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veejaycee

Not for Fuji but interesting - MF lenses made AF!

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Thinking outside the box. Really clever. I guess you set the lens manually to one end of the range and then lock it or tape it down somehow. I don't think it is for me though. I like manual and zone focussing on my classic lenses. It's why I bought them.

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Thinking outside the box. Really clever. I guess you set the lens manually to one end of the range and then lock it or tape it down somehow. I don't think it is for me though. I like manual and zone focussing on my classic lenses. It's why I bought them.

An extra bonus is that you can focus much closer - probably by using the lens manual focus - yet still have inf focus. This system would be of great benefit when using my circa 1960s Minolta Rokkor 58mm f1.4 whose manual focus rotation from closest to infinity is about 170 degrees, so very very slow to focus - though very precise.

However, I don't use these older lenses for fast focus - I have my XT1 and Fuji lenses for that. The idea of using old manual focus lenses and X-Pro1 is to improve the experience and when shooting street, zone focus with a middling aperture is the way to go. Fast apertures are fine for shooting under more controlled or less rushed circumstances.

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An extra bonus is that you can focus much closer - probably by using the lens manual focus - yet still have inf focus. This system would be of great benefit when using my circa 1960s Minolta Rokkor 58mm f1.4 whose manual focus rotation from closest to infinity is about 170 degrees, so very very slow to focus - though very precise.

However, I don't use these older lenses for fast focus - I have my XT1 and Fuji lenses for that. The idea of using old manual focus lenses and X-Pro1 is to improve the experience and when shooting street, zone focus with a middling aperture is the way to go. Fast apertures are fine for shooting under more controlled or less rushed circumstances.

Agree:don't pay for an encumbrance.

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Thinking outside the box. Really clever. I guess you set the lens manually to one end of the range and then lock it or tape it down somehow. I don't think it is for me though. I like manual and zone focussing on my classic lenses. It's why I bought them.

I also assumed the lens mounted has to be set to either infinity or near focus for it to work properly. Its causing some chatter amongst the Sony and M mount community. I know many seem to say they no longer crave a Leica body as the M mount performance with the newer A7 cameras is so good, and somewhat cheaper than a body from Leitz!

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I know many seem to say they no longer crave a Leica body as the M mount performance with the newer A7 cameras is so good, and somewhat cheaper than a body from Leitz!

it is nice to dream though isn't it? No one really NEEDS a Leica...

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My dad had a Leica lllf and collapsible 50mm Summicron.

I had a pair of m4s in the 70's, and they were great.

I don't miss them in this day and age.

I also assumed the lens mounted has to be set to either infinity or near focus for it to work properly. Its causing some chatter amongst the Sony and M mount community. I know many seem to say they no longer crave a Leica body as the M mount performance with the newer A7 cameras is so good, and somewhat cheaper than a body from Leitz!

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it is nice to dream though isn't it? No one really NEEDS a Leica...

To be honest, the comments I have seen actually prefer the A7 series over the Leitz option due to better image quality and functionally, not just a lower price.

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I can't wait for this to come to Fuji. I just bought my first manual focus lens, but have many Canon L lenses that I have yet to use on Fuji.

I'm not sure it would come or not.  There have been AF adaptors for Canon, Contax G, Nikon and now Leica M mount for some time.  I think the cameras they work with perhaps sell to a slightly different user, and also make more sense to adapt since the lenses are being fitted to cameras with full frame sensors (to maintain the field of view that the lenses were designed to give).  If any of those AF adapters were coming to Fuji, I'm sort of surprised they haven't yet.  The M mount adaptor may be more likely, but who knows if the manufacturer thinks it makes sense.  Also, be aware that Sony released the full specification for their lens mount not long after E mount was first released, about 4 years ago, and it may be that information makes these adaptors possible.  I don't know Fuji's approach to third parties and the XF lens mount.

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I think that if you want to use these on mirrorless you'll have to go Sony. I don't think they can come to Fuji - something about space in the throat of the body. If you have recent Canon glass and want AF it is best used on Canon or Sony FF.

There are two types of adapted lens users. Those who recognise the savings to be made using lenses from an existing past system or cheaply purchased 3rd party lenses and there are those who love old lenses for their different (and sometimes indifferent) qualities and who are happy to use full manual control.

For me the use of old glass is mostly for their "special characteristics" - flare, halo glows, soft edges & etc, which have been largely "bred out" in favour of sharpness, contrast, colour perfection. Of course, that is what we mostly want from our modern lenses but the older lenses can often have some of those too so we need to pick wisely to either balance the best of each in a single lens or to sacrifice the qualities of one for the other. When I use my old 60s/70s Rokkors I expect some of the aberrations we otherwise avoid these days, then try to control them to the benefit of the image rather than remove them altogether so that those aberrations become character. Modern lenses mostly have 6 aperture blades (Fuji 60mm & 90mm have 9 which makes the bokeh even better. Some old lenses had up to 22 blades giving a distinctive bokeh with special backgroundhighlights. My lenses from the 60s - early 70s are sharp in the center with soft or swirly bokeh merging to soft edges - wonderful for portraits or an ethereal look (especially with ext tubes for close-ups). Old lenses often portray more of the old look than film sims too. Maybe I'll look into using Classic Chrome with them.

Edited by veejaycee
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