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excalibur2811

Flash gun versus Video lamp

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excalibur2811

Hi All,

The XT-1 came with a small flash, but I will need a proper one sooner or later. I was thinking of getting a "Yong Nuo". Any opinions on this please? Or suggestions for anything different?

Meanwhile, someone I know gave me a video lamp - specifically a "Cullman Video Lamp CL 200". This was previously used for video shooting. It does not have a hot shoe - basically its just a lamp with a diffuser and the light lasts for 17 minutes. I would like to ask whether this sort of lighting is a viable alternative to a flashgun.

Common sense would seem to indicate that a constant light source would be easier for the camera in terms of calculating exposure etc?

Thanks.

John

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MrSteveVee

I've not used a video light so cannot offer a comparison, however a good dedicated flash will balance fill the scene giving you good exposures. The flash will also (assumption) be a lot brighter and thus light the scenes better than a video light and additionally  be of a short duration thus not constantly blinding your subjects. I also guess the batteries in the flash would last far longer as well.

Personally I would opt for flash. I do have a video light on one of my flashes but apart from a test to see what it does, I have never used it

Steve V

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veejaycee

Hi All,

The XT-1 came with a small flash, but I will need a proper one sooner or later. I was thinking of getting a "Yong Nuo". Any opinions on this please? Or suggestions for anything different?

Meanwhile, someone I know gave me a video lamp - specifically a "Cullman Video Lamp CL 200". This was previously used for video shooting. It does not have a hot shoe - basically its just a lamp with a diffuser and the light lasts for 17 minutes. I would like to ask whether this sort of lighting is a viable alternative to a flashgun.

Common sense would seem to indicate that a constant light source would be easier for the camera in terms of calculating exposure etc?

Thanks.

John

Checkout LED lamps (which are daylight balanced). They can be bought cheaply and are usually adjustable power. They will allow you the see the effect of lighting before taking the picture which is good training should you later more onto flash (more portable per the power output/size). Some modern studio flash units use an LED modeling light.

LED units can be used in the hotshoe but are independently powered and switched. Mostly they are used either with the add-on stand (usually included) or on a separate stand. I've found them ideal for product photography in a light tent and for studio macro/close-up. They can be used in the field but my feeling is that flash is better outside for both portrait and macro. This picture of "Chrysis" Lalique glass used 2 cheap Amazon LED lamps (6 batteries in each) and light tent with black background. (Click for large size).

I've read good things about the youn-go (or whatever) flash units but I believe you need to be careful which triggers you use for proper operation. There are also some off-camera TTL units on the market - I began a thread on this forum I think.

PP. For macro flash I use a couple of small and ancient sunpac units about £5/$5 each on ebay. Either synch on one and optical slave on the other or both fired by optical slave from the XT1 hotshoe flash.

 

_XT11969b.jpg

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Iansky

I have been using the Yongnuo 560 mark3 units for a couple of years with the Yongnuo triggers. They are robust and powerful ( I use mine with shoot through umbrellas) and very cost effective.

A lot depends on how often you want / need to use flash for, how many you need and for what purpose. I have on a couple of occasions when shooting a lot of consecutive images found they get hot but you will get a warning and recharge will take longer to give you the power you need. They are also totally manual.

There is supposed to be a new more powerful Fuji flash in the wings but any more than that I do not know.

There are also a few photographers starting to use the Rotolight LED units but they are not cheap and have limited working distance however, they are easy to use and deliver nice results for single person / small group work - have a look at this video of Jay Larnier using the Rotolight - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5Hw8mFpEVY

 

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excalibur2811

Thanks all. Your replies much appreciated. I wonder how the color temperature on an LED light would compare with that of a flashgun such as the one supplied with the XT-1, and of course how that would affect the final product. Some experimentation may be called for in this respect.

More than this however, I am becoming increasingly aware of the need to set up some form of tent or neutral background, similar to the one used by veejaycee.

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fotoman56

I use Yongnuo 460ii flash units.  They are not as powerful as the 560 series but it is just a matter of raising the ISO a little.  There is also the Neewer TT560 which I understand matches the Yongnuo 560 units but is cheaper. If I did not have three 460ii units I would have jumped on the Neewer flash.

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excalibur2811

Is a black background the best for general indoor shooting of ornaments and similar items? 

And what about when taking portraits? I am trying to find a way to make things stand out like in Veejaycee's statue photograph above, but I might also be interested in being able to set a subject over an imported background (as one might do using Photoshop). So would there be a desirable colour for this that is not black? I believe in the movies they use green? Would that work?

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veejaycee

Best background for portraits is a very roughly daubed old bed sheet of browns, greens, reds, blues but all dull of hue Ideally it should be long enough to extend under neath the model for full length shots. I have a couple of paper backgrounds on a roll which hang from a trough on a stand but they are relegated to the attic these days.

The backgrounds I used in the picture above came with the very cheap nylon light tent and they extend along the bottom as they should. These aren't available from 7dayshop now but this is what I got. for about £15. Plenty about on Amazon/ebay etc.

https://www.7dayshop.com/products/7dayshop-small-to-medium-object-studio-shooting-tent-light-cube-80x80cm-32-x32-with-zip-bag-7DAY2064B

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