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lasousa

Air Show

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lasousa

I made an aborted attempt to shoot planes in flight at an airshow. It was a complete failure from my own lack of skill. Lens was 55 - 200. I had the camera set to CH. ISO 400. It was a variable cloudy day. I also tried zone focusing for planes coming down the flight line, low to the ground. All hand-held. Didn't get any sharp shots. There are many posts on the web on technique. And there are posts about shortcomings of the XT1 for action photography. PS. I am in love with this camera!

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veejaycee

Even with my Nikon D300/D700 I used a monopod for this type of shoot. Either a swivel or ball head loosened enough to allow movement works well. Even better is large V shaped attachment I got hold of which fits to the monopod screw. I had a small bean bag in the V to rest my 50-500mm lens on so that should the plane shoot suddenly straight up I followed it by lifting the setup out of the rest which dropped against my chest. The problem with ball heads and swivel tops is you may not be able to depress the camera enough to follow a plane/bird going straight up and thus miss the shots.

I would turn off the OIS when panning - this should make acquisition a little quicker. You need to have the subject pretty central to ensure the PDAF can get a lock-on. Don't be put off, it can take some practice - try slower moving targets to begin with and don't forget you have a firmware update coming around the 18/20 of this month which promises to greatly improve the XT1 AF.

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amazongb

The most important part of filming aircraft from the ground is shutter speed and panning. If you're filming old biplanes with slow moving props, you can get away with 1/125th, but WW2 Aircraft such as P51's, you need to be around 1/250th or 1/500th (test for prop movement). To get capture without blur takes panning practice. If you're filming jets with no props, you can pan at 1/250th and do real well.. That all said, you don't need a mono pod with the Fuji 55-200 as it will inhibit your panning abilities. If you watch the Pros at the air shows, some carry huge lenses with maybe neck attachments, but I don't see monopods often (good for birding though, where you wait around a a lot). These are my experiences... hope it helps. So, set your shutter speed, and let the ISO go up as high as need be.

Practice panning, practicing panning, practice panning.

Some examples (and i'm not a pro, just an aspiring amateur.. not all are great, but it's what I've learned..)

Sean Tucker (Oracle Stunt Pilot)

P51 Mustang

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ramso

Best technique for me is to put the camera into manual focus, then use the afl button as a focus lock... I use this for shooting kids playing football... It's not perfect but it works....

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K1W1_Mk2

Knowing only the iso you were using provides no useful info at all. What aperture and shutter speeds were used?

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lasousa

Ok sorry. I tried CH drive mode and aperture priority. Did not try shutter priority. This was obviously all wrong. Aperture was F 8 and up. I also tried manual focus to get planes doing ground sweeps relatively close to the crowd. Panning was the skill I completely failed it. This was my first attempt at panning. I had a devil of a time staying up with subjects. I appreciate all of the input very much and will practice my panning technique in my front yard as vehicles pass.

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farrell

Your shooting event is one where I would consider using shutter priority, which I

seldom do except for air shows or motor racing.

You would be much better off being driven into a non-optimal aperture than getting

motion-blur.

Approaching a target to be panned from behind works best for me.

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veejaycee

You do need to get your panning technique right and that only comes with experience - we all have to learn. Don't set too fast a shutter speed for prop planes - you want some blurred props to show otheise the prop will appear to be stationary or completely missing.

I have an evaluation copy of the new vers 4 software in my XT1. The new Zone AF will help you enormously - I mean, e-n-o-r-m-o-u-s-l-y! Should be out this week.

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