8 -Ebay £14.99- Amazing value, mint condition. - 202.5mm on X-T1- Great short tele, good sharpness, and contrast.

Also, not yet delivered, Helios 44 M 2 58mm f2 (1974 beLOMO version)- Ebay £28- Supposedly swirly bokeh -87mm on X-T1.

I already have this FL covered, but I'm hoping this will give me another unique look to my pics. This is a Russian copy of a Zeiss Biogon. It has a slight anastigmatic flaw at certain apertures, which gives ellipsoid specualar highlights. This appears to give a swirly effect around a central sharp focus area.

As I mentioned elsewhere, I'm using K&F Concept adapters on all these lenses. They are cheap end, all less than £10, but the fit and finish is superb. I cannot imagine how an expensive adapter could be any better on a MF lens

I also have the 18-55mm Fuji zoom, and the 14mm Fuji. I've taken the zoom out of my bag, in an experiment where I'm using all primes, all manually.

I'm getting variable results, but generally really enjoying my photography more than I have done for ages.

I really feel like I'm making photographs, rather than picking a subject and pressing the shutter. :-)

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Very tempted on the Helios 44 as well!

"...Helios 44 M 2 58mm f2 (1974 beLOMO version)..."

What is "beLOMO"? A modified lens (front or back lens element flipped - link)? It is supposed to boost the swirly effect significantly.

"...It has a slight anastigmatic flaw at certain apertures, which gives ellipsoid specualar highlights. This appears to give a swirly effect around a central sharp focus area..."

To those not aware what kind of swirly bokeh this "slight lens flaw" produce, this is a good example.

Hacking_Photography_Helios_44-2_Lens-008

The swirly thing does not happen right away (distances are important to control the bokeh) and the above may have been achieved using both a modified Helios lens and a Mitakon lens turbo adapter (like the one used here)

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