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neo8175

switching from Canon to Fuji

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A few weeks ago, I decided to sell most of my Canon gear - 5D Mark III and a few Canon L lenses - in hopes of rejuvenating my interest in photography. The 5D was a great camera but was so heavy, bulky and I never wanted to carry it around with me. After reading several reviews and commentaries, I plan on buying one of the Fuji cameras but I'm having a hard to time deciding which camera to buy. I will be using the camera mainly for family photos ( I have a 4 yr old), street photography and travel. I'm not a professional photographer by any means - just a hobbyist. So far, I've looked at the xt-1, x100t and the xt10. Didn't get a chance to look at the xpro2 yet. Budget around ~2k.

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2K - British pounds or $, US/Can/Aus or Eros? Not being pedantic but it makes a big difference when you need a body with maybe std zoom + 1 or 2 fast primes. What Canon lenses do you use? (Note - use, not own.) that should be a good guide for our advice.

You are not alone in leaving Canon, Nikon for Fuji. Most of us did the same, I came from FF and APS Nikon systems.

BTW: Welcome to the forum.

Vic

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Hi, you sound I lat to me in what you want from photography and your level of expertise. I think with Fuji X-series you have three key choices to make, which then start to home in on models you may be interested in.

1) Fixed lens - for simplicity with high quality. No need to worry which lenses to take with you today. In this category, the X100T and X70 are the main contenders, with the X30 offering a zoom option, and the XQ2 a really compact option, although o viewfinder. I have had an X10 (older model of X30), and XF1 and an  XQ1 in the past. All have been excellent in their own way. For me though, compact/travel photography has led me to using my iPhone6 and a Canon G5X.

2) Interchangeable lens Rangefinder style - as a left eye shooter, and having had a Panasonic GX7 for nine months, I can definitely say this style of camera does not suit me, however, I know there are a lot of people on here who really swear by the XPro models, and the Xpro1 is a real bargain at the moment. The X-A2 might be a good start provided you don't want a viewfinder.

3) Interchangeable lens DSLR style - my preferred form factor. I opted for the X-T10 rather than the X-T1 on cost and size grounds only. The cameras are optically almost identical, but the larger camera has a superior viewfinder and a specific ISO dial, along with other features.

Personally, I love using my XT10 with Fujifilm XF zooms and third party prime lenses, which keeps the costs down somewhat and keeps me fully engaged with the camera and the lens.

Choosing is really hard. I know this as I have landed on my current kit configuration after starting with a Pentax DSLR, moving to the Fujifilm X10, then through three different micro four thirds cameras, before landing on the X-T10. Having had this camera as long as any of the previous models, I know this one is a keeper for me.

It's still a substantial camera though - too large for a coat pocket. And whilst I love my iPhone, it is for emergencies and snaps only. So I still require a compact camera and, from painful experience, it has to have a viewfinder, so after working through lots of compacts, and a year with a Canon G7X, I have settled on the G5X as being the best compromise of size with features. It is just about as big as I can accept for a compact but has all the features I need and a good zoom range with a right lens.

When it comes to compacts with viewfinders, Fujifilm only have the X30 and it is quite a large camera for the sensor size you are getting. I really wanted to like the X70 but it just did not feel right in my hands somehow, and after a year with the Canon G7X I knew I needed a viewfinder.

In answer to your original question, I am suggesting the X-T10 as being a great camera body. It is not much larger than the X70 - until you put a lens on it of course. I often use my X-T10 with an M39 screw adapter and an Industar 28mm f2.8 lens (£30) as a walk around street camera, and this combination is really small and discrete.

I hope this stream of consciousness of my experiences has helped you.

Richard

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I feel like the X-T10 is the best value at the moment, and will make for a more comfortable transition from a traditional DSLR. The ergonomics will be more familiar, as will the controls. You're getting X-T1 performance in a smaller body and smaller price, all you have to give up weather sealing and a slightly larger EVF. Weather sealing is pretty extreme and requires sealed lenses as well, I'm guessing you won't find yourself shooting in heavy rains or extreme dust too often. As for missing the larger electronic viewfinder, well, ignorance is bliss and your wallet will thank you ;) 

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I tried the switch from Canon to Fuji and have been telling myself that I should for the past two years.  I took that bold step and sold my 5D III about 5 weeks ago. The day I shipped it out I started having second doubts.  Looking through all that L glass that will now have to be used on the cropped sensor 7D Mark II got me thinking that it's probably not best (most optimal) use for that glass. Long story short, I bought another 5D III about a week ago, and to me honest I don't think I will let this one go. I guess it's nice to have the choice to use the best tool for the job.  In my mind, mirrorless and dSLRs each have their niche and distinct advantages over the other.  dSLRs: very fast focus and (at least for now) a more advanced focus system than what mirrorless manufacturers have to offer.  Mirrorless: For just about anything else.

95%+ of the time, Fuji is what I prefer (and enjoy) using, but there are times when dSLRs provide better options.  Just thought I'd share my story.  I don't think I will be selling 5D III, or the 7D II anytime soon but I think it's fair to say that I will probably not be buying any more lenses for the Canon systems.  I have been investing in my Fuji glass collection of late and don't see that changing.  It has been my experience that there are Fuji lenses which rival the Canon L glass--at a much affordable price point. YMMV.

I LOVE Fuji for general purpose--everything but focussing capability in fast action focus low light situations, so for now, waiting for that dSLR killer (improved focus acquisition and tracking speed) from Fuji.

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