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peterjones

Inside the Opium den, Nagaland NE India

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peterjones

It was so dark that my settings were 1/15 @ f/1.4 @ 3200 ISO using a Fuji X-T1 and the fabulous 23mm. The air was so thick that my partner had to leave with a blinding headache and was sick shortly after; me? .... no sense no feeling however the gear performed famously.

_DSF1037-2.jpg

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veejaycee

You're a brave man @peterjones but it paid off with this fine image.

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MadDog

Peterjones... You want to elaborate on this?  Fantastic image but not being familiar with an opium den...

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peterjones

Whilst opium isn't smoked much in the UK it is sometimes used in remote villages within NE India where village law transcends state and national law, the villages see few tourists therefore the inhabitants aren't innured to strangers mostly being very welcoming and hospitable though I stuck to black tea rather than smoke opium, the atmosphere was very thick with opium and the acridity of the fire.

I was in NE India in November for just over 3 weeks and if you want a photographic feast India has it all, I am already planning a return.

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excalibur2811

So the 23 mm lets you get closer to people? Plus it allows you to use f/1.4. Are those the advantages?

I had thought a 23 mm lens would be too wide angle to be practical but that photo is great. I love every aspect of it.

How close can you get to something with a 23 mm lens? 

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veejaycee

It is not ideal for portraits unless you shoot at least half length and crop because the slight wide angle close up will distort features - big nose/chin or forehead if from above. It is an excellent lens for showing people in their environment and arguably the best general purpose prime with 18mm and 35mm coming close and preferred by some.

Fast (wide) apertures aren't the answer to everything. Wide apertures give narrow DoF (depth of field). Good for portraits and generally for separation of subject from the background - also for stopping movement. Of course, having a wide aperture available does not mean you have to use it.

Edited by veejaycee

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